7

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Does cholesterol oxides in ghee make it worse to cook with than olive oil?

Commented on November 07, 2014
Created February 14, 2012 at 1:28 AM

I am asking this question due to an earlier thread regarding ghee. One of the paleohacks usuers put a link to a study saying that ghee contains significant number cholesterol oxides (12.3% of sterols). So which is better to cook with? Or is straight pastured butter better than both olive oil and ghee when it comes to cooking?

20203f15287a14924c714eb68a34ce6c

(596)

on January 08, 2013
at 08:02 AM

Yeah, putting some sense in this! I've been quite anoyed by all the rant on oxidation. 3 minutes styr fry some egg will neither oxidixe the butter neither the yolks, tough i' d rather have my raw sunny side uo.

Ef089e1180f240aa9fd2d089f7f38b45

(279)

on February 16, 2012
at 06:10 PM

So is the author of the article in the link. Quoting its conclusion "This indicates to me that normal ghee is indeed relatively free of oxidized cholesterol. "

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on February 16, 2012
at 02:32 PM

Wrong. The poster is talking about oxidized cholesterol within the ghee. He/she is right. Your link addresses of how consuming ghee affects serum lipid levels (in rats). Apples and oranges.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on February 15, 2012
at 12:55 PM

You have to be smart about using olive oil in cooking. It's not some BAM! oxidized PUFAs. It's a slow process, time and temperature dependent.

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8 Answers

3
D07a525f9021f8d72bf6aaa52893c795

(1011)

on February 15, 2012
at 02:33 PM

In Germany, you can get "Butterschmalz" - which is ghee, but is processed under nitrogen, so no oxidation..

I tend NOT to cook with it, but throw it into a stew prior to serving or add to steamed veggies.

If you want to fry, and remember at the higher temperatures of the frying process, rapid oxidation does occur, then the oil to use, par excellence, is coconut oil, followed by palm oil, which although it has an appreciable PUFA content, has a higher smoke point than coconut oil.

In summary, don't fry - steam or simmer. Use healthy fats and oils as condiments.

2
37785319aa7f7cbfeb14284a46f91fd6

on January 08, 2013
at 07:25 AM

Ghee has a 485 degree smokepoint and will not breakdown like other oils and fats do, but remains stable. Ghee and Coconut oil are the only two edible oils known to be able to withstand incredibly high smoke points safely. Olive oils has a much lower smoke point and you should be careful heating it. Some sources say you should not heat it at all but use it for dressings, etc. Most vegetable oils are considered fragile.

The reason ghee is becoming so popular, is because of its endless healing benefits AND the fact that you can cook with it, bake with it, simmer, fry, saute, and it will not hydrogenate or breakdown. It actually helps cleanse the liver and strengthen it. And it makes all of your food taste great.

Keep eating ghee and Enjoy!! Much Love, Mama Sattva mamasattva.com

2
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on February 15, 2012
at 12:53 PM

That looks like a number I posted a while back. Ghee vs butter? Ghee is going to be more oxidized than butter for sure, it's cooked and processed. Vs olive oil? Well, there's no cholesterol to oxidize there, but twice as many PUFAs. Pick your poison.

While cooking any PUFA will cause some oxidation, there's a difference between stove-top cooking and industrial food oil refinement. It's a matter of making mountains out of molehills.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on November 07, 2014
at 02:48 PM

What's wrong? Ghee is processed… it has significant amounts of oxidized cholesterol. These are facts, supported by the scientific literature. As I posted this nearly 3 years ago, I'm even less worried about PUFAs and cooking… would actually favor olive oil now more than ever. 

F379e1dac741a82580f37928b500e26a

on November 07, 2014
at 02:42 PM

Please, MATT_11 before posting any of those wrong things, try to do more researches, here is an easy to read article with sources at the end of what is been said about GHEE.

Ghee is healthy and does contain little amount of oxidized cholesterol (1.3%)

20203f15287a14924c714eb68a34ce6c

(596)

on January 08, 2013
at 08:02 AM

Yeah, putting some sense in this! I've been quite anoyed by all the rant on oxidation. 3 minutes styr fry some egg will neither oxidixe the butter neither the yolks, tough i' d rather have my raw sunny side uo.

1
4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on February 16, 2012
at 02:34 PM

You can make your own ghee from butter and, if you add herbs and spices prior to cooking, I'm pretty damn sure you won't end up with nearly as much oxidized cholesterol. Try, for example, rosemary, oregano, or turmeric.

1
Ef089e1180f240aa9fd2d089f7f38b45

(279)

on February 14, 2012
at 12:10 PM

While some previous Paleohacks posts also mention this article (see http://paleohacks.com/questions/21705/ghee-vs-raw-butter#axzz1j6WWDVQg), it seems like it all depends on how the Ghee was prepared (see http://freeradicalfederation.com/GheeLowersCholesterol): the quality Ghee seem to be healthy free from these oxides. So you should prefer quality Ghee to butter if you have problems with dairy and want to avoid casein. However, if you are tolerant to butter it may be more nutritious (read for example Dave Asprey of the Bulletproof diet - he suggests butter over ghee).

However, don't use olive oil for cooking: it oxidizes its PUFAs.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on February 15, 2012
at 12:55 PM

You have to be smart about using olive oil in cooking. It's not some BAM! oxidized PUFAs. It's a slow process, time and temperature dependent.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on February 16, 2012
at 02:32 PM

Wrong. The poster is talking about oxidized cholesterol within the ghee. He/she is right. Your link addresses of how consuming ghee affects serum lipid levels (in rats). Apples and oranges.

Ef089e1180f240aa9fd2d089f7f38b45

(279)

on February 16, 2012
at 06:10 PM

So is the author of the article in the link. Quoting its conclusion "This indicates to me that normal ghee is indeed relatively free of oxidized cholesterol. "

0
4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on February 16, 2012
at 02:41 PM

You can make your own ghee from butter and, if you add herbs and spices prior to cooking, I'm pretty damn sure you won't end up with nearly as much oxidized cholesterol. Try, for example, rosemary, oregano, or turmeric.

0
79b187d791eae49070a90d6ca7ee5547

on February 16, 2012
at 02:18 PM

Let's not forget lard and beef tallow for deep frying. According to Sallon Fallon Morrell of westonaprice.org, these are the most stable for frying, even more so than coconut oil. Olive oil should only be used to sauteing and never should be brought to high temperatures.

-4
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 15, 2012
at 06:10 AM

My cousin with similar problems told me that he found on http://cholesterol-lower.info/ the help for his problems.I heard the tips from here are very goo to combat cholesterol problems. I hope this helps.

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