6

votes

Suggestions for a cholesterol experiment

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 08, 2013 at 2:00 PM

I was thinking about performing a N=1 experiment to see if I could hack a cholesterol test. I'm not at all worried about my levels (around 220), but I worry that I might need to get a test for insurance purposes, and they don't care that my heart scans show no blockage.

Common wisdom says that you can't have any great influence on cholesterol levels for testing, yet still insist that you fast. I have noticed that other bloodwork markers are greatly influenced by things like proper hydration, alcohol, sweets, etc. Most of us don't get cholesterol tests every week because we assume that it doesn't change that rapidly, but I've learned that common wisdom is frequently wrong or misguided.

I don't want to lower my cholesterol long term, just to "pass" an insurance companies tests. These ideas are not about eating right and paleo, but about body hacking.

Ok, having said that, I was thinking about getting a baseline test, then doing a week of changing a variable and testing again for a month or two. Some possible variables are:

  • No Dairy
  • No Alcohol
  • Low Fat
  • Fasting and MCTs
  • Niacin and Supplements (red yeast rice?)

Any other ideas or suggestions? Has anyone ever tried something like this?

FEEDBACK - Good suggestions so far. It seems like I should try a week of "traditional" foods, like beans, oats, low-fat, etc. Anything else?

UPDATE - I think I might have to shorten the window for this experiment. I am a family man, so I can't just eat what I want from the rest of the family for a month. Do you think I could make an impact in 1 or 2 days?

Here's my ideas so far... Any feedback is helpful.

  1. Get a control test in the morning. A typical fasting since dinner the night before.
  2. Consume nothing but coffee, tea, water and coconut oil for the whole day. Drink lots of water.
  3. Get a test in the morning.
  4. Go back to my normal paleo life for a week.
  5. Get a control test.
  6. Eat low-fat, standard recommended fare (oats, beans, etc) for the rest of the day. No dairy, no alcohol.
  7. Get a test in the morning.
  8. Get back to normal for a week.
  9. Control test
  10. Same paleo diet, but take Niacin, activated charcoal, red yeast rice. Don't overdo the fat, though.
  11. Morning Test
  12. Reset Week
  13. Exercise like crazy and barely eat anything.
  14. Test

Does that sound good, or does anyone have any other ideas/suggestions?

UPDATE 7-17-13 Ok, I decided to wait until September, after all the vacations and interruptions on normal life to start the test. I'll update my info when available.

Experiment 1: 8-7-13 I got an opportunity to do a full day fast, so I'm doing the fasting part of the experiment: I last ate at 7:30 PM and got my cholesterol checked at 9:00 AM this morning. The results are:

  • Total Cholesterol - 239
  • HDL - 49
  • Trg - 134
  • LDL - 163

My plan is to fast all day, drinking nothing but coffee, tea, broth and water. I reluctantly skimmed the fat off the broth, so the calorie content is minimized.

I'll get my cholesterol checked at the same place using the same machine tomorrow at 9:00 AM (for a total of a 37.5 hour fast) and I will post the results tomorrow.

Experiment 1: Day 2 Ok, after an additional 24 hours of fasting, I got my cholesterol checked again.

The result are:

  • Total Cholesterol - 285
  • HDL - 42
  • Trg - 214
  • LDL - 200

Interesting!!! All I had to eat in 37.5 hours was black coffee, hot tea, a bit of bone broth and water and my numbers shot up dramatically! I used the same Pharmacy and machine to get tested, so even if there's some calibration issues, the results are still out of the range of typical errors.

I have a few opinions on what happened, but I'd rather hear from all of you out there to get some different ideas. But, the conclusion of the first experiment is that Paleo people shouldn't do a long fast before getting a cholesterol check.

Side Note - The pharmacist called me out of the blue later that day to say that he ordered a calibration kit for the testing machine to confirm if everthing was working correctly because he couldn't believe the results. He also said that I was the only one to get tested those days, so no one else had used it. Clearly, I got his attention!

