6

votes

Alright. Cinnamon. How much or less? How often? What benefits?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 13, 2012 at 8:33 PM

I do not eat cinnamon often, because of the doubt that it can be THAT healthy for me. When i do use it though, it is in a pretty generous amount. It makes sweet potatoes taste all the better, with butter of course.

So: Cinnamon, healthy or not?

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on March 09, 2012
at 12:30 AM

We grind ceylon cinnamon at my work and it is the best, such a fantastic flavour! You can also get the ceylon oil (from the leaf or bark) for flavouring, it is a bit more citrus-y tasting than the just the bark.

912d417b992445a654a14a3942c95642

(91)

on February 04, 2012
at 12:07 AM

thanks! i work at winn-dixie, so i'll spend some time hiding form the boss in the spice section

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on January 14, 2012
at 02:58 PM

A teaspoon in coffee with coconut milk/oil works nicely.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on January 14, 2012
at 02:57 PM

That said, I do enjoy it in coffee at times (when I get sick of vanilla extract). Or in home made paleo pumpkin pie 1x a year. :)

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on January 14, 2012
at 02:56 PM

Exactly. I saw "Cinsulin" at Costco a few years back and I laughed my ass off. Even if it does help regulate blood sugar, why would you take it in pill form at insane prices, when you can just buy it as a spice and use it as a spice. Besides, if you're after blood sugar regulation, just cut out the sugar.

87b7d250ea30415ed4c1afd809f4053f

(968)

on January 14, 2012
at 01:37 PM

Yeah, cinnamon is commonly recommended for diabetics to balance blood sugar, don't remember where i read it though. Gymnema and neem are good too :)

A942dbc90fe12f7f90744a68f9f223e2

(249)

on January 14, 2012
at 03:05 AM

1 sweet potato\yam mashed 1 apple diced 1 tbs coconut oil cinnamon salt cloves nutmeg ginger

Bfa1c9eacfc94a1b62f3a39b574480c6

(3700)

on January 14, 2012
at 01:33 AM

Is there documented evidence for preventing sugar spikes? I always hear about it, but haven't heard or read evidence for it.

8838443ac82e9f98e4ae9daf80d50eb5

(896)

on January 13, 2012
at 11:47 PM

wow, thank you. Didn't know there are different types. I'll be changing to Ceylon now that I know.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on January 13, 2012
at 10:40 PM

My recollection is that the Coumarin is toxic, but not a blood thinner unless it's modified by something else.

912d417b992445a654a14a3942c95642

(91)

on January 13, 2012
at 09:11 PM

Oh geez, thanks guys. Maybe i should start using it more often :D Everyones been such a big help since i started this lifestyle; and still learning! Happy eatings ^^

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13 Answers

best answer

8
F44b15b2fd1ad134200793d6b474fc4c

(938)

on January 13, 2012
at 10:28 PM

If my research is correct, the benefits that everyone is listing here apply to Ceylon cinnamon, not the more commonly eaten type in the U.S. which is Saigon cinnamon (and which, technically isn't really cinnamon -- it's a different bark).

When I read about this difference, I bought some Ceylon cinnamon and realized what I was reading was true as far as what we eat in the U.S. We eat Saigon cinnamon. (People in Europe eat Ceylon as do those in Mexico -- in fact, Ceylon is a main ingredient in many Mexican dishes.

The Ceylon tastes utterly different from the cinnamon I've eaten all my life. It's not sweet and rich but milder in flavor and with a citrus-like scent and taste. At first I didn't like it, but now I do -- so much that I use it by the teaspoonful because it's so much milder than Saigon. I still miss the "red hots candy" taste of Saigon, but I'm sticking to Ceylon because I also read that the Saigon (and other types that aren't Ceylon) are not good to eat in large quantities because they contain coumarin -- a blood thinner -- considered toxic enough in large quantities -- a teaspoonful or more a day --that Germany has banned the sale of Saigon and similar cinnamons.

I hope my facts are right. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

8838443ac82e9f98e4ae9daf80d50eb5

(896)

on January 13, 2012
at 11:47 PM

wow, thank you. Didn't know there are different types. I'll be changing to Ceylon now that I know.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on January 13, 2012
at 10:40 PM

My recollection is that the Coumarin is toxic, but not a blood thinner unless it's modified by something else.

912d417b992445a654a14a3942c95642

(91)

on February 04, 2012
at 12:07 AM

thanks! i work at winn-dixie, so i'll spend some time hiding form the boss in the spice section

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on March 09, 2012
at 12:30 AM

We grind ceylon cinnamon at my work and it is the best, such a fantastic flavour! You can also get the ceylon oil (from the leaf or bark) for flavouring, it is a bit more citrus-y tasting than the just the bark.

