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Verrry interesting article: Thoughts? interpretations?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 29, 2012 at 1:50 PM

the master link ya'll!

What are your thoughts? Does this fit within your paradigm? Any issues with the methods?

81181cab058dd652659e4bb2e6f25843

(528)

on October 01, 2012
at 01:45 PM

Desmosterol is the cholesterol precursor, not a cholesterol lowering precursor. Its ability to reduce the # of foam cells by making macrophages more adept at clearing cholesterol(s) would have a relative inflammatory effect since foam cells are anti inflammatory according to the study. Seems to me that by upping Desmosterol by eating non esterified cholesterol (I'm not sure how to up per-se Desmosterol) the macrophages would clear Debris stuck in the endothelial wall much better but our inflammation would have a relative bump up compared to having anti-inflammatory foam cell formation.

81181cab058dd652659e4bb2e6f25843

(528)

on September 29, 2012
at 10:30 PM

Do you have any resources for this theory?

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 29, 2012
at 03:58 PM

Well yes, the foam cells are unable to digest cholesterol, but they are anti-inflammatory. Desmosterol is a precursor, meaning its what the cholesterol is made from. That implies that if you eat cholesterol raising foods, youd also have more cholesterol lowering precursors, no? And more importantly, where does the inflammation really come from, if it has no connection to cholesterol? And what causes the desmosterol to become crippled? All I am getting at, as this raises more questions than it answers...and it kinda mystrifies the actual process esp compared to standard lipid hypothesis..

81181cab058dd652659e4bb2e6f25843

(528)

on September 29, 2012
at 02:58 PM

What does this add...?

81181cab058dd652659e4bb2e6f25843

(528)

on September 29, 2012
at 02:57 PM

I'm not positive how to interpret it myself... lol. I apologize but I don't completely follow your thoughts (it's probably me). What i got out of it: foam cells = malfunctioning macrophages unable to 'digest' cholesterol and other debris. foam cell formation -> suppresses inflammatory gene expression = anti- inflammatory. Desmosterol = final stage before cholesterol is formed . Desmosterol -> signals more cholesterol uptake and less cholesterol formation/release. Desmosterol -> helps macrophages better digest cholesterol, (reducing foam cell formation?)

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4 Answers

3
Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 29, 2012
at 02:04 PM

If these foams cells are anti-inflammatory, what then causes the inflammation. Doesnt this mean the lipid theory has another hole blown out of it?

If the precursor, truely is a precursor, then its levels should generally outstrip LDL when you have the ingredients for the precursor in abundance, given its materials > precursor > LDL, and when youve loads of precursor, the manufacture is stopped, and LDL cleared up.

Its very interesting research, but I am uncertain why the researchers are still buying the lipid hypothesis from the results. Seems to be a spanner in the works in a major way...

"n atherosclerotic lesions, Glass said the normal function of desmosterol appears to be "crippled.""

This seems to suggest an entirely seperate mechanism for heart disease..

Am I reading it wrong?

81181cab058dd652659e4bb2e6f25843

(528)

on September 29, 2012
at 02:57 PM

I'm not positive how to interpret it myself... lol. I apologize but I don't completely follow your thoughts (it's probably me). What i got out of it: foam cells = malfunctioning macrophages unable to 'digest' cholesterol and other debris. foam cell formation -> suppresses inflammatory gene expression = anti- inflammatory. Desmosterol = final stage before cholesterol is formed . Desmosterol -> signals more cholesterol uptake and less cholesterol formation/release. Desmosterol -> helps macrophages better digest cholesterol, (reducing foam cell formation?)

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 29, 2012
at 03:58 PM

Well yes, the foam cells are unable to digest cholesterol, but they are anti-inflammatory. Desmosterol is a precursor, meaning its what the cholesterol is made from. That implies that if you eat cholesterol raising foods, youd also have more cholesterol lowering precursors, no? And more importantly, where does the inflammation really come from, if it has no connection to cholesterol? And what causes the desmosterol to become crippled? All I am getting at, as this raises more questions than it answers...and it kinda mystrifies the actual process esp compared to standard lipid hypothesis..

81181cab058dd652659e4bb2e6f25843

(528)

on October 01, 2012
at 01:45 PM

Desmosterol is the cholesterol precursor, not a cholesterol lowering precursor. Its ability to reduce the # of foam cells by making macrophages more adept at clearing cholesterol(s) would have a relative inflammatory effect since foam cells are anti inflammatory according to the study. Seems to me that by upping Desmosterol by eating non esterified cholesterol (I'm not sure how to up per-se Desmosterol) the macrophages would clear Debris stuck in the endothelial wall much better but our inflammation would have a relative bump up compared to having anti-inflammatory foam cell formation.

0
3d1ae01a679a3356fe5fcd796a47f563

on October 12, 2012
at 06:29 AM

The article is saying yet again: a significant part of modern medicine - the most promoted part - is updated snake-oil sales and the writer uses some scientific-sounding ideas to promote scientific nonsense.

0
04ca28a864b04ce6c5e6b43f84b25e0d

on September 29, 2012
at 06:15 PM

From my research into cholesterol, the investigators have made an error in their baseline assumption. Cholesterol is formed in r(x)n to an acid/alkaline imbalance. It is the stuff that protects our vein and arteries from corrosion. The higher the acid state, the more cholesterol will be produced. Inflamation is the cause of acid/alkaline imbalance or acid/alkaline imbalance causes inflamation, this is the important distinction the investigators have missed.

81181cab058dd652659e4bb2e6f25843

(528)

on September 29, 2012
at 10:30 PM

Do you have any resources for this theory?

0
2e6e673ce3eb647407d260d4d57a731b

(1021)

on September 29, 2012
at 02:04 PM

they could just, you know, eat healthier

81181cab058dd652659e4bb2e6f25843

(528)

on September 29, 2012
at 02:58 PM

What does this add...?

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