3

votes

Anything like f.lux for television?

Asked on June 19, 2015
Created June 25, 2012 at 3:15 AM

I use f.lux on my macs to change the blueish screen glow to something warmer, which supposedly screws less with your circadian rhythms. I'd love it if there were something similar one could do for occasional television watching. Does anyone know of any televisions that would allow you to do something similar? (An automatic "warm light" setting would be ideal...)

I suppose one might just go in and screw with the color settings? If so, are there any benchmarks or guideposts to aim for, or do you just try to tint the screen as orange as you can stand it?

026dde5c5ed48e30d006ac075410871e

(288)

on July 03, 2012
at 12:08 AM

I read this in "Counting Sheep" - the research was done by Cornell University, and it's considered controversial. http://books.google.com/books?id=StCdxuLcokoC&lpg=PP1&dq=counting%20sheep&pg=PA117

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on June 29, 2012
at 07:28 AM

I have not found it yet, but I do remember it being referenced in Mark Sisson's and Robb Wolf's book. So maybe I should scrutinize the references in the back of those. Not finding anything online is making me think that this is either in a paper I would need to buy access to, or I've been duped by a paleo echo chamber urban legend.

44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on June 26, 2012
at 01:01 AM

I'll keep checking back to see if you guys find it, and I'll dig around too... I'd say the TV probably makes noise, maybe even outside the audible range that could be interfering with sleep (like you mentioned). Hopefully we can find some concrete research either way.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on June 25, 2012
at 11:50 PM

That was the same one I was thinking of, but haven't been able to find it yet. I did find one study about blind people and bright light exposure to augment circadian rhythm, but I'm not sure how many lux and what spectrum light was used in that study. Working on my own n=1, the times I've pulled down my sleep mask, but failed to turn the TV off I've felt like dooky in the morning (although it could be related to that little high pitched squeal from the TV as much as the light.)

Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

(5198)

on June 25, 2012
at 10:02 PM

I'm not looking for it now, but there was something where a blue pinpoint light was shone on a leg or something when the rest of the body was covered and they measured a response. I'll let you know if I stumble across a link.

44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on June 25, 2012
at 09:18 PM

Do you have links to any research? I would agree that Sunlight (full spectrum, including IR and UV) could have effects on your skin... but artificial light from a TV is a relatively narrow band of EM radiation, and therefore I would imagine we can't use results from sunlight exposure when making conclusions about artificial light sources.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on June 25, 2012
at 08:36 PM

The photoreceptors in the eyes are the most sensitive, but there are also photoreceptors on the skin, and waking can be triggered by skin exposure to sunlight even if something like a sleep mask is worn.

44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on June 25, 2012
at 07:23 PM

I wasn't aware that blue light on your skin from a TV had an effect on circadian rhythm...? Could you elaborate on that a little more Happy Now.

44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on June 25, 2012
at 05:15 PM

As far as I know, they do... From the first comment, "The SCT Orange lens tint blocks virtually all ultraviolet, violet, and blue light while allowing most of the longer visible wavelengths to pass through. This gives it an orange/deep orange coloration. Unlike most sunglasses, this is one of the few true 'blue-blocking' lens tints." They work for me so far as well.

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on June 25, 2012
at 04:02 PM

Do they filter out blue light? That's the problematic light that keeps you awake. Blue light is similar to morning sunlight.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on June 25, 2012
at 11:05 AM

What Nemesis said + turning off the TV a few hours before bedtime. That has the useful effect of also screening out the mass media propaganda and ads. Very paleo. Read, stare at the fire, chat with the tribe mates, do a little grooming, have a little sex.

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5 Answers

best answer

6
44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on June 25, 2012
at 12:06 PM

I recently picked up a pair of these stylish glasses. You might get a few weird looks, but they work well and don't cost a fortune (ie anything from lowbluelights.com). Plus, you can watch TV, check your cell phone and use normal lights and still limit the effect on your circadian rhythm...

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on June 25, 2012
at 04:02 PM

Do they filter out blue light? That's the problematic light that keeps you awake. Blue light is similar to morning sunlight.