Additional Note: I've shared my results with my coworkers as they sometimes enjoy/get amused at my little health experiments. They almost all believe what's been said about not being able to change the results of your cholesterol levels quickly, so they all think that there might be something wrong with the testing machine. Intersting... they can't believe the theory is wrong, so they have to blame the machine.

Additional Research I checked a couple different sources, and apparently getting cholesterol checked when you're losing weight isn't recommended because you're using fat as a fuel source, therefore have more floating around the blood. Since I'm usually hovering around the fat burning stage most of the time (due to lower carb intake), I'm sure I was in serious fat burning mode by the 36th hour of fasting. If I were a SAD eater, I'd probably be burning through my sugar and glycogen stores.

That being said, maybe my next experiment should be the opposite. Perhaps I should carb load with starchy things (potatoes, yams, rice?) and limit fats the night before the test. If I were getting tested for insulin or blood glucose, it probably won't look good, but I'm just focusing on cholesterol numbers.

Call from Pharmacists - One of the pharmacists who did my tests called me today to let me know that they tested the calibration of the machine (whatever that means) and determined that it was working fine and that the numbers I got were accurate (at least for a fingerstick test). It's interesting that both of the pharmacists there are now taking an interest in my experiment and they said they're looking forward to my next one (which probably won't be for a few more weeks).

Experiment 2 Since I last experiment raised my cholesterol when I was in heavy fat burning mode, I decided to try it the other way around this time. I just got back from vacation where I had way too much sugary foods and drinks and little to no exercise. I figure that my glycogen stores are filled up, so I have a good resevoir to pull from to keep me from burning fat. I then will have a low fat type of diet for a day or two and see what happens. I'll post my results as they come in.

Experiment 2 : 8-30-2013 After a holiday of behaving badly, my control numbers are high.

  • Total Cholesterol - 291
  • HDL - 50
  • Trg - 352
  • LDL - 171

Wow, alcohol and sugar really ramps up that triglyceride level, doesn't it. Now for a day of lowfat starchy carbs (lentils, bean soup, rice).

Experiment 2 : 8-31-2013 Results are a bit disappointing. I apparently went too far with my "carb reefed," especially since most of my carbs were sugary alcoholic drinks. I can't determine if the changes are just me getting back to normal, or if it was the dietary change. I did notice a few things that lets me know I'm on the right track with my regular diet. After almost 48 hours of hardly any fat, I woke up hungry for the first time in years. I almost fell asleep after lunch, which I haven't done for years either. I felt tired and cranky. Upon returning to my normal high(er) fat diet, I started feeling good again. I don't think I'll try this experiment again anytime soon.

The Results: - Total Cholesterol - 273 - HDL - 41 - Trg - 328 - LDL - 166

Conclusions: I'm not sure if I learned too much from these tests except that cholesterol levels can change, and that these tests are only a snapshot of what's flowing through my blood. Most of us here know that there's so much wrong with the conventional wisdom about cholesterol, and judging from the reaction of the pharmacists and people around me, people have a hard time believing that there could be so much variation.

I've been keeping track of my cholesterol for almost 8 years, and I can see a decent sized drop in total cholesterol and a big raise in HDL when I started eating and exercising paleo. Most of my numbers hover around where my very first control test was, so I have a generally good idea of what my norm is.

Thanks for all the information that everyone provided. I have learned quite a bit more than I did before. Please feel free to add more comments. My learning about health is always ongoing.

3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on September 03, 2013
at 01:25 PM

Yeah, I didn't like those numbers. Ever since eating paleo, my triglycerides dropped to the low hundreds. I've had them in the double digits before, but I apparently have a genetic predisposition to produce a lot. Now that vacation and this experiment is over, I know my numbers are getting back to (my) normal. I feel a million times better, too. I forgot how much sugar sucks (after you're done eating/drinking it).

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on August 30, 2013
at 06:30 PM

The type of fiber is probably important. I've seen evidence grain fiber can raise LDL.

