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Has anyone had blood work done for the use of getting a LIFE insurance policy?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 22, 2011 at 10:30 PM

I am thinking about getting a life insurance policy, and for the amount I have requested, a person will be sent to my house on behalf of the insurance company to draw blood and take a urine test. On the telephone interview I qualified for a smaller life insurance policy based on my answers only (no medical exam required)

Now, don't get me wrong, I will pass this with flying colors I AM SURE of this. I checked my last labs results from my last doctor's office visit which was last summer, BUT they did not check my cholesterol nor did I have a fasting blood glucose test. I asked for a Vit D to be tested and nope, they wouldn't run that either (doctor said it was not needed, ya know, gave me the RDA of Vit D.) but I was curious. So, I don't know what they will be looking for exactly. I am not thinking I will die of an illness either--(accident could happen though)

I don't know if LIFE insurance people are biased about cholesterol levels and I don't know what mine is. But in the past (pre paleo years) it was considered very good.

Another question they asked me was: Has anyone in your immediate family die of heart disease?That answer is no. However, my mom who is still alive smoked for 50+ years. So, if I had said yes for example would I be not eligible without even be able to say she smoked most of her life? Ya know what I mean.?

I feel like the "Results" of this test will stick with me forever in the life insurance world.

04293f705870e1837b8670d3c1cd5f67

(2261)

on May 19, 2011
at 09:03 PM

I just got word from the LIFE insurance co that I WAS approved. I am in the "SUPER PREFERRED" rate, only top 5% get this rate. She said I had a an "awesome" profile. She is sending results. I KNEW IT!! :)

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on March 24, 2011
at 02:57 AM

Hmmm, it's just one report, but apparently fasting is NOT good for total cholesterol, at least after 24 hours: http://jn.nutrition.org/content/129/11/2005.full I suspect there is a U-shaped response. Initially lipids drop, then once your body enters "starvation mode", they rebound as fat cells begin liberating their stores. At least, that's my guess. In any case, always a good thing to verify with research before trusting what any joker on the internet has to say. ;-)

2b3edde3c7b9393fe36a2dd9c8acf473

(284)

on March 23, 2011
at 09:54 PM

This has always mystified me. You would think pure profit motive would cause life insurance companies to discard the lipid hypothesis. It makes me want to start one myself. Also, you'd think someone would make pretty decent money running a health insurance company that refused to pay for things like diabetes supplies for patients whose doctors are instructing them to eat the AHA diet. Alas, since 1945 insurance business are exempt from antitrust laws.

04293f705870e1837b8670d3c1cd5f67

(2261)

on March 23, 2011
at 04:18 AM

I think I will check before "THEY" do.. :)

04293f705870e1837b8670d3c1cd5f67

(2261)

on March 23, 2011
at 04:17 AM

wondered what a fast would do to a test like that?

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on March 23, 2011
at 12:18 AM

They laughed at me......seriously

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7 Answers

1
5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

on March 23, 2011
at 03:14 AM

Couldn't one game the test by doing a pronounced, ie. 24-48 hrs, fast prior to the blood draw? I'd think any Paleo-er worth their salt should be able to swing a 48 hr fast, especially if a few hundred dollars are at stake.

04293f705870e1837b8670d3c1cd5f67

(2261)

on March 23, 2011
at 04:17 AM

wondered what a fast would do to a test like that?

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on March 24, 2011
at 02:57 AM

Hmmm, it's just one report, but apparently fasting is NOT good for total cholesterol, at least after 24 hours: http://jn.nutrition.org/content/129/11/2005.full I suspect there is a U-shaped response. Initially lipids drop, then once your body enters "starvation mode", they rebound as fat cells begin liberating their stores. At least, that's my guess. In any case, always a good thing to verify with research before trusting what any joker on the internet has to say. ;-)

1
Medium avatar

on March 22, 2011
at 11:58 PM

You'd think that insurances companies, who are monetarily interested in actual risk would be concerned about the validity of these numbers. In fact, I bet if insurance data were to be mined for correlations, you would see a conclusive disproving of the lipid hypothesis, absent any info from scientific papers.

2b3edde3c7b9393fe36a2dd9c8acf473

(284)

on March 23, 2011
at 09:54 PM

This has always mystified me. You would think pure profit motive would cause life insurance companies to discard the lipid hypothesis. It makes me want to start one myself. Also, you'd think someone would make pretty decent money running a health insurance company that refused to pay for things like diabetes supplies for patients whose doctors are instructing them to eat the AHA diet. Alas, since 1945 insurance business are exempt from antitrust laws.

0
8f4ff12a53a98f3b5814cfe242de0daa

(1075)

on March 23, 2011
at 12:44 AM

It could be a problem, and an insurance company is not going to debate the merits of their particular test criteria with you (you can challenge it, but they probably won't care unless your just requesting a retest).

Checking ahead of time and spending the 6weeks or so it takes might be in order if you really care about "passing". And it is possible they would not consider someone smoking and getting heart disease a moderating factor, as it would also mean you were exposed 2nd hand.

04293f705870e1837b8670d3c1cd5f67

(2261)

on March 23, 2011
at 04:18 AM

I think I will check before "THEY" do.. :)

0
03d5a967b935e1e8ef202f313467878f

(485)

on March 23, 2011
at 12:16 AM

Yup, had life insurance blood work while fully paleo about a year ago. They did give me a lipid profile but not particle size. I don't think you will have issues because your triglycerides will most likely be nice and low (mine was 53).

0
C77669135b45421f8b7fa35bddefea51

(58)

on March 23, 2011
at 12:15 AM

My life insurance policy said total cholesterol had to be below 200 or I must have been on a statin for 2 years at the time of the test before they would give me the "preferred" rate.

0
62482b6c46233690c88915dd43003546

(75)

on March 22, 2011
at 11:42 PM

I just had my blood drawn (and the urine sample taken) for this very same issue. I was told on the phone that they're looking for total cholesterol/HDL ratio but I haven't been able to get a good answer on what the total cholesterol number is made up with.

I was already planning on getting some additional blood work done that covers a wider range of data points (AC1, LDL particle size, etc.) and was informed that I could challenge any results from their test when I asked.

My fear is that total cholesterol includes the LDL count but does not take particle size into consideration. Having been eating paleo for a couple months over a year now, I don't think it unreasonable for me to have an elevated LDL level that consists of the large, fluffy kind. I grind my teeth thinking that this would be used against me.

So, I'll get my extra blood work done (though privatemdlabs.com I think) to get a better picture of my overall health and allow me to defend my numbers.

Luckily I didn't have to do some kind of blood glucose test -- don't get me started on how my fat burning adapted body would react to that!

0
8f24c914fa9538f3a9460e9a782c0d7d

on March 22, 2011
at 10:31 PM

They DO seem to look at ratios, but yeah, Total Cholesterol is definitely factored in there.

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