44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on June 25, 2012
at 05:15 PM

As far as I know, they do... From the first comment, "The SCT Orange lens tint blocks virtually all ultraviolet, violet, and blue light while allowing most of the longer visible wavelengths to pass through. This gives it an orange/deep orange coloration. Unlike most sunglasses, this is one of the few true 'blue-blocking' lens tints." They work for me so far as well.

1
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on June 25, 2012
at 06:52 PM

If you want to keep the blue light off of your skin as well as out of your eyes, go to a theatre supply store and get some amber or orange light gel sheets to put over the screen.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on June 25, 2012
at 08:36 PM

The photoreceptors in the eyes are the most sensitive, but there are also photoreceptors on the skin, and waking can be triggered by skin exposure to sunlight even if something like a sleep mask is worn.

44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on June 26, 2012
at 01:01 AM

I'll keep checking back to see if you guys find it, and I'll dig around too... I'd say the TV probably makes noise, maybe even outside the audible range that could be interfering with sleep (like you mentioned). Hopefully we can find some concrete research either way.

44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on June 25, 2012
at 09:18 PM

Do you have links to any research? I would agree that Sunlight (full spectrum, including IR and UV) could have effects on your skin... but artificial light from a TV is a relatively narrow band of EM radiation, and therefore I would imagine we can't use results from sunlight exposure when making conclusions about artificial light sources.

44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on June 25, 2012
at 07:23 PM

I wasn't aware that blue light on your skin from a TV had an effect on circadian rhythm...? Could you elaborate on that a little more Happy Now.

Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

(5198)

on June 25, 2012
at 10:02 PM

I'm not looking for it now, but there was something where a blue pinpoint light was shone on a leg or something when the rest of the body was covered and they measured a response. I'll let you know if I stumble across a link.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on June 25, 2012
at 11:50 PM

That was the same one I was thinking of, but haven't been able to find it yet. I did find one study about blind people and bright light exposure to augment circadian rhythm, but I'm not sure how many lux and what spectrum light was used in that study. Working on my own n=1, the times I've pulled down my sleep mask, but failed to turn the TV off I've felt like dooky in the morning (although it could be related to that little high pitched squeal from the TV as much as the light.)

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on June 29, 2012
at 07:28 AM

I have not found it yet, but I do remember it being referenced in Mark Sisson's and Robb Wolf's book. So maybe I should scrutinize the references in the back of those. Not finding anything online is making me think that this is either in a paper I would need to buy access to, or I've been duped by a paleo echo chamber urban legend.

026dde5c5ed48e30d006ac075410871e

(288)

on July 03, 2012
at 12:08 AM

I read this in "Counting Sheep" - the research was done by Cornell University, and it's considered controversial. http://books.google.com/books?id=StCdxuLcokoC&lpg=PP1&dq=counting%20sheep&pg=PA117

1
1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on June 25, 2012
at 03:22 AM

Aside from adjusting the color settings, you might find a pair of lightly-tinted orange glasses you could wear while you're watching tv. That way, any guests you have won't have to see everything in orange as well ;)

0
5b9a25a1a676397a25579dfad59e1d7b

(2318)

on March 03, 2015
at 05:43 PM

So if you're not just looking for a pair of glasses that block the blue light but also a pair that ACTUALLY look good and stylish (sorry @jjtitus, but those glasses in the link above are quite unappealing), then you should check out GUNNARS. I purchased a couple pair of these and they are not only modern looking (I've received many compliments on how they look), but they work like a charm! Big difference.

AND if you happen to need a prescription, you can order these using your rx so you don't have to awkwardly layer one set of glassses on top of the other. Highly recommended!

Bonus: People won't question your sanity when you're in the office wearing weird yellow tinted glasses. In fact, I've started a new trend at work!

0
9dd74d3941535d0aaa2c8d3cf454fb7e

on June 26, 2012
at 01:02 AM

A first step would be to change the settings on your television to produce the warmest color temperature. Samsung LED TVs, as one example, often offer four different color temperature settings - pick the warmest (lowest K number). Doing this will reduce the amount of blue light emitted.

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