0

votes

Confused about ApoB Units

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 29, 2013 at 4:42 AM

Can anyone tell me how to convert/interpret Apo B test results.

My test result was 2.0, but it doesn't say what the units are. I've been searching the web and found a conversion between g/L and mg/dl, which converts my number to 2000, but I can't find out what units are used in Canada vs the US so I'm totally confused.

I have seen other peoples results in the neighbourhood of 150 to 200, and was listening to Dr Dayspring on Ask the Low Carb experts, quoting numbers of 1000 to 2000.

My guess is that 2.0 = 200 = 2000, (units unknown). Can any one confirm if my guess is correct?

6c75689340db7a8e128af148465f5205

(25)

on February 02, 2013
at 05:53 AM

Hey April, Thanks so much for clearing that up. I didn't think the ApoA was a key indicator. Last test it was 1.67......this is the typical ApoA that gets tested with ApoB, right? My rough understanding is that ApoB proteins are attached to almost all cholesterol particles so it gives a close but not 100% idea of what your particle count would be. ApoA is attached to HDL's only I think.

  • 6c75689340db7a8e128af148465f5205

    asked by

    (25)
  • Views
    2.8K
  • Last Activity
    1432D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

1 Answers

1
Medium avatar

(10663)

on January 29, 2013
at 05:14 AM

I'm guessing your test result of 2.0 is in g/L. And converting that to mg/dL would be 200, not 2000. I think Canada uses g/L, while US uses mg/dL.

Normal ApoB levels are 40 to 125 mg/dL (or 0.4 to 1.25 g/L).

This study conducted in Canada found that concentrations of <1.04 g/L indicates a low risk of CHD/CAD; 1.04-1.22 g/L has a moderate risk; 1.22-1.40 g/L has a high risk; and >1.40 g/L has a very high risk.

Don't be too alarmed that 2.0 g/L might predict that you have an extremely high risk of heart disease. There are still a lot of inconsistencies and inconclusive data with ApoB. What might be a little more helpful is if you also got your ApoA-1 test and looked at the ApoB to ApoA-1 ratio.

6c75689340db7a8e128af148465f5205

(25)

on February 02, 2013
at 05:53 AM

Hey April, Thanks so much for clearing that up. I didn't think the ApoA was a key indicator. Last test it was 1.67......this is the typical ApoA that gets tested with ApoB, right? My rough understanding is that ApoB proteins are attached to almost all cholesterol particles so it gives a close but not 100% idea of what your particle count would be. ApoA is attached to HDL's only I think.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!