2

votes

Oxidized cholesterol

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 07, 2013 at 12:44 AM

I know this has been asked before but I'm interested in some fresh opinions in light of recent theory: does "oxidation" of cholesterol occur in cooking foods such that they should be consumed raw...or minimally exposed to oxygen(eg. raw yolks or boiled eggs, or cooking without breaking the yolks as opposed to srambling). Does exogenous oxidation(if any exists at all) have a harmful(and if so how) influence on health(eg. endogenous cholesterol levels)? New opinions and experiences on this topic please. P.S: This issue arose in my mind after I had to consume scrambled eggs in place of my usual raw yolks...I felt different during the time when this change occured but am unsure whether it can be attributed to this dietary change(all things in my life were the same otherwise EXCEPT cooking beef fat on low for 24 hours then letting in congeal in the fridge and consuming it the next day over a couple of meals as a replacement for my regular 'dosage' of fat content in a meal).

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 24, 2011
at 12:53 AM

Very interesting! Fun reading. :-))

  • Ab683482ea62867b0c9c2c165ab734b2

    asked by

    (46)
  • Views
    4.9K
  • Last Activity
    1552D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

3 Answers

3
Medium avatar

(19479)

on November 24, 2011
at 12:49 AM

Egg yolks contain antioxidants (their yellow color is a byproduct of this fact), saturated fat, and a protective shell/membrane/"white", making the cholesterol in them fairly resistant to oxidation prior to cooking.

So, assuming that little of the cholesterol in an egg is starting off oxidized, the relatively low heat and surface area exposure that occurs during scrambling is unlikely to oxidize a significant portion of the cholesterol. On the other hand, if you were using dried egg yolks prepared in an industrial spray dryer (described in the schematic below), then you might need to worry about oxidized cholesterol.

When it comes to "scrambled" vs "sunny side up", however, proteins in the yolk are denatured (i.e. change shape) which may have altered their digestibility for you, however I would be more inclined to think that you might have simply felt different that day for reasons unrelated to your diet.

oxidized-cholesterol

Laboratory-scale spray dryer. A=Solution or suspension to be dried in, B=Atomization gas in, 1= Drying gas in, 2=Heating of drying gas, 3=Spraying of solution or suspension, 4=Drying chamber, 5=Part between drying chamber and cyclone, 6=Cyclone, 7=Drying gas is taken away, 8=Collection vessel of product, arrows mean that this is co-current lab-spraydryer

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 24, 2011
at 12:53 AM

Very interesting! Fun reading. :-))

1
103a639b040a17bb579084287f2a5307

on March 01, 2012
at 04:54 PM

When you ate the scrambled eggs, did you eat the white as well as the yolk? It appears from your post that you normally only consume the yolk (correct me if I'm wrong). I think that the most likely reason that you felt different after eating the scrambled eggs was that you consumed the yolk. Many people (myself included) don't digest the whites very well, whereas the yolks are digested just fine.

1
D12142c8cafb16d9af10b3362cb8fb62

(1590)

on November 24, 2011
at 12:49 AM

A boiled egg won't have oxidised cholesterol (or minimal). I guess the same is true for unbroken yolks.

As for scrambling; I don't think you're going to cause a huge amount of harm but it would likely oxidise a large amount of the cholesterol.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!