1

votes

Cheese. Low carb/high fat/causes little insulin response. Thoughts?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 15, 2012 at 9:28 PM

Definitely can make a meal more interesting. Anyone use in moderation for weight loss when restricting carbs?

6df350b5d48c7f66ff70e532e2ffbf11

(45)

on March 16, 2012
at 06:33 PM

I actually do seek as low of insulin levels as possible. Not necessarily for weight loss, but I have PCOS and it's imperative I keep my insulin levels low for that reason. I try to not get more than about 80g protein a day, and im trying to shift the remaining balance towards more fat and less carbs (I love me some veg though).

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on March 16, 2012
at 01:22 PM

It's the "you can't milk a wild animal" reasoning. Which, yes, is true. But milk was obviously being consumed if the kill was a lactating female. I think Kurt Harris was the one to finally come in and tell everyone it was silly to forgo dairy unless it gave you problems. I agree with that and I think most have come around to this way of thinking.

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on March 16, 2012
at 08:13 AM

Great answer...

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on March 16, 2012
at 07:29 AM

So you think that the insulin from protein will hinder weight loss? How does this make any sense. Any food with protein will make you release insulin, therefore you should probably avoid steak, chicken, pork, fish, etc. Insulin doesn't hinder weight loss, and plays an important role in pushing protein to your muscles.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on March 16, 2012
at 07:22 AM

I never really understood the reasoning behind why it wasn't paleo. We can eat all parts of grass-fed beef (we're not talking hunter gatherer here, these are not wild animals) but not drink their milk or transform it into cheese using traditional methods? Philosophically I have a disconnect here.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on March 16, 2012
at 12:50 AM

Oh o.k. Well I stand by my statement that most dairy elicits an insulin response (disagree that the jury is out on fermented dairy) but many here don't think that's a problem and those who do just suck it up and deal with it because life without cheese and yogurt can be downright brutal if you're eating low carb. I say when in doubt eat the cheese. Life is short and cheese is tasty.

6df350b5d48c7f66ff70e532e2ffbf11

(45)

on March 15, 2012
at 10:06 PM

Well typically the insulin response to dairy is due to the whey protein. Therefore, the jury is still out on Greek yogurt because it has the whey protein strained out and there just isn't any research showing whether casein has the same effect on insulin as whey. Then there is cheese and butter, both having a much larger proportion of fat and thus blunting the insulin response. Of course I do realize that cheese isn't paleo per se, but due to its small insulin response and high fat content, it can't be missing the mark too far. I guess it wasnt a question. Just wanting some thoughts..

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6 Answers

4
E753cf7753e7be889ca68b1a4203483f

on March 16, 2012
at 07:54 AM

Cheese causes insulin release, even though there is little carbs and whey in it. Any Animal protein causes considerable insulin response, I would suspect that if you were to mix a number of vegetable proteins together, so you would end up with something that resembles animal protein in quality, that too will give a large insulin response. If one were to seek as low insulin levels as possible, a low carb/low protein diet is most effective. For fat loss however, a fair amount of animal protein seems to help the vast majority of people, and cheese are OK in that aspect, it's however a energy rich food, so moderation might be vise :)

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on March 16, 2012
at 08:13 AM

Great answer...

6df350b5d48c7f66ff70e532e2ffbf11

(45)

on March 16, 2012
at 06:33 PM

I actually do seek as low of insulin levels as possible. Not necessarily for weight loss, but I have PCOS and it's imperative I keep my insulin levels low for that reason. I try to not get more than about 80g protein a day, and im trying to shift the remaining balance towards more fat and less carbs (I love me some veg though).

2
F3920b85be76a5d8cf466d805bfb99e4

(638)

on March 16, 2012
at 01:08 PM

I use cheese as I would a spice... a little goes a long way for adding flavor to food. Since I don't use as much quantity anymore, I make sure to get high quality. Some things just make life better, and for me, fine cheese is one of those. As is fresh ground coffee, fresh herbs, dark chocolate.... all in moderation of course.

2
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on March 16, 2012
at 05:42 AM

Cheese is fine however it is a calorie dense food. If you can use it every once in awhile then it might work for you to include in a weight loss diet. If you put cheese on everything then it should be left out.

0
Cf89b6767687599fbbd8733757b5f215

(120)

on March 16, 2012
at 12:35 PM

So what say ye to a bit of full fat organic cream?

0
60af23519906aa54b742ffc17477c3d3

(1186)

on March 16, 2012
at 04:55 AM

I use goat cheese in moderation without trouble. My problem with cheese is the digestion of cows (it's different from ours and makes it hard for the body to process). I don't have trouble with lactose and am perfectly fine with goat cheese.

I am fairly sure it is higher in fat than cow's (I'm not sure about this) but the goat feta I use has 1g of carbs per serving (80 cals, 8g protein) so I am happy with that. Goes great in eggs or if you have ground bison kicking around.

0
98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

on March 15, 2012
at 09:36 PM

Most dairy does illicit an insulin response. I'm not sure I understand the question though?

6df350b5d48c7f66ff70e532e2ffbf11

(45)

on March 15, 2012
at 10:06 PM

Well typically the insulin response to dairy is due to the whey protein. Therefore, the jury is still out on Greek yogurt because it has the whey protein strained out and there just isn't any research showing whether casein has the same effect on insulin as whey. Then there is cheese and butter, both having a much larger proportion of fat and thus blunting the insulin response. Of course I do realize that cheese isn't paleo per se, but due to its small insulin response and high fat content, it can't be missing the mark too far. I guess it wasnt a question. Just wanting some thoughts..

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on March 16, 2012
at 12:50 AM

Oh o.k. Well I stand by my statement that most dairy elicits an insulin response (disagree that the jury is out on fermented dairy) but many here don't think that's a problem and those who do just suck it up and deal with it because life without cheese and yogurt can be downright brutal if you're eating low carb. I say when in doubt eat the cheese. Life is short and cheese is tasty.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on March 16, 2012
at 07:22 AM

I never really understood the reasoning behind why it wasn't paleo. We can eat all parts of grass-fed beef (we're not talking hunter gatherer here, these are not wild animals) but not drink their milk or transform it into cheese using traditional methods? Philosophically I have a disconnect here.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on March 16, 2012
at 01:22 PM

It's the "you can't milk a wild animal" reasoning. Which, yes, is true. But milk was obviously being consumed if the kill was a lactating female. I think Kurt Harris was the one to finally come in and tell everyone it was silly to forgo dairy unless it gave you problems. I agree with that and I think most have come around to this way of thinking.

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