4

votes

What sweetener is least evil for children?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created May 18, 2011 at 1:59 AM

There are situations for every parent where a little sugar goes a long ways. Such as coaxing down medicines with a young child. We've been using Agave and are thinking about Stevia. I understand Stevia has been used in Japan for awhile, and has no insulin reaction. On the other hand, agave seems more 'real' and perhaps less processed. I'd obviously be reluctant to give the kids (all 2 or under) anything newfangled (Equal, Splenda, etc). Oh, and before we go there, of course we're minimizing sweets. Question is what's least evil when we do need it.

Thanks for any ideas!

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on March 03, 2012
at 07:19 AM

+3 upvotes for everyone. Great advice.

13db020c06c22c2f8b129034ddc013e4

(340)

on May 20, 2011
at 11:36 PM

Nice summary. Thanks!

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on May 18, 2011
at 02:07 PM

I was going to say the same thing. Trying to keep kids completely off of sweets is impossible unless you lock them in a bubble. They also have very high metabolisms and as long as they're eating good diets, can handle the sugar. Our rule is that the kid has to have a square meal before any sweets, but that treats are ok. I also try to choose sweets that are matched with fat (i.e. ice cream), because the fat slows down the sugar spike, they can't eat too much of it, and carries some nutrition.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 18, 2011
at 01:32 PM

i think your sentiment is spot-on. if you're raising healthy kids who eat good whole foods 90% of the time, some type of sugar is not going to adversely affect them AT ALL. my 3 year old neice is a perfect example. Her parents feed her very well (not paleo, but nothing processed and all homemade, etc). She eats sugar when its in certain things: birthday cakes, blah blah. She is fine. I did the same growing up, I'm fine. Its about the core of the eating - if you eat almost all the time you will be healthy. Done. Bits of sugar here and there can't make a dent.

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on May 18, 2011
at 01:01 PM

we do the same! james, no honey (especially raw) for babies under the age of one but after that its ok. raw honey contains botulism spores that can make a tiny one sick but dont pose a problem for someone with a mature immune. maple syrup is great! and mashed bananas are about as sweet as honey. love that idea.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on May 18, 2011
at 12:48 PM

That sacredchocolate.com is a crime against good website design :) Pink hearts as bulletpoints?

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on May 18, 2011
at 04:02 AM

Out of curiousity, I know honey's not for the babies. What about maple syrup?

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on May 18, 2011
at 03:06 AM

Interesting - if you have a link I'd be curious to read more.

B4ec9ce369e43ea83f06ee645169cee0

on May 18, 2011
at 02:52 AM

I love the idea of palm (coconut) sugar but I recently learned that it's not a sustainable product. Just (literally) food for thought. I haven't done a ton of research yet on verifying the claim but thought I should throw it out there.

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20888)

on May 18, 2011
at 02:46 AM

Forgot to add...Grade B maple syrup (the tasty dark stuff) is mostly glucose. The lighter (and sweeter) the maple syrup gets the more fructose.

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on May 18, 2011
at 02:42 AM

I'd say judging by any packed 21st century American birthday party that sweeteners could result in evil [-behaving] children. ;-p

637042e24e38a81dfc089ef55bed9d46

(826)

on May 18, 2011
at 02:33 AM

I'm so tired I thought your question was, "What sweetener is best for evil children?"

0dc1d63c3d5975f5115f535c6a90c9dd

(2283)

on May 18, 2011
at 02:31 AM

I agree sugar isn't exactly health food, but treating any food as "off limits" for kids can actually set them up for emotional eating issues later on. You're better off allowing some,in moderation. IMO, anyways. We do honey, maple syrup, or brown rice syrup in our house.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on May 18, 2011
at 02:23 AM

Yep! Honey for our house too.

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11 Answers

best answer

8
D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on May 18, 2011
at 02:41 AM

Occasionally my daughters (4, 17 months) will have something that has a few drops of liquid whole leaf stevia throughout. I have no problem with a liquid whole stevia concentrate since it's made by boiling stevia leaves and reducing until highly concentrated. That said, I try to keep my girls' exposure to stevia rare and instead usually favor limited honey or palm sugar for the occasional touch of sweetness.

As for agave, even if it is classified as natural (which I'd debate), its fructose content is so high that if you are definitely going to sweeten there are a myriad of other options (raw honey, palm/coconut sugar, high quality 100% maple syrup) which are superior.

