2

votes

So, what happens to dietary cholesterol?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created October 13, 2012 at 6:25 AM

From this webpoage:

http://www.zoeharcombe.com/2012/06/why-hasnt-my-healthy-diet-cut-my-cholesterol/

"Not only the liver produces cholesterol ??? every cell of the body produces cholesterol."

"There???s no connection whatsoever between cholesterol in food and cholesterol in blood..."

So, does it matter at all if folks eat a low cholesterol diet, or eat a high cholesterol diet?

What happens to the dietary cholesterol we do eat?

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on October 14, 2012
at 04:16 PM

Incorrect. Cholesterol doesn't linger around in the blood or arteries unless your arteries, veins or body are inflamed. If you've got a lot of cholesterol in your blood, more than one should, you've got inflammation going on. Cholesterol is used for structure of cell membranes and production of hormones+neurotransmitters.

81181cab058dd652659e4bb2e6f25843

(528)

on October 13, 2012
at 07:06 PM

So you could get ~ %17 to %20 / day. I stand corrected dmi, thank you. The thrust I want to convey is that between the multiple feedback loops and compounding inefficiency of absorption/extraction/absorption it is nearly impossible to attempt to change your cholesterol levels through dietary cholesterol intake.

81181cab058dd652659e4bb2e6f25843

(528)

on October 13, 2012
at 07:01 PM

From what I've read about %50 of free dietary cholesterol is absorbed, >>%50 of ingested cholesterol is esterified, of which only a certain amount is hydrolyzed into free form which is in turn subject to the ~%50 free absorption rate of the individual. For simplicity, if you take in 500 mg (high) < %25 absorbed initially as UC and ~%50 of the > %50 CE gets converts to UC which then ~%50 is also absorbed. this is ~125mg + 63mg = ~200mg/day (this is the upper estimate) of that amount a significant portion is re-excreted into bile, which then can get reabsorbed later.

1b47e0a6d7984e33e59581d8364cc3dd

(716)

on October 13, 2012
at 04:46 PM

I meant it's wrong in the sense that of course cholesterol from food can end up in the blood. But I understand now that the quote was probably about the cholesterol levels, not the cholesterol itself. According to this, 34-57% of the dietary cholesterol is absorbed, so it's not such an insignificant amount: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/07853899009147241

  • Cbda678b2a6bf0537d8c4ea0ce8aa9ad

    asked by

    (4319)
  • Views
    2.4K
  • Last Activity
    1409D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

2 Answers

4
81181cab058dd652659e4bb2e6f25843

(528)

on October 13, 2012
at 01:49 PM

"There???s no connection whatsoever between cholesterol in food and cholesterol in blood..."

"That is clearly wrong; dietary cholesterol is perfectly digestible and ends up in the blood. The liver than adjust to produce more or less cholesterol, depending on how much is supplied exogenously."

dmi just basically said "This is clearly wrong because it is clearly right." Since the liver has a very sensitive feedback system there really is an extremely weak to no correlation between blood cholesterol and dietary cholesterol.

As far as I know, (someone please correct me if I'm misleading) much of the dietary cholesterol we ingest is esterified which means we simply excrete it in our stool instead of absorbing it in any way. Any remaining cholesterol that is unesterified and absorbed is (most likely) such and insignificant amount compared to the amount our bodies use daily (1.2-1.5g) that even if the liver's feedback mechanism failed it would still have little to no affect on our blood C levels.

1b47e0a6d7984e33e59581d8364cc3dd

(716)

on October 13, 2012
at 04:46 PM

I meant it's wrong in the sense that of course cholesterol from food can end up in the blood. But I understand now that the quote was probably about the cholesterol levels, not the cholesterol itself. According to this, 34-57% of the dietary cholesterol is absorbed, so it's not such an insignificant amount: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/07853899009147241

81181cab058dd652659e4bb2e6f25843

(528)

on October 13, 2012
at 07:01 PM

From what I've read about %50 of free dietary cholesterol is absorbed, >>%50 of ingested cholesterol is esterified, of which only a certain amount is hydrolyzed into free form which is in turn subject to the ~%50 free absorption rate of the individual. For simplicity, if you take in 500 mg (high) < %25 absorbed initially as UC and ~%50 of the > %50 CE gets converts to UC which then ~%50 is also absorbed. this is ~125mg + 63mg = ~200mg/day (this is the upper estimate) of that amount a significant portion is re-excreted into bile, which then can get reabsorbed later.

81181cab058dd652659e4bb2e6f25843

(528)

on October 13, 2012
at 07:06 PM

So you could get ~ %17 to %20 / day. I stand corrected dmi, thank you. The thrust I want to convey is that between the multiple feedback loops and compounding inefficiency of absorption/extraction/absorption it is nearly impossible to attempt to change your cholesterol levels through dietary cholesterol intake.

1
1b47e0a6d7984e33e59581d8364cc3dd

(716)

on October 13, 2012
at 08:54 AM

"There???s no connection whatsoever between cholesterol in food and cholesterol in blood..."

That is clearly wrong; dietary cholesterol is perfectly digestible and ends up in the blood. The liver than adjust to produce more or less cholesterol, depending on how much is supplied exogenously.

So no, in theory it should not matter much whether you eat much or little cholesterol. I'm not sure what happens when you eat way too much cholesterol. The body produces about 1 gram of cholesterol daily, now suppose you eat 2-3 grams from diet, even if the body lowers production to 0 grams, you still have a pretty big surplus from diet -- the interesting question is, what happens with this surplus? Does it pile up in the blood?

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on October 14, 2012
at 04:16 PM

Incorrect. Cholesterol doesn't linger around in the blood or arteries unless your arteries, veins or body are inflamed. If you've got a lot of cholesterol in your blood, more than one should, you've got inflammation going on. Cholesterol is used for structure of cell membranes and production of hormones+neurotransmitters.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!