2

votes

What (natural) household cleaners do you use?

Answered on September 20, 2014
Created June 02, 2012 at 12:02 AM

Last night I was cleaning my bathroom - using "409" or whatever that citrus scented crap from the grocery store is. It was REALLY strong, and very unpleasant to smell it for even a couple of minutes.

I'm curious as to what natural things people use for household cleaners? Any suggestions for when giving the bathroom/kitchen a deep clean?

7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d

(5959)

on June 02, 2012
at 01:13 PM

For all Aubrey Organics' marketing hype about the irritating qualities of the common surfactants used in shampoos, the most violently irritating personal care product I've ever used is one of Aubrey Organics soap-based shampoos. No matter how tightly I shut my eyes, the soap would get in and leave my eyes so bloodshot that I looked like something out of a horror film, and on top of that, it left my hair feeling like straw.

1398eff69b192c35de5e0dbaad59052a

(2024)

on June 02, 2012
at 05:22 AM

But regarding the sals suds ... I have used it in the past, and have been eh about it. I never felt that its combination of surfactants cleaned very well, and the fact that it's so thin makes you use a lot more of it. It's also REALLY expensive for what it is. You could use shampoo, or bodywash, or dishwashing liquid and get the same (if not better) results. And speaking of which, honestly, the main difference between those three is just packaging. And scent, of course.

1398eff69b192c35de5e0dbaad59052a

(2024)

on June 02, 2012
at 05:10 AM

Oh you're right -- I didn't read that carefully enough. I just saw Dr. Bronner and assumed it was their soap. Though frankly, I have never been impressed with Dr. Bronner anything, including their Sal Suds. As for what makes good soap ... technically speaking, soap is the salt of a fatty acid. Different fatty acids contribute different quality to the soap. What is a "good" soap is therefore highly subjective. Some people really like how drying Dr. Bronner's soap is--that's because of all the coconut. I personally prefer a castile soap, which is 100 percent olive oil or a surfactant-based soap

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on June 02, 2012
at 04:03 AM

Sal Suds isn't soap...may as well compare apples to apples. Zoomia, what makes good soap? The only liquid soap I've ever loved using was pricy French castile soap.

1398eff69b192c35de5e0dbaad59052a

(2024)

on June 02, 2012
at 02:19 AM

Actually, for the most part, I agree with you. What people don't realize is that often, surfactant-based cleaners (Dawn) actually work better than lye-based soap (Dr. Bronner's, which is also some of THE worst soap ever, trust me, I'm a soapmaker.) There's also this idea that it's so much more natural, and therefore better for you. Which actually isn't the case.

276a5e631b62f8e0793987c0496364bb

(1644)

on June 02, 2012
at 12:57 AM

Soda water is also very useful.

Aa69579f867333b08158c70e25f7daf1

(1826)

on June 02, 2012
at 12:04 AM

I'm interested in anyone's experiences with Norwex. Never used it, but heard good things about it from other crunchy granola mom friends of mine. :-)

  • 712c1d3724f9b6ebfc0eb9b64a803692

    asked by

    (158)
  • Views
    2.4K
  • Last Activity
    1424D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

9 Answers

6
5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on June 02, 2012
at 12:24 AM

Baking soda

White vinegar

Calcium carbonate (Bon Ami)

Citra-solv

Boiling water

-

276a5e631b62f8e0793987c0496364bb

(1644)

on June 02, 2012
at 12:57 AM

Soda water is also very useful.

2
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on June 02, 2012
at 03:41 AM

  1. Baking soda (cannot live without it).

  2. I can't stand the smell of vinegar, I use citric acid instead.

  3. Microfiber cloth - works wonders on dust, windows, stainless steal. I have at least 10 of them.

  4. Sodium Perborate for tough stains on clothes. Ox bile soap for some stains.

  5. Eco-friendly dish washing liquid that is completely natural and does not smell.

This is ALL I use. Never use anything else.

2
7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d

(5959)

on June 02, 2012
at 01:39 AM

At the risk of incurring the wrath of downvotes, I have to admit that with one exception, I don't use any of those hippie cleaning products because they're ridiculously ineffective. The one exception is Seventh Generation fabric softener, which smells really nice. Other than that, I use conventional products because they actually work.

Here's what I'm talking about: I had a wool sweater with arm pits that were full of really nasty stank, even after washing. I wet it and applied Dr. Bronner's Sal Suds to the pits, full strength, lathered it up, let it sit for half an hour, and rinsed it out. It was as if I'd done nothing to it. Repeat with Dawn dishwashing liquid: stank gone. And, that's not the only case. Take the hippie dishwasher detergent... stuff was so lame I practically had to hand wash the dishes before loading the dishwasher.

It's Formula 409, Clorox Cleanup, Cascade, Windex, unscented Tide detergent, etc. for me.

1398eff69b192c35de5e0dbaad59052a

(2024)

on June 02, 2012
at 05:10 AM

Oh you're right -- I didn't read that carefully enough. I just saw Dr. Bronner and assumed it was their soap. Though frankly, I have never been impressed with Dr. Bronner anything, including their Sal Suds. As for what makes good soap ... technically speaking, soap is the salt of a fatty acid. Different fatty acids contribute different quality to the soap. What is a "good" soap is therefore highly subjective. Some people really like how drying Dr. Bronner's soap is--that's because of all the coconut. I personally prefer a castile soap, which is 100 percent olive oil or a surfactant-based soap

1398eff69b192c35de5e0dbaad59052a

(2024)

on June 02, 2012
at 02:19 AM

Actually, for the most part, I agree with you. What people don't realize is that often, surfactant-based cleaners (Dawn) actually work better than lye-based soap (Dr. Bronner's, which is also some of THE worst soap ever, trust me, I'm a soapmaker.) There's also this idea that it's so much more natural, and therefore better for you. Which actually isn't the case.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on June 02, 2012
at 04:03 AM

Sal Suds isn't soap...may as well compare apples to apples. Zoomia, what makes good soap? The only liquid soap I've ever loved using was pricy French castile soap.