See these threads for more to think about with sweeteners (artificial and natural):

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/artificial-sweeteners/

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/the-definitive-guide-to-sugar/

Mark says in the second link: "Raw honey and coconut sugar likewise offer solid nutritional benefit for their sugar content compared to other sweeteners."

B4ec9ce369e43ea83f06ee645169cee0

on May 18, 2011
at 02:52 AM

I love the idea of palm (coconut) sugar but I recently learned that it's not a sustainable product. Just (literally) food for thought. I haven't done a ton of research yet on verifying the claim but thought I should throw it out there.

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on May 18, 2011
at 03:06 AM

Interesting - if you have a link I'd be curious to read more.

10
0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on May 18, 2011
at 12:45 PM

I will probably go against the trend here but here goes. Sugar is not evil.

I would say a good choice to give your kids if you need something sweet is just normal table sugar.

It is cheap and easily avaliable. In small amounts it is not evil, though certainly not good for you in large amounts. A teaspoon of table sugar is 4 grams containing 2 grams of fructose. If this scares you then you certainly need to start thinking about orthorexia :) There is a long term theme among health and natural food people that to be healthy something needs to be expensive or exotic, mostly to the benefit to those selling these products. Agave syrup is just a processed as any other sweetner, it is all fructose and is mostly a natural health food scam. You don't have to buy expensive, exotic products from a distant lands to be healthy.

Honey, maple syrup, molasses, coconut sugar etc are all fine, I do like some honey personally, however they are not magically different to sugar. Artificial sweeteners are just that, chemical substitutes trying to recreate the taste of sugar and they do not usually taste as good.

Just relax, give your children a good diet, and don't stress about occasionally just giving them some plain old sugar. Having a relaxed relationship with food is important for children to learn.

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on May 18, 2011
at 02:07 PM

I was going to say the same thing. Trying to keep kids completely off of sweets is impossible unless you lock them in a bubble. They also have very high metabolisms and as long as they're eating good diets, can handle the sugar. Our rule is that the kid has to have a square meal before any sweets, but that treats are ok. I also try to choose sweets that are matched with fat (i.e. ice cream), because the fat slows down the sugar spike, they can't eat too much of it, and carries some nutrition.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 18, 2011
at 01:32 PM

i think your sentiment is spot-on. if you're raising healthy kids who eat good whole foods 90% of the time, some type of sugar is not going to adversely affect them AT ALL. my 3 year old neice is a perfect example. Her parents feed her very well (not paleo, but nothing processed and all homemade, etc). She eats sugar when its in certain things: birthday cakes, blah blah. She is fine. I did the same growing up, I'm fine. Its about the core of the eating - if you eat almost all the time you will be healthy. Done. Bits of sugar here and there can't make a dent.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on March 03, 2012
at 07:19 AM

+3 upvotes for everyone. Great advice.

6
35e09dae32de43af73b3bffaff5636fe

(103)

on May 18, 2011
at 11:47 AM

a alternative sweetener overview.

http://www.sacredchocolate.com/agave-blues-david-wolfe/

After dealing with the agave blues, you may want to select another sweetener. Here are some options (in alphabetical order):

>

  • Coconut Palm Sugar: This is now available as a sweetener. It is usually heat processed, yet unconfirmed reports indicate raw coconut palm sugar is now available from Balinese sources. It is processed using lime (chalk) or mangosteen sap to neutralize acidity. Because of the calcification problems associated with eating chalk and the magic associated with the mangosteen tree, mangosteen sap processed coconut palm sugar is preferred.

>

  • Erythritol: Erythritol is made by breaking down plant starch into glucose. Then the yeast Moniliella pollinis is added to the glucose. Through fermentation, the glucose breaks down into erythritol. Metabolic, toxicological, and clinical studies covering areas as diverse as cancer, nervous system health, and allergic reactions have found erythritol to be safe. Erythritol has GRAS (generally recognized as safe) status in the United States. Seek out organic erythritol or products containing it.

>

  • Honey (raw, organic): Honey is always the natural sweetener of choice. Look for wild honey because it is lower in free fructose and higher in trace mineral content. Also, look for richer dark honeys (e.g. NoniLand honey, etc.) Inulin: A long-chain polysaccharide that is mostly too long a sugar to absorb into the blood stream. Inulin may be isolated from Jerusalem artichoke or properly processed agave. Look for inulin powder or Jerusalem artichoke syrup. Too much inulin intake can cause digestive distress in certain people.