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on August 29, 2013
at 04:08 PM

@Anon: From what I've read here and elsewhere, I agree with your comment 'what good are these tests in the first place?" Honestly, if it's so easy to hack your numbers then what kind of information are we getting from them and how useful are they?

048dd52752c45129c1212bfffb37ca72

(3150)

on August 15, 2013
at 03:07 PM

When I was a vegetarian I had a 180 total c and I even ate eggs and non-taf dairy, now I have 308... So yep, vegan maybe a quick fix hehe

3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on August 15, 2013
at 02:34 PM

Thanks for the info! Yes, I'm not looking for a long term solution, but a quick fix. It looks like I'm going to have to make sure I'm not burning fat before my test, but I'm not sure. I'll have to make that my next experiment. As an interesting note, my Doctor said that I should switch to a vegan diet because his cholesterol dropped 100 point the first week. I just nodded, but I was thinking, "then what good are these tests in the first place? If you can change your results as easily as that, or what I did the first go round, then its only giving a snapshot in time and nothing else."

Ba20b502cf02b5513ea8c4bb2740d8cb

(1669)

on August 14, 2013
at 07:44 PM

@cd Link please?

Ba20b502cf02b5513ea8c4bb2740d8cb

(1669)

on August 14, 2013
at 07:04 PM

hey man interesting stuff...you should start a blog and publicly journal your progress.

3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on August 12, 2013
at 03:58 PM

Most of my fat comes from either animal sources or coconut oil, which I sometimes put in my morning coffee. A little will come from cheese and kefir, but that's not very often. I had some beef patties and some potatoes before my initial fast, and then nothing for the following 24 hours, so I don't think dairy was involved with anything.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 09, 2013
at 07:40 PM

And as far as the ketosis argument, according to this paper: http://www.jacn.org/content/19/3/383.long , you would expect that the LDL may go up, but your trigs should have plummeted. so serum ketones should not increase trigs.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 09, 2013
at 07:37 PM

Interesting. Paper filter should be fine as I believe that it is the coffee bean oils that may increase trigs.

3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on August 09, 2013
at 03:38 PM

Also to wonder, since I consume considerably less carbs than the rest of the population (present company excluded), I wonder if my fasting "starting point" is different. ie: I stopped burning sugars and switched to fat a lot faster than the "normal" test subjects out there.

3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on August 09, 2013
at 03:34 PM

Yes, I use a paper filter. I've heard that there are some differences in the brewing method but I'm didn't know that it could affect my triglycerides. The trigs were higher than other tests I've had even in the first test. I also made sure I had no alcohol in the few days before this experiment because I know that it can affect trigs. Good info! I'll have to keep that in mind for whatever I try for the next experiment.

Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on August 09, 2013
at 10:03 AM

Interesting, thanks for letting us know.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 08, 2013
at 07:59 PM

Daily for a month ahead of a blood test. I used a mix of soluble and insoluble fiber. It was a lot more fiber than I'm used to eating, so I was kind of glad it didn't work and I could scratch it off the list. The only thing that gave large reductions for me was statins, which would drop LDL by 40. I haven't found any dietary or exercise tricks that do much to LDL, so I settle for raising HDL to reduce my CV risk. Over 6 years I've raised it from 35 to 80-85, primarily by walking 10 miles a day.

3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on August 08, 2013
at 05:26 PM

Thhq, how long did you eat like that before you got tested?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 08, 2013
at 05:20 PM

If you choose to do it, measure the fiber content of your diet and aim for 40-50 g fiber per day.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 08, 2013
at 05:18 PM

I ran this experiment and got nothing on LDL reduction.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 08, 2013
at 05:17 PM

I diligently jacked my fiber on an isocalorie diet for a month ahead of my annual blood test a couple years ago. My LDL went up compared to the previous year. It might work for some people but it wasn't effective for me.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 08, 2013
at 05:11 PM

Exercise raised my HDL but didn't lower my LDL.

3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on July 10, 2013
at 12:48 PM

I think having a supplement regimine would be a good week to experiment with. I personally can't donate blood since I had childhood cancer (they won't allow it for some reason) and I'm not going to get some leaches, and I already do fasted HIIT. I'll have to keep up my exercise routine I guess, unless there's something else I need to add to it.

