0

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Blood Tests Results = My Doctor Is A Dumbass

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 03, 2012 at 9:45 AM

I got a 'full panel' done recently (it was not 'full' at all) and my doctor just said everything is normal but my cholesterol is high and my LDL is not good. Cut down on your fat intake.

He also was unable to tell me the metrics of the numbers. 30.1 Testosterone what?? What a clown.

Just have a look.

Bone Profile

  • Albumin 43
  • Alkaline Phospate 45
  • Calcium 2.26
  • Phospate 1.06

Cortisol

  • Cortisol 276

Glucose Test

  • Fasting Glucose 5.3
  • Cholesterol 6.46
  • HDL % Cholesterol 2.8
  • HDL Cholesterol 2.29
  • LDL Cholesterol 3.68
  • Non-HDL Cholesterol 4.17
  • Triglycerides 1.07

Liver Function Test

  • Albumin 43
  • Alkaline Phospate 45
  • AST 23
  • BilirubinKeep 15
  • GGT 11
  • LDH 364
  • Total Protein 68

Testosterone

  • Testosterone 30.1

Thyroid Function Test

  • Free T4 18.1
  • TSH 2.4

I am not so worried about 'cholesterol' but I was surprised about LDL. Can anyone tell me the possible metrics for these numbers?

30.1 Testosterone is a strange number, can't find a measurement related to that kind of range.

Thanks Guys.

9d741bcbe702044635f2ce3078043054

(1435)

on July 24, 2012
at 08:09 PM

Only a very small fraction of our bodily cholesterol comes from what we eat. What an inane comment. As someone else pointed out, mortality is higher when total cholesterol is below 200 than it is for the 220-250 range.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on July 24, 2012
at 04:13 PM

Actually, Dave S, you are incorrect. Half of all doctors are not below average (by defnition). Half of all doctors are below the median, by defitiion.

11b7b7ba720a5cd43c74a0ef99a16adb

(3448)

on July 24, 2012
at 01:31 PM

The liver has the capacity to produce 100% of your cholesterol needs. If you limit your cholesterol intake, it makes more. If you increase your cholesterol intake, your liver makes less. Statins inhibit the liver's ability to make cholesterol. This is why taking statins is the ONLY method that works to reduce cholesterol levels. The only thing you accomplish by reducing your cholesterol intake is to make your liver ramp up its production of cholesterol. When looked at from that standpoint, it's actually healthier--for your liver--to eat more cholesterol as it puts less of a load on your liver.

11b7b7ba720a5cd43c74a0ef99a16adb

(3448)

on July 24, 2012
at 01:24 PM

"There's no connection whatsoever between cholesterol in food and cholesterol in blood. And we've known that all along. Cholesterol in the diet doesn't matter at all unless you happen to be a chicken or a rabbit." Ancel Keys, 1997

11b7b7ba720a5cd43c74a0ef99a16adb

(3448)

on July 24, 2012
at 01:24 PM

"In the adult man the serum cholesterol level is essentially independent of the cholesterol intake over the whole range of human diets." - Ancel Keys, 1956

8c9ea35de2f7a0e7741bd8b2552aed74

on July 18, 2012
at 06:58 PM

What's the calculation for the ratio?

8c9ea35de2f7a0e7741bd8b2552aed74

on July 18, 2012
at 06:46 PM

Thanks for the conversion Tery James, I appreciate it. I am on a high cholesterol diet; it allows me to kick down doors, bang my wife everyday and I walk around with a smile on my face like the Buddha. I suggest you educate yourself on the matter right here: http://bit.ly/MsUCy5

A1a7413b99e03bc77f02d95c4170ea43

(2393)

on July 16, 2012
at 01:16 AM

Hey Spammy McSpamerson - get a life.

8c9ea35de2f7a0e7741bd8b2552aed74

on July 04, 2012
at 01:17 PM

Had a minor foot injury, this blood work was taken returning from Singapore where I was eating everything tasty under the sun. Probably threw my blood glucose off the charts. Thanks Mscott.

8c9ea35de2f7a0e7741bd8b2552aed74

on July 04, 2012
at 01:12 PM

In Ireland Dave S., Your doctor does sound like a larger dumbass than mine VB! Thanks for the comments.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on July 04, 2012
at 12:21 AM

Elevated LDH seems to occur most commonly due to things like hemolysis, necrosis, and rhabdomyolysis. Have you recently been sick, injured, overexerting yourself, or a combination of the three?

