1

votes

Hack my blood test results -- very high HDL

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 01, 2013 at 3:06 PM

Soooooo....since people on this board seem to be more than willing to look at blood test results, I'd love the group's though here.

30yo Female, 5'5" 150 lbs Crossfitter, long-distance runner

blood pressure: 110/70 pulse: 55 bpm LDL: 104 HDL: 148 Tri-gylercides 45

total cholesterol 261

glucose 95

Should I be worried about 148, or is that just all the fish oil I've been taking? My doctor wants to do a retest; should I cut back on fish oil so I don't have to keep getting my arm poked?

I saw that chronic alcoholism can cause high HDL, and I admit that every so often I overdo it with the booze (like a 4th of July wedding I was recently at...shame), but I don't think I'm anywhere near "chronic alcoholism," anyway my tri-gylercides would probably be high as well if that were the case.

Thoughts out there? Anyone else hit this high of HDL as well, and has a thought on most likely cause?

D396b126240f584bc358e6e4fd84e9e3

(455)

on August 05, 2013
at 03:36 PM

I would still get your CRP checked.

B2bc3b2efbbb040aef2c9f11bdbd061b

(5)

on August 02, 2013
at 12:44 PM

It appears to be genetic on my mother's side -- thank you for your help!

B2bc3b2efbbb040aef2c9f11bdbd061b

(5)

on August 02, 2013
at 12:43 PM

Thank you everyone for your help -- I checked with my mother, and it turns out it's genetic. She had mentioned something about odd cholesterol results a while back, so I checked with her. Turns out her last HDL was 144 -- so right on target. Fortunately, she's had no signs of heart disease so I shouldn't need to worry just yet. Thank you!

Bad3a78e228c67a7513c28f17c36b3cf

(1387)

on August 01, 2013
at 08:06 PM

I forgot to add, centenarians have been found to have super high HDL levels. http://blogs.wsj.com/metropolis/2011/07/13/in-the-science-of-aging-oldest-new-yorkers-hold-the-key/

D396b126240f584bc358e6e4fd84e9e3

(455)

on August 01, 2013
at 04:11 PM

More worthless commentary from SUSTAINEDfitness.

C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on August 01, 2013
at 04:01 PM

Be careful. With numbers like that, how are you ever going to develop heart disease?

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6 Answers

4
D396b126240f584bc358e6e4fd84e9e3

on August 01, 2013
at 04:05 PM

According to Paul Jaminet and Chris Kresser, abnormally high HDL can be indicative of disease if there are also indicators of inflammation or immune system dysregulation.

"I tend to view HDL >85 or 90 in the presence of other inflammatory or immunological markers as a potential sign of infection or immune dysregulation"

"I frequently see HDL >100 in patients with several other markers of inflammation, such as elevated CRP, ferritin, WBC, monocytes, etc."

More info here: http://perfecthealthdiet.com/2011/04/how-to-raise-hdl/

2
Bad3a78e228c67a7513c28f17c36b3cf

(1387)

on August 01, 2013
at 07:34 PM

I have similar numbers. HDL 114, LDL 104, triglycerides 37. I'm 54, female, active, although I no longer run. (I read somewhere that a lot of regular aerobic exercise can elevate hdl-might be a factor for you). Mine has been near 100 since I've been getting it tested, about 15 years. I don't take fish oil, as per Jaminet's recommendation in the Perfect Health Diet. My mother and grandmother both had high HDL, although not nearly as high as mine, so I imagine there can be a genetic aspect. My CRP and white blood cell count are on the low side, so there is no obvious inflammation or infection. Nonetheless, my own suspicion is that very high hdl is the body's response to something that is out of alignment. It doesn't seem to be very common or have been studied much though, so just a guess on my part.

B2bc3b2efbbb040aef2c9f11bdbd061b

(5)

on August 02, 2013
at 12:44 PM

It appears to be genetic on my mother's side -- thank you for your help!

Bad3a78e228c67a7513c28f17c36b3cf

(1387)

on August 01, 2013
at 08:06 PM

I forgot to add, centenarians have been found to have super high HDL levels. http://blogs.wsj.com/metropolis/2011/07/13/in-the-science-of-aging-oldest-new-yorkers-hold-the-key/

1
A2f6a1fba0452e96f7f97325c8da3934

(60)

on August 01, 2013
at 08:28 PM

In addition to what kevin said, high hdl and lower ldl can be caused by a (fairly rare) mutation of the cetp (cholestryl ester transport protein) gene which has been associated with increased heart disease risk.

http://m.circ.ahajournals.org/content/101/16/1907.short

I'd be interested if this lipid panel has changed or if this high hdl has been a preexisting phenomena.

Again, this type of mutation is fairly rare but it wouldn't be in the spirit of paleohacks if people didn't tell you every possible thing that could be wrong with you =P

1
8d3cb0be5f31c75a05f853cb3b5c245a

(1601)

on August 01, 2013
at 07:46 PM

It's really hard to say. Perhaps you have a genetic disposition, or perhaps you have hyperthyroidism. (Just speculating since on the flip side, hypothyroidism can cause elevated LDL)

Are you restricting carbohydrates? Downing a cup of coconut oil a day? Supplementing K2, magnesium, or supplementing otherwise? Is your thyroid in decent shape? Is your blood sugar in decent shape (i.e. is that a fasting number or post-prandial or what?)?

I wonder if you have deficiencies in copper, manganese, or some other nutrients? For example, do you eat dark chocolate (30 g / day) and ~1/3 lb beef/lamb liver every week?

Copper paper and cholesterol: http://jn.nutrition.org/content/116/9/1735.full.pdf

Manganese paper and cholesterol: http://jn.nutrition.org/content/113/2/328.full.pdf

I would recommend the perfect health diet supplementation program, just because even eating paleo, you can still miss out on some important minerals and nutrients.

good luck! would like to know what it is, if you ever bring it down.

1
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on August 01, 2013
at 06:00 PM

I have heard that HDL that is very high MAY be indicative of a problem, as mentioned above. Ask your doctor to include an hsCRP in your next bloodwork, as that is a marker for inflammation. If you don't have any inflammation, I wouldn't worry about it.

1
235e74b9adb57eff80592f064e1d298b

on August 01, 2013
at 03:18 PM

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cholesterol-levels/CL00001

I think you are in a perfect place health wise... The link above will show you that. HDL last time I checked was the good stuff and anything over 60 is Ideal. Not sure if it can be too high or not, I'm guessing it can be but yours is just fine.

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