>

  • Lo Han Guo: A non-glycemic sweetener from Chinese medicinal tradition made from a type of wild cucumber.

>

  • Lucuma: Lucuma???s sugar content is low. The percentage amount present in the dried pulp from mature lucuma fruit is: 8.4% glucose, 4.7% fructose, 1.7% sucrose, and 0.06% inositol (http://www.buywholefoodsonline.co.uk/lucuma-powder).

>

  • Maple syrup: this is the only sustainably-harvested, large-scale, forest sweetener in the world. Maple is likely the richest source of minerals found in any sweetener other than dark honeys and molasses. Look for organic maple syrup and maple crystals as an ingredient.

>

  • Molasses: Select unsulfured, organic sugarcane molasses because it is fairly rich in vitamins and minerals and has been purported (like fresh sugar cane) to have ???anti-stiffness factors??? that break down detrimental calcification (see my book The LongevityNOW Program).

>

  • Soak water: This is a natural sweetener from dried fruits such as date water, goji water, or dried fig water. Shop for organic dried fruit products and soak them in spring water for several hours to make your own fresh soak water.

    Stevia: I recommend dried powdered leaves over extracts. This is a wonderful and easy plant to grow. It contains no real sugar, so therefore it does not feed candida or cancer. Look for organic stevia products.

  • Xylitol: This could be the sweetener of the future if it could be obtained with certified organic quality. Xylitol does not feed candida or cancer, but tastes normally sweet. Originally isolated from birch syrup; it is now available as a white powder.

>

  • Yacon: An extraordinarily easy to obtain and abundant subtropical to tropical tuber, relative to the Jerusalem artichoke. Yacon is commonly available as dehydrated chips and as a syrup. Look for organic products. Yacon syrup is rich in iron and only mildly glycemic.

Other sweeteners to avoid, besides common agave:

>

  • Refined white and brown sugars made from beet, sorghum, or sugarcane of all sorts, primarily due to genetically modified crop contamination.

>

  • Evaporated Cane Juice: Rapadura is one of the many names of this highly processed and highly heated product. This is almost pure sucrose, like maple, but lacks in minerals. Evaporated cane juice is known to aggravate all sugar-sensitive conditions from diabetes to candida to cancer. Evaporated cane juice can be certified organic. This product often sneaks into chocolate products, pre-made smoothies, and lots of vegan treats (because it is not processed with bone char).

>

  • Sorbitol: This sweetener is typically made from genetically modified corn starch. It was originally isolated from stone fruits of the genus Sorbus.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on May 18, 2011
at 12:48 PM

That sacredchocolate.com is a crime against good website design :) Pink hearts as bulletpoints?

13db020c06c22c2f8b129034ddc013e4

(340)

on May 20, 2011
at 11:36 PM

Nice summary. Thanks!

4
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20888)

on May 18, 2011
at 02:27 AM

If you believe Lustig (which I do!) then you'll treat fructose like the devil. Agave nectar is somewhere between 70 and 90% fructose. So I never use it. Your body doesn't care if sugar is "natural" or "real". It treats it all the same.

0dc1d63c3d5975f5115f535c6a90c9dd

(2283)

on May 18, 2011
at 02:31 AM

I agree sugar isn't exactly health food, but treating any food as "off limits" for kids can actually set them up for emotional eating issues later on. You're better off allowing some,in moderation. IMO, anyways. We do honey, maple syrup, or brown rice syrup in our house.

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20888)

on May 18, 2011
at 02:46 AM

Forgot to add...Grade B maple syrup (the tasty dark stuff) is mostly glucose. The lighter (and sweeter) the maple syrup gets the more fructose.

3
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 18, 2011
at 04:01 AM

Seems like there may be benefits to sweeteners like honey (has nutrients, helps allergies, antibacterial) and maple syrup (similar but doesn't help with allergies) There are probably others that are as good or better in terms of lower fructose however.

I grow stevia herb in my garden and although it might be just a curiosity to grow it and try to use the leaves. They are mighty sweet just chewing on them and will infuse a slight sweetness to liquids. I don't have kids but my friends 2 y/o likes the things I make her for dessert. I find that sweet potatoes particularly the Japanese ones will make yogurt into a sweet smoothie or a frozen treat if you blend them with low sugar fruits like frozen berries.