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on July 03, 2012
at 06:19 PM

You're right. I'll update the answer accordingly. Thanks.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on July 03, 2012
at 05:36 PM

Hey Mike, a different equation is used for cholesterol and trigs. I believe that 38.67 number is correct, but you need to multiply by 89 to convert trigs to mg/dl. This would make the triglycerides 95.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on July 03, 2012
at 03:23 PM

1. I really like you avatar... but why a cat? Shouldn't it be a monkey? 2. My current doctor is a dumbass too, welcome to the club. No, actually he is worse. But I am not sure I am allowed to use the words I have for him here. He tells me things that make me want to do something bad to him. Thank God I am gluten-free. If I weren't, I would be so agitated, I would demonstrate everything I learned in my boxing class. When I told him my stomach hurts after I eat, he told me... ready for this? "It is you in your head!" When I told him I had diarrhea and bloating, he told me I needed therapy. Grr

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on July 03, 2012
at 01:24 PM

Kresser recommends Trig to HDL ratio for determining what your LDL "look" like. 41:89 would indicate buoyant LDL.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on July 03, 2012
at 12:51 PM

I agree of course, but if you do put any stock in the lipid panels, I've heard Chris Masterjohn say total cholesterol to HDL ratio is best predictor of heart disease. Even without the conversion, his results can be used to calculate the ratio. And I agree, they look fine.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on July 03, 2012
at 10:44 AM

Half of all doctors are below average (by defiinition). I asked a doctor earlier this year what he could tell me about leptin. He had never heard of it. This was a family doctor with signs advertising medically assisted weight loss! By the way, what is your location?

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7 Answers

best answer

0
782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

on July 03, 2012
at 12:30 PM

It would be helpful to have the units for your lab values. If Mike T is correct, your lipid panel looks terrific. LDL values just don't mean much, IMO, without further information.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on July 03, 2012
at 01:24 PM

Kresser recommends Trig to HDL ratio for determining what your LDL "look" like. 41:89 would indicate buoyant LDL.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on July 03, 2012
at 12:51 PM

I agree of course, but if you do put any stock in the lipid panels, I've heard Chris Masterjohn say total cholesterol to HDL ratio is best predictor of heart disease. Even without the conversion, his results can be used to calculate the ratio. And I agree, they look fine.

8c9ea35de2f7a0e7741bd8b2552aed74

on July 18, 2012
at 06:58 PM

What's the calculation for the ratio?

best answer

2
Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on July 03, 2012
at 11:07 AM

Maybe your test was in mmol/L instead of mg/DL. Here is an online converter:

http://www.onlineconversion.com/cholesterol.htm

For cholesterol, you can multiply by 38.67:

Total cholesterol: 250
HDL: 89
LDL: 142

For trigs, you can multiply by 88.57:

Trigs: 95

Thanks Mscott for the clarification.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on July 03, 2012
at 05:36 PM

Hey Mike, a different equation is used for cholesterol and trigs. I believe that 38.67 number is correct, but you need to multiply by 89 to convert trigs to mg/dl. This would make the triglycerides 95.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on July 03, 2012
at 06:19 PM

You're right. I'll update the answer accordingly. Thanks.

best answer

3
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on July 03, 2012
at 07:13 PM

Here's a rundown of your test (I left out cholesterol), with added values (I made reasonable assumptions for these) and the common upper to lower limits:

  • Albumin 43 U/L (35-48 to 55)
  • Alkaline Phospate 45 IU/L (20-150)
  • Calcium 2.26 mmol/L (2.2-2.6)
  • Phospate 1.06 mmol/L (.8-1.5)
  • Cortisol 276 nmol/L (80-700, varies depending on when blood was taken)
  • Fasting glucose 5.3 (3.9-5.5)
  • Triglycerides 1.07 mmol/L (<1.70)
  • AST 23 IU/L (8-40 in males)
  • Bilirubin (keep?) 15 micromoles/L (5.1-17)
  • GGT 11 IU (15-18 in males)
  • LDH 364 IU (50-150)
  • Testosterone 30.1 nmol/L (9-38 in males)
  • Free T4 18.1 pmol/L (9 to 12-18 to 23)
  • TSH 2.4 mIU/L (.5-4.5 to 5)

Most of your values look fine. Fasting blood glucose seems a bit high (it's about 90 in mg/dl). I'd look into that. And if I used the correct values (which I think I did, but who knows) GGT seems low and LDH seems fairly high. I really don't know much about them, but I'll look into what that could mean. And I'll echo the other answers that cholesterol is probably fine.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on July 04, 2012
at 12:21 AM

Elevated LDH seems to occur most commonly due to things like hemolysis, necrosis, and rhabdomyolysis. Have you recently been sick, injured, overexerting yourself, or a combination of the three?

8c9ea35de2f7a0e7741bd8b2552aed74

on July 04, 2012
at 01:17 PM

Had a minor foot injury, this blood work was taken returning from Singapore where I was eating everything tasty under the sun. Probably threw my blood glucose off the charts. Thanks Mscott.

best answer

0
6690459d4e256da82d910376ac6c34fc

(323)

on July 04, 2012
at 08:42 AM

Hi Anthropology, I had similar results when I got my blood test, however I got the full print out.

Here's the results, hope they help you with the units & some sort of comparison.