5dd50f78f47b8848d93724d6eb38d4c1

(907)

on July 10, 2013
at 07:27 AM

Cut the fats and use only small amounts of lean meat. If you need to use a bit of fat use olive oil.

3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on July 09, 2013
at 04:47 PM

So, maybe a week of beans and oats?

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on July 08, 2013
at 09:20 PM

The reason they ask you to fast is that eating may interfere with measuring HDL, not with total cholesterol (which is why you can get total cholesterol measured without fasting). Recent evidence suggests that even this might be incorrect, and fasting doesn't affect HDL that much after all (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23147400).

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on July 08, 2013
at 09:19 PM

The reason they ask you to fast is that eating may interfere with measuring HDL, not with total cholesterol (which is why you can get total cholesterol measured without fasting). Recent evidence suggests that even this might be incorrect, and [fasting doesn't affect HDL that much after all](http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/11/12/cholesterol-tests-may-not-hinge-on-fasting/).

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on July 08, 2013
at 08:29 PM

the 20 potatoes a day guy dropped his cholesterol from 214 to 147. If you are interested in just total cholesterol, Costco and CVS have fairly cheap tests...

Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on July 08, 2013
at 03:59 PM

See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bile_acid_sequestrant

3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on July 08, 2013
at 03:36 PM

Activated charcoal? That's one I hadn't heard of. I'll have to look that up!

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9 Answers

2
E1ddd515befc496b91d3e19140ce5678

on July 13, 2013
at 09:47 PM

Try adding exercise as well! Drinking plenty of water... You can find more options by typing low cholesterol diet. Let us know if you were able to pass the test.I might need that also in a few months...

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 08, 2013
at 05:11 PM

Exercise raised my HDL but didn't lower my LDL.

1
048dd52752c45129c1212bfffb37ca72

on August 14, 2013
at 07:22 PM

This is very interesting and I've contemplated the possibility to try the very same hack both for me and my dad. Specially for my dad because he has been in statins due to a hearth attack and I'm pretty sure that if his LDL skyrockets they will put them again on them, I don't want this to happen so I need to hack his cholesterol also, I'm also interested to fake my docs in several kind of situations when I don't want them to point to a certain problem to LDL, I've noticed that when they see high total cholesterol and LDL they give you a tablet full of SAD directions and not look for any other causes, so I want them to not focus on cholesterol, so I'd better lower it for a short period. Althought I must admit, it would be nice to not get more than 220 or so on a general basis, ok I do not fully believe in the lipid hypothesis but not sure also that having constant high LDL is a thing not to worry...

OK that being said, I think that a diet with moderate carbs that match a ratio of 1:1 carbs to protein and with not very high GI stuff and lots of fiber, pectin rich foods (apples and grapefruit) and resistant starch would do the trick nicely. Also lower you fat intake as much as you can, specially saturated and omega 6's, I'd say having only low fat dairy would be adviseable. Remember, I hear you, we're not discussing an optimal diet but a fast way to lower LDL and total cholesterol.

I think that a Perfect Health Diet approach could serve you well also, most people on it report pretty great numbers because they stay in a moderate carb scheme. When you go too much low on carbs, it seems that LDL receptors are downregulated via poor T4 to T3 conversion so the thyroid works slower and it seems that carbs stimulate the thyroid.

You might be interested also in that guy's N=1: http://bjjcaveman.com/2013/06/23/the-effect-of-a-ketogenic-diet-on-cholesterol-part-4/

I'd also get rid of the coconut oil for some time, I'm not saying that it might not be terrific for many reasons but it's also known that might rise both HDL and LDL. If you drop 10 points on HDL your doc won't look bad at this but if you raise 30 your LDL he will so I'd play it safer.

I think that some liver cleanse herbs and NAC could help, the liver is pretty important regulating LDL, you want it optimal.

See Examine.com related supps and stuff that seems to lower cholesterol: http://examine.com/topics/Total+Cholesterol/

As a fast hack, berberine seems to do wonders.

