3

votes

liquid chlorophyll

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 29, 2011 at 1:39 AM

My primary question is: How do you choke down your Liquid Clorophyll?

My veggie intake has definitely increased since playing with Paleo, my meat intake can't increase much...hubby already makes fun of my steak eating habits. There's still plenty of room in my diet for leafy greens though and I thought I'd cheat by taking liquid clorophyll.

So far I've tried it in smoothies and just in a shot glass. nasty and nastier. Blech!

If you use it, why and how? If you don't, why not (other than the general paleo argument against supplements).

Just to make sure we're clear, this is what I bought.

I have to laugh when that website suggests it as a mouthwash as it stained my teeth green when I drank it from the shot glass.

35b6ce9b7f9dda8d40d3e6a1812ab0a9

(439)

on July 06, 2011
at 05:22 PM

HA ChenZhen, I just watched Ironman 2 last night and thought the same thing. Until then didn't know what you were talking about!

7d0c3ea9bf8be00b93e6433d8f125ac3

(7540)

on June 29, 2011
at 06:12 PM

I'm just a lowly agroecology undergrad but...that doesn't make any sense. Chlorophyll is just a light-trapping pigment and there's no plausible mechanism by which it could increase red blood cell production in animals.

35b6ce9b7f9dda8d40d3e6a1812ab0a9

(439)

on June 29, 2011
at 01:33 PM

It helps your body make red blood cells is the main claim, which can be summarized as "fights anemia and gives you energy."

Medium avatar

(3029)

on June 29, 2011
at 07:13 AM

There’s a problem with your argument. Most serious research is funded by drug companies. They don't research things that they can't make money off of. Take baking soda for example. I read that it is more effective for kidney disease than standard kidney medications. Maybe this is true and maybe not. If I had kidney disease, I'd want to see some serious research. But who will perform it? Drug companies won’t because they can’t patent baking soda. So we’re left with anecdotal evidence and a lot of "may" "might" and "more research is needed".

1a641bbff1a7b0a70f08410376bbdf6b

(1587)

on June 29, 2011
at 06:09 AM

Nooo, I think it was Ironman 2, if it works for a superhero... ;D

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on June 29, 2011
at 05:58 AM

I think a lot of it comes from being on the fringe. After all, Paleo would be considered fringe by the majority of the population. Some are more critical (or cynical) in their thinking than others.

1bd4ea62097aa99c8cbef8aa5d02db77

(448)

on June 29, 2011
at 04:14 AM

I agree with wheelhouse - we eat greens for more than just the chlorophyll they contain. If you're looking for something you can drink have you tried making some spinach smoothies? They are delicious, and if you use baby spinach they are nice and mild and you'd hardly guess you're getting all those greens into your system.

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7 Answers

5
Fe535c4994ac6176f76e1ff6d29eb08a

on June 29, 2011
at 03:57 AM

My concern would be that you are getting the chlorophyll from the supplement, but nothing else. We eat greens for a host of reasons, the vitamins and minerals provided, the roughage to help things move through the system, and cause they taste good with some homemade vinaigrette. I don't think that the paleo community is against supplements in general, I know quite a few of us are taking C, D, B12, and fish oil. I think the key is making sure you are eating real food as much as possible. I think the while given that paleo is a diet of elimination, what you are left with, mostly meat and veg, need to be exploited as much as possible. So when youre even going to eliminate the veg, then you are just surviving on meat, and supplements.

I am sure others can talk more intelligently about nutrient absorbtion and such. I just know that one of the main things I focus on with this diet is jerf (just eat real food).

1bd4ea62097aa99c8cbef8aa5d02db77

(448)

on June 29, 2011
at 04:14 AM

I agree with wheelhouse - we eat greens for more than just the chlorophyll they contain. If you're looking for something you can drink have you tried making some spinach smoothies? They are delicious, and if you use baby spinach they are nice and mild and you'd hardly guess you're getting all those greens into your system.

