8

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Should I eat the skin on my whole roasted chicken or chicken legs?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 23, 2011 at 4:51 AM

Should I eat the skin on my whole roasted chicken or chicken legs?

If they're pastured*, yes?

If they're CAFO, no?

Or always no?

I'm especially concerned about omega 6.

*I understand that it's rare to find fully pastured chickens.

E7adfe31507efb7c935f618a829f56d6

(1507)

on April 23, 2012
at 10:41 PM

ha!! "ohsixey."

C79a5b43dfc5749200bd9dcaa6bb0858

on February 02, 2012
at 09:29 PM

I beg to disagree. Chicken can (shocking!) be delicious. Just saying. http://www.theclothesmakethegirl.com/2009/06/09/the-best-chicken-you-will-ever-eat-ever/

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on February 24, 2011
at 01:36 AM

Thanks for asking. I love baked dark chicken meat with skin on...wish that somehow it weren't so ohsixey, otherwise it would be on my menu even more often!

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on February 23, 2011
at 07:49 PM

probably why tropical traditions boasts about never feeding their chickens soy. i bet if someone did a test theirs would come out with a much better ratio. http://www.tropicaltraditions.com/pastured_poultry.htm

D67e7b481854b02110d5a5b21d6789b1

(4101)

on February 23, 2011
at 05:34 PM

great question, I have been wondering this myself. And I have completely quit eating factory farmed chicken for almost a year now. Interestingly, after I eliminated the factory chicken, I did not have a period for the next month and I am always regular. It took 59 days and four hormone pills from the doc to get it started again (and I was not underweight or stressed).

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6 Answers

best answer

3
7e1064164e012a1ead098098245b1cd4

(1197)

on February 23, 2011
at 05:42 AM

I don't think that eating the skin from any kind of chicken occasionally would be particularly detrimental. You could take the route of eating the chicken and then perhaps taking a spoon or two of cod-liver oil to balance things out slightly? It depends really...certainly there are better things you could be eating (yummy ruminants!) but every now and then it shouldn't cause you any problems to eat something like this.

Striving for optimal all the time is good but realistically speaking probably not that easy! Don't sweat the small stuff so much and enjoy your yummy chicken skin ;-).

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5
Medium avatar

on February 23, 2011
at 05:43 AM

Chicken tastes pretty bad without the skin; if you're going to eat it, you may as well make it enjoyable. If you're eating pastured ruminant flesh the rest of the week, it's not really a big deal.

C79a5b43dfc5749200bd9dcaa6bb0858

on February 02, 2012
at 09:29 PM

I beg to disagree. Chicken can (shocking!) be delicious. Just saying. http://www.theclothesmakethegirl.com/2009/06/09/the-best-chicken-you-will-ever-eat-ever/

4
E0b0d94cebef8ed2371d02ec2ecb5461

(94)

on February 23, 2011
at 05:14 AM

as i understand it, if you are especially concerned with omega 6 you would be well advised to steer clear of chicken entirely.

2
Efc949694a31043bfce9ec86e8235cd7

on February 23, 2011
at 04:00 PM

I'm pretty sure Grok ate birds. And I bet he didn't toss the tastiest part (skin) back into the fire pit! :)

It's all about balance, right? We've all known people out there who will ONLY eat boneless, skinless chicken breast. Yuck! Might as well be eating cardboard! Those people are WAY out of balance and would consume a lion's share of n6 PUFA in their steady-chicken diet.

I agree with the posters who say "don't sweat it" if you take care to add n3 and mix up your proteins with ruminants, etc.

1
Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on February 23, 2011
at 03:42 PM

meh... it's chicken. eat it. but just make sure that you're getting sufficient omega3 in your diet. personally, i don't supplement (well.. unless you count FCLO as an omega3 supp).

i just make sure i get natural sources throughout the week, perticularly wild caught canned sardines/salmon, pasture butter, pastured eggs, grass fed ghee.

chris kresser posted an article a few weeks ago discussing the o6 content of chicken, and it started a flurry of comments. good points were made from both sides, but at this point, all paleo folk 'in the know' understand that a diet heavily unbalanced with too much o6 causes a myriad of health problems. if you stay away from vegetable oils and eat lots of pastured foods and some wild fish, i think you're fine to eat some chicken and nuts. i will continue to do just that.

edit: oh sorry but i forgot to add that Tropical Traditions has fully pastured chickens, but good lord it is expensive! i seriously do not know how people can afford to order that, but anyway, if you can, they have it.

0
8f08fb03fc5c2f44b7d5357e8a3ab1c5

on February 23, 2011
at 05:58 PM

I have looked into this, and if you are concerned about omega 6/3 balance, the answer is a resounding NO. To my knowledge, "pastured" only means that they are let outside but are still fed by the growers with unspecified chicken feed (which most likely means they are fed corn and soy, which will result in skyrocketing omega 6 values in the chicken fat, not to mention phytoestrogen accumulation from the soy feed). I would only eat lean chicken breast, and you can see the omega 6 values below:

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/poultry-products/703/2

Of course, you could always have cheat days when you treat yourself to some crispy chicken skin.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on February 23, 2011
at 07:49 PM

probably why tropical traditions boasts about never feeding their chickens soy. i bet if someone did a test theirs would come out with a much better ratio. http://www.tropicaltraditions.com/pastured_poultry.htm

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