Please keep us informed!

3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on August 15, 2013
at 02:34 PM

Thanks for the info! Yes, I'm not looking for a long term solution, but a quick fix. It looks like I'm going to have to make sure I'm not burning fat before my test, but I'm not sure. I'll have to make that my next experiment. As an interesting note, my Doctor said that I should switch to a vegan diet because his cholesterol dropped 100 point the first week. I just nodded, but I was thinking, "then what good are these tests in the first place? If you can change your results as easily as that, or what I did the first go round, then its only giving a snapshot in time and nothing else."

048dd52752c45129c1212bfffb37ca72

(3150)

on August 15, 2013
at 03:07 PM

When I was a vegetarian I had a 180 total c and I even ate eggs and non-taf dairy, now I have 308... So yep, vegan maybe a quick fix hehe

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on August 29, 2013
at 04:08 PM

@Anon: From what I've read here and elsewhere, I agree with your comment 'what good are these tests in the first place?" Honestly, if it's so easy to hack your numbers then what kind of information are we getting from them and how useful are they?

1
96d0f148db40114c8e27f130bbbfae18

on August 14, 2013
at 06:23 PM

A 4 oz. serving of oyster mushrooms has as much lovastatin in it as a pill of Mevacor. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lovastatin http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleurotus_ostreatus

You could eat a couple servings a day for a few weeks before your test.

Another idea is to dilute your blood by donating a pint 24 hours before the test.

1
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 09, 2013
at 03:06 PM

This is a fairly well documented phenomina that fasting causes an acute increase in total cholesterol. although your numbers are not consistent. I am particularly interested in the increase in trigs.

It is well documented that fasting can increase HDL and LDL (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0939475312002578). But there should be a slight dip in trigs. Given that you have a calculated LDL using the freidwald formula, the increase in the LDL is consistent with the increase in the Trigs.

I would wager that the coffee is to blame for the increased trigs. Do you use a paper filter? or do you use a metal filter/ french press/ peculator/ etc.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 09, 2013
at 07:37 PM

Interesting. Paper filter should be fine as I believe that it is the coffee bean oils that may increase trigs.

3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on August 09, 2013
at 03:34 PM

Yes, I use a paper filter. I've heard that there are some differences in the brewing method but I'm didn't know that it could affect my triglycerides. The trigs were higher than other tests I've had even in the first test. I also made sure I had no alcohol in the few days before this experiment because I know that it can affect trigs. Good info! I'll have to keep that in mind for whatever I try for the next experiment.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 09, 2013
at 07:40 PM

And as far as the ketosis argument, according to this paper: http://www.jacn.org/content/19/3/383.long , you would expect that the LDL may go up, but your trigs should have plummeted. so serum ketones should not increase trigs.

3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on August 09, 2013
at 03:38 PM

Also to wonder, since I consume considerably less carbs than the rest of the population (present company excluded), I wonder if my fasting "starting point" is different. ie: I stopped burning sugars and switched to fat a lot faster than the "normal" test subjects out there.

1
5dd50f78f47b8848d93724d6eb38d4c1

on July 09, 2013
at 01:47 AM

Add oats. They have been known to be healthy for decades in regards to heart health. Also add some sources of resistant starch.

5dd50f78f47b8848d93724d6eb38d4c1

(907)

on July 10, 2013
at 07:27 AM

Cut the fats and use only small amounts of lean meat. If you need to use a bit of fat use olive oil.

3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on July 09, 2013
at 04:47 PM

So, maybe a week of beans and oats?

3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on August 08, 2013
at 05:26 PM

Thhq, how long did you eat like that before you got tested?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 08, 2013
at 05:20 PM

If you choose to do it, measure the fiber content of your diet and aim for 40-50 g fiber per day.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 08, 2013
at 07:59 PM

Daily for a month ahead of a blood test. I used a mix of soluble and insoluble fiber. It was a lot more fiber than I'm used to eating, so I was kind of glad it didn't work and I could scratch it off the list. The only thing that gave large reductions for me was statins, which would drop LDL by 40. I haven't found any dietary or exercise tricks that do much to LDL, so I settle for raising HDL to reduce my CV risk. Over 6 years I've raised it from 35 to 80-85, primarily by walking 10 miles a day.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 08, 2013
at 05:18 PM

I ran this experiment and got nothing on LDL reduction.

