5

votes

I made chicken...JELLO??

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 09, 2011 at 1:18 AM

Someone please hack what happened to my bone broth?

I bought some chicken feet/heads from my local butcher to make a nutritious bone broth. I put them all in a crock pot with water and cooked it down for a long time. Then I strained the heads, necks, and feet and poured the broth into a bowl that I put in the fridge. Today (two days later), I went to check on it, and THE ENTIRE THING SOLIDIFIED. And I'm not talking about fat...no, it was giggly and gelatinous, exactly like JELLO, but with the flavor of chicken broth.

Now what?

I know gelatin is really good for you, but honestly chicken-flavored JELLO is far from appealing. Is there anyway to turn it back into broth, or should I just suck it up and eat the gelatin knowing I'm reaping health benefits?

Seriously, it's pretty gross.

95eda9fa0cec952b482e869c34a566b6

on October 09, 2011
at 11:02 PM

That's what real broth looks like when it's cold! You made a great batch. Now heat it up and eat that healthy stuff!

4ccf5d9bba64e54fc95802fe8ae33c47

(900)

on October 09, 2011
at 03:08 PM

I used to make lots of chicken stock but with bones only and let it simmer for up to 12 hours or more. It would always turn into gel. I can't eat chicken anymore since I moved to Delmarva.

4ccf5d9bba64e54fc95802fe8ae33c47

(900)

on October 09, 2011
at 03:04 PM

You can always find things like whole chicken feet at places where they sell raw meat and whole prey for our companion carnivores, like here https://www.hare-today.com/, and yes they are of course NOT allowed for human consumption...but I mean the USDA is not sitting on your kitchen counter, and beware if you are thinking of meat for cats and dogs, it is (purposely) not bled out...and "whole prey" means whole animal, feathers, fur, and all.

220994a1bcff1923ef0388192bdba8d4

on October 09, 2011
at 02:57 PM

Yes, I basically made a stock of just feet, so that must be why it was so gelatinous.

Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on October 09, 2011
at 02:50 PM

EXCELLENT -- you made PERFECT stock! The gelatin is caused by proteins and minerals that are suspended in the hot liquid, and re-form a "matrix" as it cools. As soon as you warm it up, it will liquify again. It's just perfect!!!

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 09, 2011
at 01:33 PM

its always been hit or miss with chicken for me, too and I been making stock for years and years. If you can get feet then it will always gel up but most people cant find them. Even a lot of pastured chickens wont gel Ive found. Luckily oxtails are pretty available in cities and those things will *always* gel.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on October 09, 2011
at 08:05 AM

Pat yourself on the back for a job well done.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on October 09, 2011
at 03:00 AM

That's real broth for ya! Just warm it up and eat it as a soup. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Consomm%C3%A9

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on October 09, 2011
at 01:34 AM

Yep you just need heat to liquefy the mass. Sounds like you made a perfect batch so congratulations!

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 09, 2011
at 01:22 AM

Heat it up with some water: soup.

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9 Answers

12
C491ff8ce20d5c17f8f7ff94392a9570

(1617)

on October 09, 2011
at 03:16 AM

Hah! I try to end up with chicken jello on purpose! Congratulations, it means your broth is full of great stuff. :) As soon as you reheat it it will melt back into liquid.

10
7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on October 09, 2011
at 01:22 AM

If you reheat it, it will turn back to broth. And it's not really gross, it's good broth full of gelatin!

3
5b69a02dadcae753771921d913909215

(1457)

on October 09, 2011
at 01:47 AM

Gelatin is jello. Warm it up. It solidified because you made it cold. Like water to ice but at a different temperature and part of it remained not too solid hence the jiggiliness.

2
4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on October 09, 2011
at 07:54 AM

Perfect stock! If it doesn't go wiggly in the fridge then I know I've failed. It is lovely just heated up and seasoned. And it is a good anti cold remedy!

2
F15e0bae42dbf0b8cfc71e62902497b4

on October 09, 2011
at 05:54 AM

you're doing it right, that's how Jello is made, by cooking collagen-rich animal bits (like heads, necks and feet) and cooling it.

Just heat it up and it will be a lovely broth.

2
C3cb7270d23572bf00bcdbd09efc4b70

on October 09, 2011
at 03:14 AM

This happened to me, and I thought I was going to throw up when I defrosted it to make soup. The things you learn when you go paleo! It was fine after I warmed it up, and it was delicious. Besides, gelatin is very good for you and your skin.

1
C803c65555a42f13bf60f873c2923715

on October 09, 2011
at 09:56 PM

Congratulations, you did it right! I make stock frequently, and it doesn't always gel. It help a lot to use chicken feet, and it also makes a difference what your water-to-bones ratio is. I simmer my bones and feet (combo of bones and carcasses from previously cooked chickens, plus raw feet, raw neck and back bones, when I have them) for at least 24 hours. I also add onions and celery, carrots if I have them, for the last few hours. At that point the bones have really softened and I pull them out, drain them and give to the dogs. I know, people say not to give cooked bones to dogs, but when they have been simmering for 24 + hours, they are plenty soft and my big Rhodesian Ridgebacks have no trouble crunching them up. Obviously, there are nutrients left in the bones so theoretically I could cook mine longer, but the cost of fuel isn't trivial, and I like sharing with the dogs.

1
C2450eb7fa11b37473599caf93b461ef

on October 09, 2011
at 12:06 PM

I haven't once been able to get my chicken stock to be gelatinous. Nice work! I'm jealous!

4ccf5d9bba64e54fc95802fe8ae33c47

(900)

on October 09, 2011
at 03:04 PM

You can always find things like whole chicken feet at places where they sell raw meat and whole prey for our companion carnivores, like here https://www.hare-today.com/, and yes they are of course NOT allowed for human consumption...but I mean the USDA is not sitting on your kitchen counter, and beware if you are thinking of meat for cats and dogs, it is (purposely) not bled out...and "whole prey" means whole animal, feathers, fur, and all.

4ccf5d9bba64e54fc95802fe8ae33c47

(900)

on October 09, 2011
at 03:08 PM

I used to make lots of chicken stock but with bones only and let it simmer for up to 12 hours or more. It would always turn into gel. I can't eat chicken anymore since I moved to Delmarva.

220994a1bcff1923ef0388192bdba8d4

on October 09, 2011
at 02:57 PM

Yes, I basically made a stock of just feet, so that must be why it was so gelatinous.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 09, 2011
at 01:33 PM

its always been hit or miss with chicken for me, too and I been making stock for years and years. If you can get feet then it will always gel up but most people cant find them. Even a lot of pastured chickens wont gel Ive found. Luckily oxtails are pretty available in cities and those things will *always* gel.

0
24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on October 09, 2011
at 12:18 PM

Congratulations! This is your goal! I was surprised once by my pork bone broth because it did not seem to take on the slightest body. I ran out of containers and used 2L soda bottles to store it temporarily in the fridge. I went to pour it out making soup a day later and nada! Had to squeeze it out in bloops LOL. For me pork shoulder bones really solidify a broth like nothing else.

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