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Nausea, usually after eating ruminant fat?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 13, 2012 at 10:41 AM

I have lately found that eating large amounts of ruminant fat, such as lamb or beef, gives me nausea. By large amounts, I mean fatty cuts such as lamb cuts or beef oxtail. It's curious, as this doesn't happen when I eat a greater amount of chicken, all cuts including skin. I would have thought it would have been the opposite considering omega 3:6 and PUFA. The lamb that I eat is grassfed but the beef varies because of availability. I have tried chicken that is conventional and free range, as I don't have access to pastured, with little variance. I have been eating less fat from ruminants as a result, but I was wondering if any of the great minds of Paleohacks had any comments or insight? Thank you.

F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on October 13, 2012
at 03:50 PM

nice to see you again on here, nance! feel like it's been a while.

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3 Answers

2
1b47e0a6d7984e33e59581d8364cc3dd

(716)

on October 13, 2012
at 11:25 AM

Fat slows down digestion, and digestion draws a lot of blood and energy around the digestive system, so there's somewhat less for the brain which may make you nauseous. It takes time for your body to adapt to this if you haven't been eating as much fat in your diet, so the best way is to be patient and go slowly, starting with smaller amounts of fat and increasing it as you feel comfortable. I used to feel nauseous too, but now after 1-2 years I'm eating huge amounts of fat in one meal with no problems.

1
B1076248dde479773e75044818e1878c

(458)

on October 13, 2012
at 06:01 PM

Here are two perspectives. 1) My boyfriend (who is healthy) first experienced nausea when converting to paleo. After eating a few fatty cuts of steak I brought over, he thought he was going to have to tell me to stop bringing it. But as he cut back on the grains, sugar, and then fruit juice, he found he was feeling better than ever, and he now eats more fat off the meat than I do (in fact, that's his favorite part).

2) I have an autoimmune disorder (spondylitis) and struggle with gastroparesis/gastritis. I sometimes find that eating too much fat is a bit hard on my digestion. I simply cut it back to where my stomach is happy but make sure I eat enough so I'm getting the benefit.

As my dirt-poor farmer father told me as a little kid, "What?! You're going to throw that fat away? That's the best part! We fought for that part! That's what makes your hair and nails grow well!" Wise Dad.

1
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on October 13, 2012
at 03:37 PM

If I may use dogs as an analogy, dog owners know you don't switch brands of dog food all at once. You mix in a little bit of the new food and gradually increase the ratio until the new brand dominates. Why? To avoid nausea and diarrhea.

We're not that different. If you haven't been eating much of a particular meat or probiotic or vegetable, etc., it makes sense to start with a little bit and increase gradually. It has a lot to do with your gut bacteria, I think, and your gut community probably reflects what you have been eating regularly.

We tend to think the problem's with the food, but some times it is and sometimes it isn't. In my case, I can stuff myself with fatty beef and all that happens is that I have l ots of energy and little appetite for a day or so. Supermarket chicken makes me sick but Cornish hens and good quality chicken don't. Dairy gives me trouble if I'm not using probiotics like water kefir that support my gut community.

F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on October 13, 2012
at 03:50 PM

nice to see you again on here, nance! feel like it's been a while.

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