1
75d65450b6ff0be7b969fb321f1200ac

(2506)

on July 08, 2013
at 08:40 PM

A word of caution about niacin. Besides known to cause flushing, which for me is unpleasant and quite weird, it causes an increase in stomach acid production. Definitely avoid niacin if you have an ulcer or have had an ulcer recently. I learned this lesson the hard way. After only 3 days on 200 mg of niacin my old ulcer started to reawaken.

As for diet and cholesterol, after going full Paleo (and low carb) for a years my total cholesterol went up some, as did LDL. However triglycerides plummeted, and my HDL increased by 30%. So on balance Paleo did wonderful things for me. However if your insurance company stupidly only eyes TC and LDL going Paleo may work against you. ... Having said all this, my cholesterol levels were very low to begin with. Therefore my experience might not be entirely relevant for you.

_Lazza

1
Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on July 08, 2013
at 02:25 PM

My guess...

You could eat a week of reduced-fat high-fibre ketogenic diet and supplement with activated charcoal. Then a fasted HIIT session donating blood within a few hours and then having blood drawn for the cholesterol test. Also activities that raise testosterone would probably help too.

3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on July 08, 2013
at 03:36 PM

Activated charcoal? That's one I hadn't heard of. I'll have to look that up!

Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on July 08, 2013
at 03:59 PM

See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bile_acid_sequestrant

3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on July 10, 2013
at 12:48 PM

I think having a supplement regimine would be a good week to experiment with. I personally can't donate blood since I had childhood cancer (they won't allow it for some reason) and I'm not going to get some leaches, and I already do fasted HIIT. I'll have to keep up my exercise routine I guess, unless there's something else I need to add to it.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 08, 2013
at 05:17 PM

I diligently jacked my fiber on an isocalorie diet for a month ahead of my annual blood test a couple years ago. My LDL went up compared to the previous year. It might work for some people but it wasn't effective for me.

Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on August 09, 2013
at 10:03 AM

Interesting, thanks for letting us know.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on August 30, 2013
at 06:30 PM

The type of fiber is probably important. I've seen evidence grain fiber can raise LDL.

0
Medium avatar

(10611)

on September 02, 2013
at 03:49 PM

re updates: yow! Those trigs are scary high, never mind the cholesterol. Better lay off the mai tais and see your doctor. When mine got that high I was put on gemfibrozil. Weight loss, eating less high glycemic carbs and exercise drove my TG's down below 100.

3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on September 03, 2013
at 01:25 PM

Yeah, I didn't like those numbers. Ever since eating paleo, my triglycerides dropped to the low hundreds. I've had them in the double digits before, but I apparently have a genetic predisposition to produce a lot. Now that vacation and this experiment is over, I know my numbers are getting back to (my) normal. I feel a million times better, too. I forgot how much sugar sucks (after you're done eating/drinking it).

0
742ff8ba4ff55e84593ede14ac1c3cab

(3536)

on August 09, 2013
at 11:38 PM

What are your main sources of fat? I don't eat dairy and most of my fat comes from cashews, olive oil, avocadoes, and beef fat, and my total cholesterol was very low. How about fiber? Fiber is known to lower cholesterol. I personally get in about 40-55 grams daily, another reason my cholesterol could have been so low.

3d58b5fb4f9780e2f47d4dcc53338a5a

(2771)

on August 12, 2013
at 03:58 PM

Most of my fat comes from either animal sources or coconut oil, which I sometimes put in my morning coffee. A little will come from cheese and kefir, but that's not very often. I had some beef patties and some potatoes before my initial fast, and then nothing for the following 24 hours, so I don't think dairy was involved with anything.

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