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Do you (and how) filter your water?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 08, 2012 at 1:10 PM

Do you filter your water? How do you do it? Reverse Osmosis, Carbon, etc.

Between the chemical runoff and the government actually ADDING chemicals to the water it seems that a water filter is a necessity.

What do you use if anything?

A089b683ee0498f2b21b7edfa300e405

(3895)

on June 09, 2012
at 04:07 AM

Its not about safety. RO water is as safe as it gets; but it is completely unnatural. I cannot think of any natural source of such pure water. So filtering out the harmful stuff and adding back some naturally occurring minerals makes sense to me.

7660f5a0ec906d3922d79b20f3434ecc

(788)

on June 08, 2012
at 06:28 PM

I've been thinking about this as my parents have a RO filter. Do you think RO water needs to be re-mineralized in order to drink safely?

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on June 08, 2012
at 04:26 PM

http://www.quickmeme.com/meme/3pmy9y/

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on June 08, 2012
at 04:26 PM

http://qkme.me/3pmy9y

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16 Answers

1
4a345ae9eacb8c598154f3b57a909a50

on June 12, 2012
at 06:53 PM

I use a whole-house filtration system. This one is the best out there. http://amacwater.com/whole-house-filtration

1
584cdd1a2dd83e46b8b76758f4c57b19

(600)

on June 08, 2012
at 06:13 PM

I don't filter my water per say but each night I boil up 3 litres to take to work with me. I don't know if it makes it healthier though it does help me keep track of my water intake (before paleo I was lucky if I drank 1 glass a fortnight)

1
C6e32ff9978fe287aa8c1c6be52d9524

(1548)

on June 08, 2012
at 02:17 PM

I forage my water. I have a natural running spring nearby. I have three, five-gallon glass bottles. I have a spring that's about 8 minutes from my house. Every 2 weeks, I go and forage all my water fresh from the spring.

www.findaspring.com has some resources. Or, you can get in touch with some locals (usually more country-folk) to find out if there are any local springs. I can honestly, HONESTLY, say I felt a health difference alone from switching to tap/filtered water to spring water.

However, when I have a family, I am sure I will figure out some kind of whole water filtration system.

1
7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d

(5959)

on June 08, 2012
at 01:13 PM

Our household water is rain collected off the roof and stored in a 15,000 gallon cistern. But, because of mercury pollution, we still run our drinking water through reverse osmosis to remove everything before remineralizing it with a calcite cartridge and a Japanese Wellness Filter.

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on June 08, 2012
at 04:26 PM

http://www.quickmeme.com/meme/3pmy9y/

De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on June 08, 2012
at 04:26 PM

http://qkme.me/3pmy9y

0
A089b683ee0498f2b21b7edfa300e405

on June 08, 2012
at 06:02 PM

I use a reverse osmosis machine. After that I use these drops to re-mineralize the water.

http://www.traceminerals.com/products/liquid-tablet-minerals/concentrace-ionic-minerals

7660f5a0ec906d3922d79b20f3434ecc

(788)

on June 08, 2012
at 06:28 PM

I've been thinking about this as my parents have a RO filter. Do you think RO water needs to be re-mineralized in order to drink safely?

A089b683ee0498f2b21b7edfa300e405

(3895)

on June 09, 2012
at 04:07 AM

Its not about safety. RO water is as safe as it gets; but it is completely unnatural. I cannot think of any natural source of such pure water. So filtering out the harmful stuff and adding back some naturally occurring minerals makes sense to me.

0
D63a9a7789b948a1e88647f6c0e504ca

on June 08, 2012
at 05:49 PM

I have a reverse osmosis filter, as I really want in particular to get the fluoride out and it's the only thing that does. Not cheap but I've never regretted getting it.

0
B514acafd0a6cc251279b6cb21b48941

on June 08, 2012
at 05:06 PM

I love the taste of real spring water. I always take an empty bottle with me when I go hiking. Normally though, I just drink tap. However, now that I've moved into my current place, we have well water, which has a rust color to it, so I now use a Brita filter.

