2

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Can I throw away my 9 day old chicken stock?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 02, 2012 at 4:00 PM

Nooooo..!

Nine days ago I bought 10 organic chickens which were on sale. After deboning them and freezing the breasts and thighs I simmered the carcasses to make some stock. Unfortunatly I forgot to transfer the stock from the fridge to the freezer the next day. I rarely use the fridge in my basement and found out today that I left the stock out... It still smells like chicken stock but I'm not sure if I should be using it? (even after boiling)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 02, 2012
at 05:19 PM

I think I'd re-boil it before testing a spoonful just in case. Usually if it has a fat seal and/or has gelled it lasts longer.

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on March 02, 2012
at 05:11 PM

Aha, makes sense. Thanks!

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on March 02, 2012
at 04:24 PM

The fat cap is a good point. Aerobic bacteria usually grow faster than anaerobic ones, which is why you can preserve meats with confit and other fat-packing methods. I would boil it again before use, but that's just me.

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6 Answers

best answer

6
24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on March 02, 2012
at 04:19 PM

I had some in my fridge for a couple weeks- it smelled fine, then I used it and I'm ok! :) I admit I was a little nervous! Mine had a layer of fat covering the top; I'm not sure how true it is, but I've read the layer of fat helps to keep bacteria from growing in the broth. Works for me!

24fcc21452ebe39c032be6801d6bbadd

(9812)

on March 02, 2012
at 05:11 PM

Aha, makes sense. Thanks!

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on March 02, 2012
at 04:24 PM

The fat cap is a good point. Aerobic bacteria usually grow faster than anaerobic ones, which is why you can preserve meats with confit and other fat-packing methods. I would boil it again before use, but that's just me.

5
Medium avatar

(12379)

on March 02, 2012
at 04:16 PM

If it's gone bad you would know it the INSTANT you opened the container. Do a spoon taste-test to confirm, but if it doesn't smell wretched (as spoiled chicken stock would) you are ok. But use it soon - it will be turning quickly.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 02, 2012
at 05:19 PM

I think I'd re-boil it before testing a spoonful just in case. Usually if it has a fat seal and/or has gelled it lasts longer.

2
9b47142b8ed1074a94b5654410740530

on March 03, 2012
at 01:51 AM

Keep it. Use it. Especially if there's a layer of fat on the top. The fat will protect the broth from bacteria. It's like pouring wax over canned preserves. And the fat itself doesn't need to be protected. My parents used to leave a crock full of bacon fat on their counter. Never refrigerated it. They used it to cook food and even buttered their bread with it. So I think your chicken fat is safe too.

2
Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

on March 02, 2012
at 04:17 PM

I'm pretty sure the official advice would be no. We are after all chronically germ-averse. Personally, I am not well organised or wasteful enough for that and so tend to trust (and work on improving) my own senses. It might kill me one day I suppose.

1
Fe33d1321dad116f6fedd60266d0498b

on March 03, 2012
at 01:16 AM

Did you just leave it in the fridge, or actually leave it out? Fridge- fine for your own consumption no doubt, but i'd probably not serve it to company, just in case. If you left it totally out- just pitch it.

1
183f5c49a7a9548b6f5238d1f33cb35e

on March 02, 2012
at 09:11 PM

I would still use broth that even smells slightly stale - I use stale broth in curries and sauces. Never bothered my gut in anyway. Disclaimer - I am a slob.

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