0

votes

Is coconut milk naturally thick?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 07, 2013 at 8:33 PM

I just opened a can of Goya coconut milk, and it is much more runny/thin than any other canned coconut milk I've ever had. In the past, I've used Thai Kitchen and Whole Foods brands, and they were always very thick. I figured that that was just the usual consistency of coconut milk and that it was a result of the high fat content.

I noticed, though, that Goya doesn't use any thickeners -- so is the Goya coconut milk just coconut milk in its 'natural state'? Or is this one can a fluke?

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on February 08, 2013
at 01:30 PM

Almost there. *Thin* has nothing to do with the amount of water used it the processing. Thick coconut milk, grated meat soaked in warm water and then squeezed (into a separate container). Thin coconut milk, repeat 2 more times.

2194b1863657b6be2e49ae0dac911c72

(139)

on February 08, 2013
at 04:52 AM

I also think it's a temperature thing. Here in Brazil, I sometimes have to press the little boxes (in which the coconut milk is usually stored) to get the milk out of it because it is so thick. On the other hand, when it is very hot or when I keep it out of the fridge, it gets like this very liquid milk with solids which you've talked about. I don't know if you guys have the same experience, but I've also seen this with coconut oil, which, if it's not very hot, gets thick and has kind of a buttery aspect (some folks just call it "coconut fat", because it does not look exactly like oil).

  • 76c885d7d27e6c83542ea493ca866dcd

    asked by

    (2178)
  • Views
    18.9K
  • Last Activity
    1278D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

3 Answers

2
D9e4b265ef308c8cabf847559fd8be2e

on February 08, 2013
at 12:39 AM

I used to make a lot of coconut milk from whole brown coconuts and noticed variations in my batches.

Firstly, there really is no "natural state" for coconut milk since it is processed w/ added water. Coconut flesh is pulverized and very hot water is added. After standing a short time, the pulp is pressed through a very fine sieve. As the liquid cools, the water and "cream" will separate much like dairy.

So, the cream is rich and thick and sweet, suspended above the pale water. Shake or stir (homogenize) and you get "milk". But...the thickness of the resulting milk depends on the amount of water used in processing. Cheaper brands may use more water.

I noticed that different coconuts would yield various qualities: some more creamy, others more oily. The oily is inferior as it leaves hardened chunks floating and must be heated to re-blend. My wife bought a can of Goya and it was this oily type. Also, dried shredded coconut may yield this less-creamy type of milk. So there might be an issue w/ the quality of coconut they are using, like a 2nd pressing sort of thing.

For the true coconut freak: http://aciar.gov.au/publication/MN101 There is a free PDF at the bottom of the page.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on February 08, 2013
at 01:30 PM

Almost there. *Thin* has nothing to do with the amount of water used it the processing. Thick coconut milk, grated meat soaked in warm water and then squeezed (into a separate container). Thin coconut milk, repeat 2 more times.

1
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on February 07, 2013
at 08:52 PM

It could be a temperature thing. I use 365 brand a lot and we store the extra cans in the garage, but we've had some hard freezes this winter, so the coconut milk is VERY thick. Ordinarily, I can shake the cans up, use a church key can opener, and pour it all out with very little residue in the can. But after they've been frozen, the coconut milk is lumpy, and I have to open the whole lid and scrape it out thick lumps.

That said, most of the commercial coconut milk makers do add thickeners.

OTOH, I've been buying frozen 100% coconut milk from the Philipines at a local Asian market. There's nothing in this but coconut milk. Instead of a somewhat thick, homogenous milk, it's a very liquid milk plus finely ground coconut solids that will suspend in the liquid if you shake well. Very different from the canned stuff--and delicious!

2194b1863657b6be2e49ae0dac911c72

(139)

on February 08, 2013
at 04:52 AM

I also think it's a temperature thing. Here in Brazil, I sometimes have to press the little boxes (in which the coconut milk is usually stored) to get the milk out of it because it is so thick. On the other hand, when it is very hot or when I keep it out of the fridge, it gets like this very liquid milk with solids which you've talked about. I don't know if you guys have the same experience, but I've also seen this with coconut oil, which, if it's not very hot, gets thick and has kind of a buttery aspect (some folks just call it "coconut fat", because it does not look exactly like oil).

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on February 08, 2013
at 02:35 AM

I've tried a number of run-of-the-mill coconut milks. I don't get hung up over a few additives here or there, it's a processed product after all and I'm consuming it because I like the product. That said, my favorite for flavor is Thai Kitchen, seems to be the creamiest and freshest tasting, tends to be priced a little higher than some, actually priced high enough over other product that I don't buy it.

Goya is vile stuff. Watery, flavorless... cheap though.

My go-to brand with the best balanced between taste and price is Chaokoh. As cheap as Goya, but flavor and texture like Thai Kitchen with only a little preservative present. It has a toasty flavor, which I don't know where it comes from, but I don't mind it, particularly nice in cooked dishes, it's a little misplaced in smoothies.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!