I read on Weston Price website that agave is very processed so be careful with that stuff most of it may not be very natural.

3
Medium avatar

(12379)

on May 18, 2011
at 02:17 AM

We use honey or maple syrup at our house. Organic for the maple syrup and raw organic honey. Our little guy likes banana's a lot so we mash some banana and add cinnamon or vanilla too sometimes.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on May 18, 2011
at 02:23 AM

Yep! Honey for our house too.

Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on May 18, 2011
at 01:01 PM

we do the same! james, no honey (especially raw) for babies under the age of one but after that its ok. raw honey contains botulism spores that can make a tiny one sick but dont pose a problem for someone with a mature immune. maple syrup is great! and mashed bananas are about as sweet as honey. love that idea.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on May 18, 2011
at 04:02 AM

Out of curiousity, I know honey's not for the babies. What about maple syrup?

2
8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

on May 18, 2011
at 11:32 PM

I would second Matthew's answer and add that do not use sweeteners as a reward mechanism. Incorporate small amounts of sugar, brown sugar, maple syrup, honey, etc in meal planning. Society too frequently "rewards" children and adults with carbohydrates for everything - cake, cupcakes, ice cream, etc. The saying, "Eat your vegetables - or NO dessert." Never eat sweeteners when upset, depressed, or angry. This is bad programming that movies, ads, and the media promote.

I eat 70-85% dark chocolate 20-30 grams about 2-3 times a week and homemade heavy whipped cream (where you control how much sweetener you use) with berries and almonds as part of breakfast (which includes animal protein/fat) 2-3 times a week.

If the day is not going well then watch something funny, talk to a friend, play some cheerful music, get some physical activity, etc. but food, especially carbs should not be used to compensate for mood! Increase omega 3 ratio.

I support small amounts of honey, sugar, brown sugar, maple syrup, molasses - those that are truly paleo but I think the other sweeteners are sketchier. I do believe in the 30 day plan to wean off all sweeteners for everyone. After doing strict paleo for a month, I could taste the sweetness in vegetables like lettuce, tomatoes, broccoli, etc! Now I can't stand the taste of very sweet stuff. I have tried a sip of juice, soda, Vita Coco and spit it out because it was too sweet! So I no longer drink those things.

My biochem professor in my doctorate program said that sugar receptors on the tongue become more sensitive when you wean off sugar and I believe that! I think he would have supported Paleo/Primal (who knows maybe he was one himself)- he had frequent tirades and rants against sugar, high fructose corn syrup, and corn. He supported low-carb for everyone. He taught us the biochemistry of diabetes.

I gave up artificial sweeteners 3 years ago because the aftertaste bothered me (even stevia does), and because some cancer and weight loss research was against it. I also never lost weight with it - probably gained some in the past.

1
6371f0ae0c075ded1b8cd30aafd4bf16

on September 07, 2013
at 12:44 AM

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honey

Honey is fructose and glucose so a healthier option would be dextrose which is just glucose. Not to say its the best tasting option.

1
60199d3a580a4e17969059609e48e678

on May 18, 2011
at 02:23 AM

I use local honey from a local apiary, it comes in all different flavors too so its very versatile.

0
01136448a590c3e37784db15bd3a9aff

on March 03, 2012
at 07:06 AM

Statement in reference to stevia : "I also never lost weight with it - probably gained some in the past" - is truly naive. The person in question doesn't lose weight because of many bad eating/diet habits which incorporates fructose like sugars, casein and gluten. Gluten makes digestion sluggish and thus subscribes to fermentation of food. The fermented food feeds candidas; the body toxic on candidas cannot lose weight (due to toxicity the adipose fat doesn't burn)

0
13db020c06c22c2f8b129034ddc013e4

on May 19, 2011
at 12:28 PM

Thanks all for the suggestions. We'll try switching over to honey and second (depending on the dish) molasses.

In the meantime I did find a nice source for glycemic load on sweeteners (hence the auto-answer):

http://www.organiclifestylemagazine.com/blog/healthy-sugar-alternatives.php

While type and ratio of sugar obviously matters, on pure GL it looks like honey beats molasses. Xylitrol seems really nice (as does Stevia), but I can't find Xylitrol locally.

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