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Alzheimers Risk and Cholesterol: Red Herring?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 10, 2012 at 2:41 PM

From http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110912164005.htm:

People with high cholesterol levels, defined by a reading of more than 5.8 mmol/L, had significantly more brain plaques when compared to those with normal or lower cholesterol levels. A total of 86 percent of people with high cholesterol had brain plaques, compared with only 62 percent of people with low cholesterol levels.

The study found no link between high cholesterol and the tangles that develop in the brain with Alzheimer's disease.

In addition to high cholesterol increasing the risk of Alzheimer's disease, Sasaki previously found that insulin resistance, a sign of diabetes, may be another risk factor for brain plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease.

Never mind the correlation/causation thing, or that they say serum cholesterol impacts only plaques but then go back to the 'raises risk' thing - my question is whether that last bit is actually the key.

As we know that metabolic syndrome and elevated serum cholesterol are related, and that T2D and Alzheimers are related, is the serum cholesterol number a by-product of a process that actually hinges on insulin?

We've talked around this before; are we ready to call it?

E76821f1019f5284761bc4c33f2bf044

(383)

on May 13, 2012
at 06:44 PM

They indicate a link between plaques, AD and both hypercholesteremia and hyperinsulinemia. I came across this article because I have high SC but very low A1C; based on the literature, that's apparently not possible.

E7e7e1c856d4494d4a1b700b6869df90

(982)

on May 10, 2012
at 07:53 PM

that's what you call "scientific conclusion"

8496289baf18c2d3e210740614dc9082

(1867)

on May 10, 2012
at 03:54 PM

+1 For calling a red herring when you see it.

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3 Answers

4
11b7b7ba720a5cd43c74a0ef99a16adb

(3448)

on May 10, 2012
at 02:46 PM

"The study found no link between high cholesterol and the tangles that develop in the brain with Alzheimer's disease."

If they study found no link, then why are they talking as though there is a link.

It's my understanding that a host of cognitive disorders have been associated with having LOW cholesterol levels. Your brain (like your liver) actually makes cholesterol (because it can't pass through the blood/brain barrier). 25% of a person's cholesterol is found in the brain. Your synapses are largely made of cholesterol. Literally, you can not think without a certain level of cholesterol.

This is one reason statins are dangerous; they not only inhibit your liver from making cholesterol, they inhibit the brain from making cholesterol--cholesterol that is required for normal brain functioning.

Honestly, the more I read about cholesterol, the more I think "what the ** is really going on here?" You can go out onto PubMed and read research article after research article (just like this one) where in the data and body of the article they exonerate cholesterol, and then in the summary they recommend lowering cholesterol levels--a 100% disconnect between the data and the summary. ?????????????

E7e7e1c856d4494d4a1b700b6869df90

(982)

on May 10, 2012
at 07:53 PM

that's what you call "scientific conclusion"

E76821f1019f5284761bc4c33f2bf044

(383)

on May 13, 2012
at 06:44 PM

They indicate a link between plaques, AD and both hypercholesteremia and hyperinsulinemia. I came across this article because I have high SC but very low A1C; based on the literature, that's apparently not possible.

1
8496289baf18c2d3e210740614dc9082

on May 10, 2012
at 04:06 PM

High serum cholesterol is correlated with coronary artery disease as well, but we all know it's not the cause: it's an intermediary process. LDL is trying to do its job, and being prevented by things like hyperinflammatory state, low thyroid levels, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, etc. from effecting repair of damaged vessels.

Insulin resistance is implicated in AD, insulin-degrading enzyme is involved in beta amyloid trafficking (the plaques of AD), and intranasal insulin improves the symptoms of AD early in disease.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17942819 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12634421

High serum insulin increases the time LDL spends in the blood, right? So is it surprising that high serum cholesterol is found in a disease associated with hyperinsulinemia?

0
E7e7e1c856d4494d4a1b700b6869df90

(982)

on May 10, 2012
at 07:58 PM

Alzheinmers is beginning to be referred to as Type 3 diabetes. Seek out some podcasts by Dr. McCleary on brain function/disease and diet. He is a (retired) neurosurgeon.

does not take much to figure out who/what the usual suspect is ...and it is NOT fat.

McCleary Type 3 diabetes compliments of Jimmy Moore many more excellent podcasts...take it from there.

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