2

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How to upregulate the utilization of cholesterol before it oxidizes?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 01, 2013 at 2:14 PM

How can I upregulate the utilization of cholesterol so that I use it up before it oxidizes? Would working out or taking vitamin k2, vit A, selenium or zinc help in this regard? Ice baths?

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on January 16, 2013
at 04:06 PM

Yeah I noticed that too but there are also quite a few others showing beneficial affects of curcumin on cholesterol.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on January 16, 2013
at 06:08 AM

+1 for the interesting info. I'm curious about the last tumeric paper though, it looks like there was a decrease in the number of ldl receptors. Isn't that not what we want? Maybe we don't want a lot of ldl receptors in hepatic stellate cells, but I don't know.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on January 13, 2013
at 05:17 PM

I'd also check your ferratin levels and donate blood until they're between 10 and 40.... iron oxidizes in your blood

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on January 11, 2013
at 10:38 PM

I'd +1 you several times if I could, this is an excellent answer!

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on January 02, 2013
at 12:53 AM

(con't) bear, but it can't make us live forever and be 100% free of any signs of aging (including internal glycation and oxidation). Eventually, the damage *will* get ya...Paleo can make it so that happens when you're 102 years old, instead of 58, know what I mean?

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on January 02, 2013
at 12:51 AM

You also want to keep your lipoprotein particles from becoming glycated. Best way to do that is to maintain generally low blood glucose levels. (Well, not *unhealthy/unsafe low,* just not elevated like the average carb-gorging eater out there.) Oxidation and glycation are normal, natural processes. They are going to happen inside us whether we like it or not. The key is to minimize the extent...avoid too many easily-oxidized PUFAs (the fatty acids in those lipoprotein membranes have to come from somewhere) & chronically high blood glucose levels. Paleo can keep us healthier than the average...

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on January 01, 2013
at 04:07 PM

I was reading some of Chris Masterjohn's articles along with some webmd papers and I'm under the impression that I want plenty of non-oxidized LDL cholesterols circulating in my blood for optimal function.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on January 01, 2013
at 02:57 PM

Copper. http://perfecthealthdiet.com/category/nutrients/copper/

Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on January 01, 2013
at 02:46 PM

I would have a look into what the purpose of cholesterol is in the body. I suppose then it would be to maximise activity that needs cholesterol, i.e. cell growth and recovery.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 01, 2013
at 02:45 PM

What an odd question... what are you trying to accomplish?

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on January 01, 2013
at 02:40 PM

HIIT? Resistance training?

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3 Answers

best answer

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on January 11, 2013
at 10:38 PM

I'd +1 you several times if I could, this is an excellent answer!

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on January 13, 2013
at 05:17 PM

I'd also check your ferratin levels and donate blood until they're between 10 and 40.... iron oxidizes in your blood

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on January 16, 2013
at 04:06 PM

Yeah I noticed that too but there are also quite a few others showing beneficial affects of curcumin on cholesterol.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on January 16, 2013
at 06:08 AM

+1 for the interesting info. I'm curious about the last tumeric paper though, it looks like there was a decrease in the number of ldl receptors. Isn't that not what we want? Maybe we don't want a lot of ldl receptors in hepatic stellate cells, but I don't know.

2
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 16, 2013
at 12:45 PM

Biology is constantly fighting a (losing) battle against oxidation. Luckily, our bodies can put up quite a fight before the oxidative damage is too much to handle. Ramp up endogenous antioxidants, the big one being glutathione - eat your meat, get plenty of B-vitamins.

The same goes for glycation. It's happening constantly even at normal blood glucose levels - nobody has glycated hemoglobin values of 0%, normal numbers are around 4%, you can't get away from that. Eventually, glycation catches up with us, too much accumulated damage that cannot be regenerated. Then you have cancer, inflammatory disease, Alzheimers, etc... Keeping your blood sugar normal is as good as one can do as far as I've seen. There might be a better-living-through-science answer out there though.

2
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on January 16, 2013
at 06:31 AM

There was an interesting paper that came out a while back reporting that a micro RNA from plants (mRNA 168a I believe), found in rice, potatoes, some brassica vegetables like broccoli, and who knows what other plants inhibited the expression of LDL receptor adapter protein 1 and increased cholesterol levels in rodents. I can't find the paper at the moment, but I'll link it when I do.

Avoiding endotoxemia also seems be helpful in keeping LDL receptors active:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/hep.510300524/abstract

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1216992/

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006291X0801351X

Conjugated linoleic acid may be good too:

http://www.jlr.org/content/47/12/2647.short

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