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Blue Cheese Stink

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 23, 2012 at 11:02 PM

Blue cheese wasn't high on my list - sophisticated taste, but too bitter.

Recently I put aside a piece of the pasteurised stuff, wrapped in cellophane, and accidentally left it for a few days at room temp. When I discovered the cheese it was slightly brown, very sweaty. I decided to taste ... sweet and delicious, total umami.

Stilton etc is supposed to be kept under cover at room temp for a while. But this was extreme, on the edge of rotting, lots of bacteria. I could have died!

The taste is enough to keep me coming back, and I guess it's good for gut flora.

Any views on paleo/anti-inflammatory cost/benefits?

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on November 24, 2012
at 09:08 AM

Do not know anything about blue cheese, sorry, except that it does contain gluten. Not sure why but it is definitely not gluten-free.

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2 Answers

1
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on January 02, 2013
at 12:14 AM

I personally have a very high tolerance for cheese that is old, moldy, etc. I have never once gotten sick or had the least digestive problem from even very old cheese. The one exception is fresh milk cheese such as fresh mozzarella or chevre which definitely spoils just like fresh dairy does. But something like blue cheese, stilton, etc. only seems to get better.

I actually don't know the difference from a microbial perspective between fresh blue cheese (which is infected by mold) and blue cheeese that has been sitting in the fridge for a week or two and has a little bit of furry mold growing on it. I sometimes will cut the outside 1/8-1/4" off of the cheese and eat the rest.

Perhaps you have heard of casu marzu...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casu_marzu

1
0b73cdbd0cb68aeeda14dafeebb2f828

on December 18, 2012
at 05:54 PM

Could cheese be the missing piece in the French paradox puzzle? http://bit.ly/YgWKBn

These guys are researching the anti-inflammatory potential of blue cheese. I think they may be missing the benefits of Vitamin K. It is also likely that the live bacteria will alter the make up of your gut flora and clearly the French do have some advantages when it comes to longevity and heart disease.

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