5

votes

eating the cartilage of a chicken

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created March 16, 2012 at 7:22 PM

OK so my baby girl is 13 months old but can devour a chicken leg like you wouldn't believe. The other day she bit off the end of the bone and it freaked me out but when I went to fish it out of her mouth she had eaten it already. My hubby said it's just the cartilage so no biggie. But now I'm wondering if maybe it's a good thing and I should continue to let her eat it and then knaw on the bone after. Seriously she's like a dog.

So my question is, is eating the cartilage of a chicken or any animal really OK for my baby girl?

Eta: I just gave her a whole chicken wing to see what she would do with it and girl ate the bones! Do I have a Hannibal lecter on my hands? haha

618fc5298c4a96b817c4918c795a875f

(1217)

on March 23, 2014
at 01:17 AM

a 13 month old child is nothing like a dog

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on March 22, 2014
at 02:32 PM

Are you seriously advocating feeding raw chicken bones to infants...?

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on March 17, 2012
at 05:17 PM

Exactly what i was going to say

F80aaa96354eb749a8a5efdda3feba7d

(457)

on March 16, 2012
at 09:43 PM

Thanks for this. I will definitely be giving her the cartilage after I take it off. And maybe as she gets older let her do it herself.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 16, 2012
at 08:31 PM

Nothing wrong with eating cartilage if it doesn't get stuck in her throat. Maybe cut it up into small pieces for her. But bones-NO!! Even dogs can choke on chicken bones- they splinter and get stuck. Never let her eat those!

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 16, 2012
at 07:55 PM

I'm with your dad. Frankly, I always thought everyone ate them until I got married and found I was the odd one that did. I didn't stop, though.

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9 Answers

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5
518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on March 16, 2012
at 07:48 PM

My dad used to say cartilage makes your bones strong, and showed us how to "eat it like an animal" when we were little. It's basically a bunch of extracellular matrix with collagen mixed in, so as far as content goes it shouldn't be any trouble, just a healthy side of collagen!

The only thing would be that, of course, it is a choking hazard and when bitten off haphazardly, could lead to taking a few bone shards in with the cartilage, which could be a pain on the gums, so maybe take the time to remove it from the bone yourself if the young'un is showing enthusiasm with perhaps a touch too much recklessness!

F80aaa96354eb749a8a5efdda3feba7d

(457)

on March 16, 2012
at 09:43 PM

Thanks for this. I will definitely be giving her the cartilage after I take it off. And maybe as she gets older let her do it herself.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 16, 2012
at 07:55 PM

I'm with your dad. Frankly, I always thought everyone ate them until I got married and found I was the odd one that did. I didn't stop, though.

3
0d3873eb2dd0447baf06139e75c10252

(600)

on March 16, 2012
at 07:50 PM

I can't comment specifically on the value of cartilage for your baby- but I do know that it's very good for adults. Cartilage is, in part, what makes a good bone broth 'gel', along with marrow and chondratin. They are even sold as supplements in health food stores for healthy joints or to prevent/treat arthritic pain. All the minerals and proteins- having already been used structurally by another organism- are easy for the body to utilize.

Maybe a choking hazard, though.

3
7d01d86c539003eed77cf901bf037412

(1076)

on March 16, 2012
at 07:49 PM

I personally crunch up and eat the ends of chicken bones, and I've been doing that for decades.

But I wouldn't let a 13 month old do this. The knob of cartilage on the end of a chicken bone is a perfect size to block her windpipe. There's no harm nutritionally, but considerable choking risk.

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on March 17, 2012
at 05:17 PM

Exactly what i was going to say

2
48b2a8e6d223d996957e1adaf8877eff

on March 16, 2012
at 10:18 PM

My family all chew on the cartilage and bones. I think, like anything it can be a choking hazard, but even more so when we try to cut them up into "bite size" pieces. Naturally I bet most will chew down the parts (cartilage and bone) and not try to just inhale or swallow.

Think, hot dogs cause choking so most think they need to cut them into bite sized pieces (which are perfect size for choking) whereas you could hand your kid a hot dog (ewww gross, who eats those, we don't) and they will chew on the "meat" bit by bit. No choking threat.

We feed our dogs raw meaty bones, chicken with bone in, and other meat with bone in. We only have to worry when it is too small and they think they can swallow it without chewing.

One rule in our house is the kids can not eat by themselves. Another is no horseplay while eating. We monitor and are aware when our kids are eating raw or cooked meats.

0
0f8f77156cd0667d43194fc4b8bc3b5d

on March 23, 2014
at 05:02 AM

Once a chicken carcass has been in my pressure cooker for 4-5 hours to make broth, the bones are soft as clay and very tasty, so I eat most of the bones along with the bone broth.

0
Eb1b16df32293421e477bace7a72a36d

on March 22, 2014
at 10:54 PM

Ever since I noticed how much my cats love to woof done the *entire* chicken bone when I'm done with it, I've looked at all the non-meat portions of chicken in a different way. Must be some good stuff in there if it's worth crunching through an entire bone. I know that everyone says that cooked bones can splinter in your pet's mouth, but they seem to do fine. I do watch them carefully, while they're eating, just to be sure.

Robb Wolf talks all the time about the benefits of bone broths. Maybe you can get similar (or even increased) benefits from eating the easier-to-chew portions of the bone. Come to think of it, why have I been wasting that bony goodness on my cats??

0
0a4c4ba724ded8997cf6e129cc8b6eb0

on April 10, 2013
at 07:34 PM

Cooked chicken bones will splinter and cause problems for dogs. raw bones are not only fine, but super healthy. Please research. Dogs in the wild eat bones all the time. My dog lived on them for about two years. trust me, it was not luck.

618fc5298c4a96b817c4918c795a875f

(1217)

on March 23, 2014
at 01:17 AM

a 13 month old child is nothing like a dog

0
A0f66aea8dda0e83147ca9796eb7a25b

on September 16, 2012
at 01:35 AM

Chicken bones splinter...they do. Anyone who feeds them to their dogs are just very lucky they have not ran into any problems yet..key word "yet". I have taken in one of my neighbors dogs to the vet because a bone had splintered and got stuck in the back of the dogs throat. No one noticed except when the dog started losing weight.. I looked back into it's throat and it was stuck in both ends embeded and swollen and painful, too painful for the dog to eat. They were actually lucky it was the throat because the splinters can get stuck in the digestive tract. Cartilage is wonderfully healthy but again cut into small pieces or ground. Please.. throw the bones away.

0
18d89478c2fbd0a69889ae094f5fa5d3

on March 16, 2012
at 09:11 PM

Bones are fine to eat as long as they are raw and not cooked. They will only splinter/cause harm if they are cooked. That's not to say there is no choking hazard, you can choke on anything, even your own tongue.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on March 22, 2014
at 02:32 PM

Are you seriously advocating feeding raw chicken bones to infants...?

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