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Chestnut flour-Paleo or not

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created March 28, 2012 at 3:13 PM

I am tired of the same almond,coconut bread.Has anybody experimented with chestnut flour?If so do you have a recipy

3c7150f971f65f52bb066bf21baa0f1d

(190)

on April 18, 2012
at 08:07 PM

Simply! For 5 medium pancakes: 150 g of chestnut flour, 2 whole eggs, 200 ml of water or whole organic milk. Add if you want raisins or sultanins! I eat these with smoked salmon!

Fd1c5e35538fbe2ea5eccb8acd7ae546

(496)

on March 29, 2012
at 01:26 PM

Do you have the recipy for the pancakes

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on March 29, 2012
at 10:48 AM

I hope you enjoy! Just realize: it doesn't rise like a bread! :-) also, it's definitely savory.

Fd1c5e35538fbe2ea5eccb8acd7ae546

(496)

on March 29, 2012
at 05:25 AM

Can't wait to try that cake,sounds delicious.Thank you

Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on March 28, 2012
at 07:55 PM

Well, you went exactly where I did. I grew up in a household with a heavy Sicilian influence, and chestnuts were a mainstream starch around our house. One of the very first cakes I ever made was casagnaccio, and one of the very first handmade pastas I ever made was stracci de castagna (Chestnut Rags) -- which I've since learned to make with chestnut flour as the key ingredient, and arrowroot powder, fine coconut flour, or tapioca flour replacing wheat as the secondary flour.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on March 28, 2012
at 07:52 PM

deliciousness!!

  • Fd1c5e35538fbe2ea5eccb8acd7ae546

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3 Answers

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4
Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on March 28, 2012
at 03:31 PM

Chestnuts and chestnut flour are, IMHO, paleo as much as starchy tubers. For a nut, they have an incredible amount of starch like tubers.

My ancestors made the best foods from chestnut flour: the Italians make a variety of savory things with chestnuts. Though chestnuts were eaten throughout antiquity, chestnut flour became especially popular in Italy long after agriculture in modern times when the poorer, countryside people could not afford or would have had easy access to refined wheat flours.

Here's a traditional recipe for castagnaccio (with some additions/alterations by me). Castagnaccio is a savory chestnut flour bread type food.

===

Castagnaccio

  • 1lb chestnut flour
  • 2tbsp arrowroot powder
  • 3tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • salt
  • 70g raisins
  • 40g pinenuts
  • 40g walnuts
  • rosemary (dried or fresh)
  • 3?? cup water
  • butter or lard to grease the pan
  • Baking pan

Soak the raisins for about 20-30 minutes in luke warm water.

Sift the flour and arrowroot into mixing bowl and gradually add 3?? c of water, whisking to avoid lumps forming, until you have a smooth paste, which will seem runny. Amount of water needed may vary.

Preheat oven to 365F.

Squeeze out the water in the raisins. Break or chop the walnuts into coarse pieces. Add 2 tbsp of oil, a pinch of salt, the raisins, pinenuts, and walnuts to the batter.

Grease pan thoroughly with butter or lard, 1cm to 1inch up the sides. Pour batter in the pan, sprinkle some rosemary leaves on top and drizzle or spray 1 tbsp of oil over. Put in the oven for 40 minutes. A toothpick should come clean -- but do not leave it too long! The cake will be moist, but not wet.

Let sit 30 minutes. Cut and serve as desired.

===

A basic castagnaccio will have pinenuts, rosemary, and olive oil. Everything else is up to the baker! Some people use orange rind, for e.g.

Enjoy!

Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on March 28, 2012
at 07:55 PM

Well, you went exactly where I did. I grew up in a household with a heavy Sicilian influence, and chestnuts were a mainstream starch around our house. One of the very first cakes I ever made was casagnaccio, and one of the very first handmade pastas I ever made was stracci de castagna (Chestnut Rags) -- which I've since learned to make with chestnut flour as the key ingredient, and arrowroot powder, fine coconut flour, or tapioca flour replacing wheat as the secondary flour.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on March 29, 2012
at 10:48 AM

I hope you enjoy! Just realize: it doesn't rise like a bread! :-) also, it's definitely savory.

Fd1c5e35538fbe2ea5eccb8acd7ae546

(496)

on March 29, 2012
at 05:25 AM

Can't wait to try that cake,sounds delicious.Thank you

1
3c7150f971f65f52bb066bf21baa0f1d

on March 29, 2012
at 12:25 PM

IMHO chestnut is a present from gods! :D

Anyway this nut and his tree are 60 million years old, so Cenozoic Era. If we see in a classic pale way I'd say that it is not a paleoFood because it needs to be cooked or boiled to eat. But this wonderful stuff has an excellent nutrition facts and it's a particular kind of nuts full of starchy carb (78/100 g), little fat (4/100g), little complete protein (5/100g) and fiber (8/100g).

This is some interesting points of the spectrum of the chestnut flour 100 g (dried chestnut too):

  • Potassium 991mg 28%
  • Magnesium 74.0mg 18%
  • Manganese 1.2mg 59%
  • Thiamin 0.4mg 24%
  • Vitamin B6 0.7mg 33%
  • Folate 110mcg 27%

Another important benefit is the alkaline feature: -9.7 PRAL PH on 100 g.

I have got a lot of dried and flour chestnuts in my kitchen because i live in a mountain zone where it's easy to find out in autumn, I love walking through the forest and gathering them when the yellow/red leaves fall down. I use these instead of pumpkin and squash for my dinner or snacks. I'm going to do a "Castagnaccio" with macadamia, pine nuts, walnuts and raisins and some pancake for post workout meal.

Fd1c5e35538fbe2ea5eccb8acd7ae546

(496)

on March 29, 2012
at 01:26 PM

Do you have the recipy for the pancakes

3c7150f971f65f52bb066bf21baa0f1d

(190)

on April 18, 2012
at 08:07 PM

Simply! For 5 medium pancakes: 150 g of chestnut flour, 2 whole eggs, 200 ml of water or whole organic milk. Add if you want raisins or sultanins! I eat these with smoked salmon!

1
Medium avatar

(19479)

on March 28, 2012
at 07:46 PM

I definitely think that chestnuts are as paleo as any other food, if not more so because of their cultural significance.

After the holidays, I found quite a few sales on European chestnuts and did a little recipe experimentation. Apparently, combining chestnuts with sausage is a typical way for them to be prepared in some European countries, however, the American chestnut was a staple food for many Native American Indian tribes.

Unfortunately, the American chestnut was almost completely wiped out by a fungal blight, but there is a group (The American Chestnut Foundation) dedicated to bringing them back by propagating blight-resistant chestnut varieties.

chestnut-flour-paleo-or-not

(recipe here)

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on March 28, 2012
at 07:52 PM

deliciousness!!

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