0

votes

cholesterol in a supplement form...?

Commented on August 14, 2014
Created August 13, 2014 at 6:00 AM

hi all,

is there such a thing as a cholesterol supplement ie. a supplement source of cholesterol?

of course it's best to get from foods. ie. egg yolks. but just wondered if such a supplement existed.

plus it could be useful for people who do not meet their minimum dietary cholesterol requirements (what ever that is? > bonus question) for one reason or another.

01f49b2c56fcbd16b030f36340f0487a

(-1)

on August 14, 2014
at 12:24 AM

...perhaps it could be good for something else, unrelated or not directly related to the cholesterol in our bodies

01f49b2c56fcbd16b030f36340f0487a

(-1)

on August 14, 2014
at 12:19 AM

thx @Matt 11. so, we do not need/require any dietary cholesterol.

but (as far as you know), does it have any benefits...can it be good for us to get some from our diets...?

01114547678b001f3e52cc3a9d343fd1

(-23)

on August 13, 2014
at 10:55 PM

I thought it was part of the culture, the idea to avoid sugar to keep cholesterol down. Anyway, I found this link quickly

Regarding fructose increasing thyroid function and therefore the conversion of cholesterol to other hormones, I've only heard Peat say it, don't know if it's true, but sugar increasing metabolism seems a pretty believable idea to me, just because it gives you energy. Sorry for the lack of rigor, in a sense I guess I'm just throwing ideas. I just feel great when my fructose intake is high and my blood cholesterol in the right ranges.

01f49b2c56fcbd16b030f36340f0487a

(-1)

on August 13, 2014
at 10:38 PM

for instance is sugar a 'precursor' to cholesterol...or is it more to do with sugar aiding with the conversion of cholesterol to hormones...(or may be it's both?)

01f49b2c56fcbd16b030f36340f0487a

(-1)

on August 13, 2014
at 10:37 PM

thx @Outsider, so i can delve deeper, do you have any refs/good links to further reading on the sugar/cholesterol relationship

01114547678b001f3e52cc3a9d343fd1

(-23)

on August 13, 2014
at 12:10 PM

I find hard to believe that consuming fruits or honey to taste would be detrimental to health, except in exceptional circumstances. These are clean, natural foods.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on August 13, 2014
at 12:04 PM

That would mostly increase triglycerides which isn't a good idea.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on August 13, 2014
at 11:05 AM

"In our anti-cholesterol culture, I doubt you'd find any"

been googling; turns out there is a supplement. but the jury seems to be out whether it actually does anything. it "may" help with the treatment of Smith–Lemli–Opitz syndrome (SLOS).

interesting topic tho, i will look in to it further when time allows.

further links: an article & the product itself here & here

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3 Answers

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on August 13, 2014
at 10:56 PM

Unless you have an inability to synthesize cholesterol, there would be no purpose in supplementing it.

Cholesterol bbiosynthesis starts with acetyl-CoA which comes from metabolism of both fats and carbohydrates. Simply being well feed insures you make adequate cholesterol.

01f49b2c56fcbd16b030f36340f0487a

(-1)

on August 14, 2014
at 12:19 AM

thx @Matt 11. so, we do not need/require any dietary cholesterol.

but (as far as you know), does it have any benefits...can it be good for us to get some from our diets...?

0
01114547678b001f3e52cc3a9d343fd1

on August 13, 2014
at 12:01 PM

If I wanted to increase cholesterol I would buy pure fructose and add it to milk or fruit juices. Fructose increases cholesterol more than glucose.

"plus it could be useful for people who do not meet their minimum dietary cholesterol requirements (what ever that is? > bonus question) for one reason or another."

The requirement of cholesterol is probably highly dependent on the rate of conversion of cholesterol to other hormones, which depends on thyroid function, and can vary wildly from person to person.

This will be controversial, but the best way to regulate cholesterol production I think is consuming sources of fructose to taste, since fructose strongly stimulates the production of cholesterol (it not only stimulates the production of cholesterol, but also its conversion to other hormones, which helps to keep the cholesterol level low despite having a high production). So the taste and desire for sweet things is probably up and down regulated to achieve optimal cholesterol production. Sources of fructose are fruits, honey, and table sugar.

01f49b2c56fcbd16b030f36340f0487a

(-1)

on August 13, 2014
at 10:37 PM

thx @Outsider, so i can delve deeper, do you have any refs/good links to further reading on the sugar/cholesterol relationship

01114547678b001f3e52cc3a9d343fd1

(-23)

on August 13, 2014
at 10:55 PM

I thought it was part of the culture, the idea to avoid sugar to keep cholesterol down. Anyway, I found this link quickly

Regarding fructose increasing thyroid function and therefore the conversion of cholesterol to other hormones, I've only heard Peat say it, don't know if it's true, but sugar increasing metabolism seems a pretty believable idea to me, just because it gives you energy. Sorry for the lack of rigor, in a sense I guess I'm just throwing ideas. I just feel great when my fructose intake is high and my blood cholesterol in the right ranges.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on August 13, 2014
at 12:04 PM

That would mostly increase triglycerides which isn't a good idea.

0
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on August 13, 2014
at 10:16 AM

Well, there is cholesterol in a form meant for hair use, but I don't think you'd want to eat it:

http://www.amazon.com/Queen-Helene-Super-Cholester...

In our anti-cholesterol culture, I doubt you'd find any. Your best bet would be lard or tallow. Even so, remember that we cannot make use of exogenous cholesterol except in very tiny amounts, like 200-500mg. So supplementing it wouldn't make any sense anyway.

Eating the substrates that help us make it (good quality heart healthy saturated fats) is the only way. Even then, the process is very tightly controlled by the liver. Eating an excess of fats wouldn't make more cholesterol unless you needed it. At best you could simply provide the fats and minerals needed for both cholesterol and bile production and that's it. The rest is up to your liver to decide, and it "knows best" how much is needed.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on August 13, 2014
at 11:05 AM

"In our anti-cholesterol culture, I doubt you'd find any"

been googling; turns out there is a supplement. but the jury seems to be out whether it actually does anything. it "may" help with the treatment of Smith–Lemli–Opitz syndrome (SLOS).

interesting topic tho, i will look in to it further when time allows.

further links: an article & the product itself here & here

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