2
0242b468fe1c97997749db416c92e7ed

(4528)

on June 29, 2011
at 02:30 PM

I use it a few times a week because chlorophyll is an awesome internal deodorant. The type I buy comes in a tincture bottle with an eye dropper. To take it, I tilt my head back and use the eye dropper to deposit the chlorophyll at the back of my throat, swallowing immediately. Chase with a glass of water. Quick and painless, and my teeth and gums aren't turned bright green. ;)

2
425aa4bfb79556ed50ea693c3edd7e13

(609)

on June 29, 2011
at 05:30 AM

Seriously? Where do you guys get these ideas?

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on June 29, 2011
at 05:58 AM

I think a lot of it comes from being on the fringe. After all, Paleo would be considered fringe by the majority of the population. Some are more critical (or cynical) in their thinking than others.

1a641bbff1a7b0a70f08410376bbdf6b

(1587)

on June 29, 2011
at 06:09 AM

Nooo, I think it was Ironman 2, if it works for a superhero... ;D

35b6ce9b7f9dda8d40d3e6a1812ab0a9

(439)

on July 06, 2011
at 05:22 PM

HA ChenZhen, I just watched Ironman 2 last night and thought the same thing. Until then didn't know what you were talking about!

1
5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on June 29, 2011
at 04:21 AM

I don't drink chlorophyll. In a quick Google search, I don't see any research that proves any benefits. Sure is a whole lot of "May", "Might", "More Research/Study is needed" out there though. Which tells me it's great at putting a lot of money in someone's pocket, but not necessarily providing any benefit. Does that mean it's bad for you? No. But I'm not so rich that I can dump a lot of money for crappy tasting stuff that won't necessarily do me any good. Your mileage may vary.

Medium avatar

(3029)

on June 29, 2011
at 07:13 AM

There’s a problem with your argument. Most serious research is funded by drug companies. They don't research things that they can't make money off of. Take baking soda for example. I read that it is more effective for kidney disease than standard kidney medications. Maybe this is true and maybe not. If I had kidney disease, I'd want to see some serious research. But who will perform it? Drug companies won’t because they can’t patent baking soda. So we’re left with anecdotal evidence and a lot of "may" "might" and "more research is needed".

1
215d3126214343a5760316f195a06b97

on June 29, 2011
at 03:30 AM

I put it in my water and drink it.. the kind I get is naturally flavored with mint :D Though I heard recently that this is a supplement that one can do with out... haven't bothered to do the research though.. I like it lol

0
25329057c9d5f6364a74787c8c2302e7

on June 29, 2011
at 03:36 PM

Try taking some spinach or lettuce and blending it up into a paste. Add water, drink. All the benefit of eating the greens, a lot less time.

There is also a huge problem with nutrition isolation. Sure, certain benefits occur when you eat greens, and greens have chlorophyll. But there are so many other things in greens, many of which we don't fully understand.

It is like working out one muscle instead of doing some natural movement like kids on a playground. You might get a big workout for one muscle, but all the little stabilizer muscles that you aren't using are very important, and better served via a a variety of natural movements.

We aren't at the point where we fully understand why what we eat is good or bad completely. So nearly all cheats (supplements, etc) have a significant downside, because we are missing something relevant.

0
7d0c3ea9bf8be00b93e6433d8f125ac3

(7540)

on June 29, 2011
at 07:24 AM

Why on earth would humans (or anything else that isn't a photosynthetic organism) need chlorophyll? Am I missing something here?

35b6ce9b7f9dda8d40d3e6a1812ab0a9

(439)

on June 29, 2011
at 01:33 PM

It helps your body make red blood cells is the main claim, which can be summarized as "fights anemia and gives you energy."

7d0c3ea9bf8be00b93e6433d8f125ac3

(7540)

on June 29, 2011
at 06:12 PM

I'm just a lowly agroecology undergrad but...that doesn't make any sense. Chlorophyll is just a light-trapping pigment and there's no plausible mechanism by which it could increase red blood cell production in animals.

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