1

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Hack my chicken!

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 21, 2011 at 1:32 PM

Usually, when I eat chicken, it might as well have been a Xanax or Ambien. I mean it's all I can do to not pass out. This is not a problem with beef or pork (that I've noticed). Does anybody else have this issue? I know turkey has L-tryptophan, but I do not think this is the case with chicken. Is this weird?

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on July 27, 2011
at 01:25 AM

A half of a beer definitely would not affect me nor give me a headache. Even bad beer :-).

B14dc4aa1ddefbec3bc09550428ee493

(3909)

on July 22, 2011
at 04:12 AM

Are you sure it wasn't the alcohol that you had on an empty stomach? That seems like a more likely culprit to me.

E5103bd115084c001999682686069a20

(286)

on July 21, 2011
at 10:32 PM

Yeah I think it's pretty impossible to find non grain fed chickens so I try to keep it to a minimum because I have a corn allergy. Although I ve never reacted to chicken (only eggs) I am cautious with it.

6670b38baf0aae7f4d8ac2463ddc37c0

(3946)

on July 21, 2011
at 05:14 PM

http://nutritiondata.self.com/foods-000079000000000000000-4.html

6670b38baf0aae7f4d8ac2463ddc37c0

(3946)

on July 21, 2011
at 05:12 PM

Even my pastured chicken is supplemented with grain.

E34fbfa1bca9ae970c9c7313bf9de9f8

(1436)

on July 21, 2011
at 04:42 PM

Most chicken is grain fed, even pastured chicken.

E3c6d84c01a12e2ee1c49e2180d84238

(315)

on July 21, 2011
at 03:56 PM

I get my chicken at our local farmer's market, but suppose it is grain fed. I do find grass fed beef, but it never occurred to me that chickens ate anything but grain.

E3c6d84c01a12e2ee1c49e2180d84238

(315)

on July 21, 2011
at 03:54 PM

Bananas knock me out too. I'd always thought it was the sugar, but I suppose it could be a double whammy.

E3c6d84c01a12e2ee1c49e2180d84238

(315)

on July 21, 2011
at 01:54 PM

It's good to know I'm not alone. Thanks.

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7 Answers

3
07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on July 21, 2011
at 06:57 PM

Turkey isn't especially high in tryptophan, either - if I recall correctly, all animal meat has a lot. The post-thanksgiving 'turkey crash' is more an aspect of stuffing yourself silly than any tryptophan effect.

One belief is that heavy consumption of turkey meat (as for example in a Thanksgiving or Christmas feast) results in drowsiness, which has been attributed to high levels of tryptophan contained in turkey.[54][55][56] However, while turkey does contain high levels of tryptophan, the amount is comparable to that contained in most other meats.[18] Furthermore, post-meal drowsiness on Thanksgiving may have more to do with what else is consumed along with the turkey and, in particular, carbohydrates.[57] It has been demonstrated in both animal models[58] and in humans[59][60][61] that ingestion of a meal rich in carbohydrates triggers release of insulin. Insulin in turn stimulates the uptake of large neutral branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), but not tryptophan (an aromatic amino acid) into muscle, increasing the ratio of tryptophan to BCAA in the blood stream.

-- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tryptophan#Turkey_meat_and_drowsiness

3
B76f22ed4373946b3c8990b667562683

on July 21, 2011
at 02:17 PM

Chicken has nearly as much tryptophan in it as turkey does. This is likely the issue, especially if you've noticed this feeling before when eating turkey.

2
F074daf8ee19a4c101c533b7fdab708a

(284)

on July 21, 2011
at 03:20 PM

There are actually lots of foods with tryptophan! It is particularly plentiful in chocolate, oats, bananas, durians, mangoes, dried dates, milk, yogurt, cottage cheese, red meat, eggs, fish, poultry, sesame, chickpeas, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, spirulina, and peanuts. It is also found in turkey at a level typical of poultry in general. Tryptophan occurs naturally in nearly all foods that contain protein, but in small amounts compared to the other essential amino acids. The following foods contain tryptophan in significant quantities: red meat, dairy products, nuts, seeds, bananas, soybeans and soy products, tuna, shellfish, and turkey.

E3c6d84c01a12e2ee1c49e2180d84238

(315)

on July 21, 2011
at 03:54 PM

Bananas knock me out too. I'd always thought it was the sugar, but I suppose it could be a double whammy.

1
E5103bd115084c001999682686069a20

on July 21, 2011
at 02:16 PM

Are you eating grain fed chicken? In my experience it's very hard to find chicken that are NOT grain fed (I live in Chicago). It's possible if you're very sensitive to grain that you are reacting to that and not the chicken. I've noticed this effect on me with wheat and soy in particular.

E34fbfa1bca9ae970c9c7313bf9de9f8

(1436)

on July 21, 2011
at 04:42 PM

Most chicken is grain fed, even pastured chicken.

E5103bd115084c001999682686069a20

(286)

on July 21, 2011
at 10:32 PM

Yeah I think it's pretty impossible to find non grain fed chickens so I try to keep it to a minimum because I have a corn allergy. Although I ve never reacted to chicken (only eggs) I am cautious with it.

6670b38baf0aae7f4d8ac2463ddc37c0

(3946)

on July 21, 2011
at 05:12 PM

Even my pastured chicken is supplemented with grain.

E3c6d84c01a12e2ee1c49e2180d84238

(315)

on July 21, 2011
at 03:56 PM

I get my chicken at our local farmer's market, but suppose it is grain fed. I do find grass fed beef, but it never occurred to me that chickens ate anything but grain.

1
Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

on July 21, 2011
at 01:40 PM

I do get a weird temporary lethargic feeling after eating a chicken. I don't get that with other meats. I can't offer an explanation.

E3c6d84c01a12e2ee1c49e2180d84238

(315)

on July 21, 2011
at 01:54 PM

It's good to know I'm not alone. Thanks.

0
E3c6d84c01a12e2ee1c49e2180d84238

on July 23, 2011
at 01:27 PM

Whatever the cause, I'd just like to report that, after three chicken and egg-free days, I am surprised and delighted to find that my depression seems to have lifted and I have about 50% more energy - and, of course, no more passing out after meals. I'm hoping the trend continues. Thanks for all the responses.

0
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on July 21, 2011
at 06:37 PM

This is starting to happen to me. I made "beer butt chicken" the other night (drink half of a beer, put garlic, lemon, pepper, and herbs in the can, then set a chicken upright on the can, cover it in butter, salt, pepper and lemon juice, and grill/roast it for an hour), one of our favorite chicken preps.

I ate a bunch of it because I hadn't eaten all day (4-5 pieces), and the next day had a pretty wicked hangover. While I was eating it I had a bit of that oogie feeling like I'm eating McDonald's or something, but I was hungry... the chickens were "Nature's Promise" organic chickens, but these days I suspect the difference between "organic" chickens and "Frank Purdue chickens raised in a feed lot fed chicken manure" is unfortunately pretty small.

I was recently re-reading some Archevore stuff about omega-6 and omega-3 fats, and am wondering if being Paleo and losing weight is making me more sensitive to omega-6 fats or possibly some of the compounds that are found in factory-raised meat.

B14dc4aa1ddefbec3bc09550428ee493

(3909)

on July 22, 2011
at 04:12 AM

Are you sure it wasn't the alcohol that you had on an empty stomach? That seems like a more likely culprit to me.

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on July 27, 2011
at 01:25 AM

A half of a beer definitely would not affect me nor give me a headache. Even bad beer :-).

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