1

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Do you skim the fat?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 03, 2011 at 5:25 PM

I bought a rotisserie chicken and figured I'd use the leftover bones to make broth, which sounds like a good Paleo food since it's rich in Omega-3 fatty acids right? Normally people skim the fat off chicken broth though. Should I do so with bone broth soup as well? My guess is that strips the soup of the healthy fats as well.

C3edabc6267abec9b5f8178e5d73552c

(725)

on December 03, 2011
at 06:35 PM

you don't need to skim the fat. Just let it cool and the fat will solidify on top and you can easily discard it then..

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6 Answers

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4
F3fc2e0a9577e7e481a387d917904d1e

(1070)

on December 03, 2011
at 05:42 PM

Poultry is NOT high in omega-3. Quite the opposite, in fact:

http://donmatesz.blogspot.com/2011/01/practically-primal-guide-to_21.html

4
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 03, 2011
at 05:35 PM

If you want to use it, fine. BUT, it's high in O6 I believe, not O3.

Also, unless they said otherwise, the chicken will have been seasoned/flavored with many things probably including soy and industrial seed oils.

In the past, on SAD, I used the bones and the fat and it probably wasn't the worst thing I ate. Now, I might use the bones and meat but I'd skim the fat and add something healthy.

2
Dfada6fe4982ab3b7557172f20632da8

(5332)

on December 03, 2011
at 07:55 PM

If it's a good chicken, then eat as much of it as you can. If it's a bad chicken, then don't.

If it's a well-raised animal, I don't see the benefit of worrying about micro-managing different fats and trying to breed a 'chicken-coconut'.

2
13a44ea00b0c9af0b6d0f3d5f5c2cfca

(7223)

on December 03, 2011
at 06:04 PM

I don't skim it if it is a pastured chicken from a local farm that I roasted myself, but for a industrially grown, commercially roasted rotisserie chicken I definitely would recommend skimming all the fat and I wouldn't use the skin for broth either since it was likely coated with all kinds of chemical flavoring agents and industrial oils.

Also, chicken is pretty low in omega 3s and high in omega 6s. The ratio is much, much better if you choose a biodynamically raised pastured chicken, but it's still heavy on the omega 6 fats.

1
Cbda678b2a6bf0537d8c4ea0ce8aa9ad

(4319)

on December 03, 2011
at 05:28 PM

This fat is good for you. I always use it. The commercial chicken will have most likely come from an unhealthy environment. But sometimes, it's the only choice.

0
5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on December 03, 2011
at 05:52 PM

I usually skim it, but don't stress too much over getting it all. Factory farmed chicken grows up in a bad environment, and that gets into the fat as well. I want to limit that exposure and dilute it with good fats like coconut, ghee, etc.

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