5
5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on January 13, 2012
at 10:37 PM

I take most of the Cinnamon info with a grain of salt, and don't supplement with it. Other than for tastiness on food. :)

My reasoning. We don't really know what Cinnamon they're talking about for the most part. I think it's extremely misleading (in America at least). In literature historically, when you see Cinnamon, people are talking Ceylon Cinnamon (aka True Cinnamon). However there's actually multiple different species, all sold as Cinnamon. The stuff sold in America is actually a different tree (Cassia, Saigon, etc) because it's cheaper. It doesn't necessarily say that on the label either.

Research is done on the misc species, and they usually have different, conflicting results. Not necessarily the same species, not necessarily the same benefits (Cassia seems to be the antidiabetic one for example). Plus, in some situations, negative impact (Cassia has more Coumarin in it, which is toxic to the liver in large doses).

More work than it's worth I think.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on January 14, 2012
at 02:57 PM

That said, I do enjoy it in coffee at times (when I get sick of vanilla extract). Or in home made paleo pumpkin pie 1x a year. :)

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on January 14, 2012
at 02:56 PM

Exactly. I saw "Cinsulin" at Costco a few years back and I laughed my ass off. Even if it does help regulate blood sugar, why would you take it in pill form at insane prices, when you can just buy it as a spice and use it as a spice. Besides, if you're after blood sugar regulation, just cut out the sugar.

2
1d1738cf2e03d99b2aaeec2813c4669f

(204)

on January 13, 2012
at 09:33 PM

I eat it in almost everything... I love cinnamon. It does prevent sugar spikes, so it great for diabetics. It has a lot of other great benefits I can't think of right now, but cinnamon, definitely awesome. Probably my favorite spice.

Bfa1c9eacfc94a1b62f3a39b574480c6

(3700)

on January 14, 2012
at 01:33 AM

Is there documented evidence for preventing sugar spikes? I always hear about it, but haven't heard or read evidence for it.

87b7d250ea30415ed4c1afd809f4053f

(968)

on January 14, 2012
at 01:37 PM

Yeah, cinnamon is commonly recommended for diabetics to balance blood sugar, don't remember where i read it though. Gymnema and neem are good too :)

2
956bcad1d462d433a4e1e22f6e3355d5

(1191)

on January 13, 2012
at 08:50 PM

It's tasty, pretty inexpensive and they say it also is an antifungal. So hell yes.

1
A0f2f0f632d42215944a798486bddde1

(1377)

on March 09, 2012
at 12:22 AM

All the blood sugar/insulin studies have found effects from cassia, but not true cinnamon. Cassia does have coumarin which can be toxic depending on dose, but it's also been the subject of studies showing it may improve glucose metabolism & insulin sensitivity. True cinnamon on the other hand has no coumarin, but also has not been shown to have any health benefits that I know of.

1
2c66c70d033e7ec05327026121d2ceb4

on January 13, 2012
at 09:55 PM

It's great in black coffee.

It's supposed to increase insulin sensitivity as well, but I just add it because I have grown to like the taste. Any additional health benefits are a bonus.

1
Cbda678b2a6bf0537d8c4ea0ce8aa9ad

(4319)

on January 13, 2012
at 08:52 PM

I use it a lot because it is supposed to benefit us Type II diabetics. I have started buying it by the kilo...

1
6714718e2245e5190017d643a7614157

on January 13, 2012
at 08:48 PM

Cinnamon and other spices are great to use and add flavor to many paleo dishes:

http://paleodietnews.com/1208/spices-and-herbs-for-the-paleo-diet/

0
2a00b9a42e4cb6e489a0e69d20714576

on March 09, 2012
at 11:07 AM

Hang on, most cinnamons widely available at grocery stores are not even actually cinnamon, its a bush that has no similar health benefits. Real cinnamon is key to blood sugar regulation. We get a kilogram bag from anywhere $30-$50 depending on quality. Most health food stores will alert you to the real bag.

0
4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on January 14, 2012
at 02:16 AM

One potentially bad aspect of its slowing effect on digestion is that it can increase the risk of SIBO.

0
8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on January 14, 2012
at 01:28 AM

I use several types of "cinnamon" because it tastes great, not for any of the health claims. I love it with coconut, berries, meats and all sorts of coffees and teas. I get mine from Penzey's.

0
537001f30670e73eb0ac45779af649a5

on January 13, 2012
at 10:12 PM

which brands do you guys get

0
B3eb43fed50082f2ac4306796ab33b5c

on January 13, 2012
at 09:48 PM

Well... I have just gone Paleo, but I have been eating about a teaspoon of cinnamon a day for the past year. During that time, I ate well in general, but I was under some extreme stress -- and I haven't even had so much as a sniffle, even when everyone around me was suffering from colds and flu. I credit the cinnamon! My challenge now that I no longer eat oat bran is to find ways to include my cinnamon.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on January 14, 2012
at 02:58 PM

A teaspoon in coffee with coconut milk/oil works nicely.

A942dbc90fe12f7f90744a68f9f223e2

(249)

on January 14, 2012
at 03:05 AM

1 sweet potato\yam mashed 1 apple diced 1 tbs coconut oil cinnamon salt cloves nutmeg ginger

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