0
8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

on June 08, 2012
at 05:00 PM

Big Berkey filter since it's portable, tastes great, doesn't use electricity (useful in a power outrage or developing country), can remove arsenic, fluoride, and pathogens.

http://www.bigberkeywaterfilters.com/berkey_filter_comparison

0
44f0901d5b0e85d8b00315c892d00f8a

on June 08, 2012
at 03:02 PM

Slow Sand Filtration

Slow sand filtration is a simple and inexpensive method of filtering water. These filters comprise a gravel layer at the bottom of a tank followed by layers of coarse sand and fine sand. Such filters should be at least 39 inches deep with a minimum of 27 inches of sand. They filter water at about 0.15 gallons per minute per square foot of the top layer's surface area. Slow sand filters remove most pathogens but have limited effectiveness at removing organic chemicals and dissolved heavy metals.

Ultraviolet Light Purification

The sun's ultraviolet rays are one of the most natural methods of water purification. Most bacteria and parasites can withstand several days of exposure to intense direct sunlight, so UV filtration systems usually involve artificial UV lamps. The lamp's wavelength should be roughly 254 nm, and filtered water should receive UV exposure of 40,000 µW/cm2, according to EPA guidelines. For individuals unsure of how to measure UV exposure, commercial lamps exist with clearly published UV exposure ratings. Most commercial filters purify 1 to 9 gallons of water per minute. UV filters are highly effective against bacteria and other parasites but won't remove inorganic contaminants from water.

Sedimentation Filters

Natural sedimentation filters work best with wells or other large sources of water. These filters function much like sand filters but use additional materials and more than one tank. In such a filter, water passes through an upper tank filled with fine sediment. Heavier contaminants sink to the bottom of the tank while pumps push the water from the first tank's upper layer into a second tank. Water then passes through layers of sand, carbon and gravel to filter additional contaminants. Sedimentation filtration can be highly effective, but its safety and efficiency vary dramatically based on the amount and quality of the filtration material used.

Emergency Filtering

One common method of filtering water in emergency conditions is passing boiling water through a cloth. "The Backpacker's Field Manual" recommends bringing water to a rapid boil for one minute. Boiling water will kill all organic pathogens but is not foolproof. Simmering water should be poured slowly through a clean cloth to remove additional inorganic contaminants. This method will not remove dissolved or microscopic contaminants.

0
4ec0fe4b4aab327f7efa2dfb06b032ff

(5145)

on June 08, 2012
at 02:57 PM

I use a Brita filter, but honestly I have doubts about its effectiveness. The tap water here (Baltimore) actually tastes good. I don't know about pollutants in it though.

0
59e818af2184847f09c8a63a45adcdbb

on June 08, 2012
at 02:40 PM

I use a countertop distiller, maybe im removing some good minerals, but im sure im removing more bad stuff(as is evident from the sludge that accumulates in the bottom of it after a few liters have gone through!). Also its not plumbed in, good if your slightly nomadic..

0
8e3782b68e033763485472f414f507a5

(2433)

on June 08, 2012
at 02:13 PM

I've found Big Berkey's water filters to be rock solid. I've tested them: they even remove food coloring for crying out loud.

0
Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on June 08, 2012
at 01:46 PM

The tap water in our region (Switzerland - just across the lake from Evian!) is of excellent quality. But when I am soaking/fermenting things I run it through a Brita filter to remove any chlorine just in case. THere is also a local spring where I can fill up bottles - it's supposedly the fountain of youth.

0
Baa413654789b57f3579474ca7fa43d7

(2349)

on June 08, 2012
at 01:19 PM

I use a Brita filter (carbon) water pitcher.

0
41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on June 08, 2012
at 01:17 PM

I don't right now, but I used to have a reverse osmosis filter. I loved it. I miss it :(

0
87b7d250ea30415ed4c1afd809f4053f

on June 08, 2012
at 01:13 PM

Yes, I use a water distiller which removes most Fluoride, Bacteria etc. Tastes really nice too.

Absolutely can't drink the water out of the tap. Since we've been distilling our water, when you turn the tap on all we can smell is algae and chlorine, yuk. My husband used to puk if he drank non chilled tap water. Now he guzzles heaps of distilled water happily.

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