1398eff69b192c35de5e0dbaad59052a

(2024)

on June 02, 2012
at 05:22 AM

But regarding the sals suds ... I have used it in the past, and have been eh about it. I never felt that its combination of surfactants cleaned very well, and the fact that it's so thin makes you use a lot more of it. It's also REALLY expensive for what it is. You could use shampoo, or bodywash, or dishwashing liquid and get the same (if not better) results. And speaking of which, honestly, the main difference between those three is just packaging. And scent, of course.

7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d

(5959)

on June 02, 2012
at 01:13 PM

For all Aubrey Organics' marketing hype about the irritating qualities of the common surfactants used in shampoos, the most violently irritating personal care product I've ever used is one of Aubrey Organics soap-based shampoos. No matter how tightly I shut my eyes, the soap would get in and leave my eyes so bloodshot that I looked like something out of a horror film, and on top of that, it left my hair feeling like straw.

2
61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on June 02, 2012
at 12:23 AM

White vinegar and water works well and sanitizes. I clean cutting boards with it. I use the dishwasher detergent from Tropical Traditions.

1
D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on June 02, 2012
at 04:11 AM

  1. All purpose cleaner: Vinegar, water, my favorite cleaning essential oil blend (http://www.naturesgift.com/aromatherapyhousehold.htm#Spice)
  2. Grease: Sal suds, diluted
  3. Scrubbing, deodorizing: Baking soda I buy in bulk at Costco
  4. Scubbing: Borax on a wet rag gets soap scum out of the tub
  5. Laundry: Soapnuts liquid for most stuff. If I'm doing gnarly dirty towels or such, eucalyptus EO in with it. If it's just plain REALLY dirty, Sal Suds. I'm not in love with the soapnuts for other stuff, but I LOVE the soft, clean, unscented sheets and towels I'm getting now. I've always used good eco friendly detergent, but apparently even that was leaving a residue. I can tell the difference with the soapnuts.

1
1398eff69b192c35de5e0dbaad59052a

(2024)

on June 02, 2012
at 01:55 AM

Bathroom kitchen spray. Take a spray bottle, fill 2/3 to 3/4 with hot water. Add a teaspoon of dishwashing liquid (or powdered surfactant if you have it, which I do because I make stuff). Gently swirl until dissolved. Fill the rest of the bottle with just plain old rubbing alcohol. You can add a couple drops of essential oil if you want. Lavender/tea tree is good, as is anything citrus. Right now I have lavender/geranium and it rivals anything from Mrs. Meyers albeit without cute packaging.(Don't overdo--it will take a couple days for the scent to "set").

If you've ever used Trader Joe's cleanliness is next to godliness spray, this is like that. I just hate the smell of the EOs they use.

The soap water combo cleans, the alcohol disinfects and makes it dry faster so no streaks. You can make this without, but keep in mind that the alcohol also acts as a preservative.

0
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on September 20, 2014
at 01:08 AM

I admit to using mostly commercial products--commercial toilet bowl cleaner and commercial shower cleaner, Soft Scrub for sinks.  But for surface cleaning I either use orange spray (I buy concentrate and dilute it) or make my own by stewing orange rinds in vinegar (at room temperature) for a few weeks.  I mostly buy it becuase I can no longer eat the oranges (migraine triggers), so they go to waste.  I use a lot of vinegar around the house, too. 

0
0366bc921072277bedcf0d8c6c74e3f6

on September 19, 2014
at 09:02 PM

Freshana - My goto cleaner these days. 

0
8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

on June 02, 2012
at 12:22 AM

Earth friendly products. I've tried about half of there 40+ products. Great stuff for bathroom, kitchen, pets etc. like wood/furniture polish, floor cleaner, bathroom cleaner, all purpose cleaner, window/mirror cleaner, dishwashing liquid, etc. There's also baking soda and vinegar for some types of cleaning that you can find solutions online.

http://www.ecos.com/

http://www.ecos.com/faq.html

Q: Do your products kill bacteria? A: No, our products are not anti-bacterials or sanitizers. They do a great job of cleaning surfaces, but will not kill bacteria.

Q: Who should use Earth Friendly Products? A: Earth Friendly Products are designed for everyone and anyone who wants to retain their good health. They contain no carcinogens, are non-toxic and plant-based. Earth Friendly Products are the type of products sought by people who are concerned about reducing the amount of toxins and in their home and the environment, including those sensitive to allergies.

Q: What makes your products Earth Friendly? A: Earth Friendly products are non-toxic and plant-based. Our products are free of phosphates, chlorine, petroleum chemicals and a variety of other harmful ingredients (see our Freedom Code). They are 100% biodegradable and the containers are easily recycled.

Q: Some of your labels don't say biodegradable. Does this mean the products aren't? A: They all are biodegradable. Look for fine print, at the bottom of the back label. If you don't see it, the product is still and always will remain biodegradable.

Q: Are your products tested on animals? A: NO! Earth Friendly Products does not believe in testing on animals or using animal ingredients. Our products are never tested on animals or contain animal byproducts.

Q: Is your laundry detergent gluten-free and casein-free? A: Yes, our laundry detergent is gluten-free and casein-free. All of our products are gluten-free except for our Orange Plus Cleaning Towels, which contain wheat germ.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!