Liver function tests (X77WP)

  • ALT/SGPT serum level (44G3.) 58 u/L
  • Serum albumin level (XE2eA) 43 g/L
  • Serum alkaline phosphatase level (XE2px) 75 u/L
  • Serum bilirubin level (44E..) 13 umol/L

Serum lipid levels (XE2q7)

  • Serum cholesterol level (XE2eD) 5.0 mmol/L
  • Serum triglyceride levels (XE2q9) 1.1 mmol/L
  • Serum HDL cholesterol level (44P5.) 1.12 mmol/L
  • Serum LDL cholesterol level (44P6.) 3.4 mmol/L
  • Total cholesterol:HDL ratio (44PF.) 4.5 1/1

Urea and electrolytes (X77VVi)

  • Serum sodium level (XE2q0) 139 mmol/L
  • Serum potassium level (XE2pz) 3.9 mmol/L
  • Serum urea level (XMOlt) 7.2 mmol/L
  • Plasma Fasting Glucose Level (44g1) 5.2 mmol/L
  • Full Blood Count (424…) Haemoglobin Concentration (Xa96v) 13.7 g/dL
  • Total white blood count (XaldY) 4.4 10*9/L
  • Platelet Count - Observation (42P) 174 10*9/L
  • Red Blood Cell Count (426) 5.26 10*12/L
  • Mean cell count (42A) 77.4 fL
  • Haematocrit (X76tb) 0.407 1/1
  • Mean cell haemoglobin level (XE2pb) 26.0 pg
  • Mean cell haemoglobin Concentration (429) 33.7 g/dL
  • Red blood cell distribution width (XW2mO) 13.30%
  • Neutrophil Count (42J) 1.88 10*9/L
  • Lymphocyte Count (42M) 1.96 10*9/L
  • Monocyte Count - observation (42N) 0.36 10*9/L
  • Eosinophil count - observation (42K) 0.21 10*9/L
  • Basophil count (42L) 0.02 10*9/L

best answer

0
B8592e62f9804ddabae73c1103d6bcb9

(1956)

on July 24, 2012
at 03:25 PM

Your cholesterol is BRILLIANT! Your doctor is indeed a dumbass.

Converted to mg/dl your cholesterol is: Total: 250 HDL: 89 LDL: 142 Tri's: 95

Lowest all-cause mortality rate is between 200 and 240/260mg/dl total choelsterol: http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-pttFtp8eZx0/T3IFYTDzEwI/AAAAAAAAAQ8/Grmm-gHD1yI/s1600/CholesterolMortality.jpg

You have lovely high HDL and low tri's. Low tri's means your LDL is most likely fluffy and not dangerous at all. The best predictor for heart disease is tri's/HDL, with under 2 being ideal; yours is 1.07 which is excellent.

0
6f1941db75786fd47800a01435343a3d

on July 24, 2012
at 01:04 PM

Please don't start me OFF about DOCTORS! I can say a lot but what is the point guys? your only gona piss yourself off & any blood test you take next will be elavated LEVELS due to the STRESS u caused your body!

-3
875bfc422be7b7e9baab37e7d27ebb25

on July 12, 2012
at 01:21 PM

Cholesterol levels are usually in mg/dL. Yours are certainly in mmol/L. Converted in mg/dL, your results are:

Total cholesterol: 249.80

HDL: 88.55

LDL: 142.30

Trigs: 94.77

These results show that your total cholesterol is high (less than 200 is ideal) and your LDL is borderline high (less than 100 is desirable). Your HDL is very good (over 70 is ideal). I will advise you to follow a low cholesterol diet to improve your levels. Check this to learn more.

A1a7413b99e03bc77f02d95c4170ea43

(2393)

on July 16, 2012
at 01:16 AM

Hey Spammy McSpamerson - get a life.

8c9ea35de2f7a0e7741bd8b2552aed74

on July 18, 2012
at 06:46 PM

Thanks for the conversion Tery James, I appreciate it. I am on a high cholesterol diet; it allows me to kick down doors, bang my wife everyday and I walk around with a smile on my face like the Buddha. I suggest you educate yourself on the matter right here: http://bit.ly/MsUCy5

11b7b7ba720a5cd43c74a0ef99a16adb

(3448)

on July 24, 2012
at 01:24 PM

"In the adult man the serum cholesterol level is essentially independent of the cholesterol intake over the whole range of human diets." - Ancel Keys, 1956

11b7b7ba720a5cd43c74a0ef99a16adb

(3448)

on July 24, 2012
at 01:24 PM

"There's no connection whatsoever between cholesterol in food and cholesterol in blood. And we've known that all along. Cholesterol in the diet doesn't matter at all unless you happen to be a chicken or a rabbit." Ancel Keys, 1997

11b7b7ba720a5cd43c74a0ef99a16adb

(3448)

on July 24, 2012
at 01:31 PM

The liver has the capacity to produce 100% of your cholesterol needs. If you limit your cholesterol intake, it makes more. If you increase your cholesterol intake, your liver makes less. Statins inhibit the liver's ability to make cholesterol. This is why taking statins is the ONLY method that works to reduce cholesterol levels. The only thing you accomplish by reducing your cholesterol intake is to make your liver ramp up its production of cholesterol. When looked at from that standpoint, it's actually healthier--for your liver--to eat more cholesterol as it puts less of a load on your liver.

9d741bcbe702044635f2ce3078043054

(1435)

on July 24, 2012
at 08:09 PM

Only a very small fraction of our bodily cholesterol comes from what we eat. What an inane comment. As someone else pointed out, mortality is higher when total cholesterol is below 200 than it is for the 220-250 range.

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