16

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How Have Your Ideas Evolved Since You Started Eating Paleo?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created September 19, 2011 at 3:45 AM

It seems like this would've been asked by now, but I can't find a thread like it. Anyway, from when you first started eating a paleo diet, what sort of changes in outlook toward various things have you had?

I've experienced the following changes:

1) I went from thinking that fructose is a poison to thinking that its deleterious effects approach zero as physical activity increases. There's still an issue of glycation, but I think the risks of being deficient in vitamin C and potassium outweigh the risk of a little glycation.

2) I went from thinking that n-6 fats are toxic to thinking that they would probably only pose a problem in the presence of an n-3 deficiency.

3) I went from thinking that dietary fat isn't stored as body fat to realizing that not only is that not remotely true but if there were some mutation that made it so that were the case, hominins would probably have died out long ago.

4) I went from thinking low carb is best for everyone to thinking low carb is dangerous for everyone to thinking there are many for whom it's terrible and many (adults) for whom it's great.

5) I went from thinking that high volume resistance training is necessary for weight loss to thinking that in most cases it's counter-productive and that the health benefits could be had with 1 high-rep set to failure per muscle group per week.

6) I went from having no idea how some of the people I know could eat like they do and remain lean to having a fairly complete understanding of how they're dodging at least one of the bullets.

7) I went from thinking that liver is extremely disgusting to thinking that liver is disgusting.

8) I went from thinking that cramming butter into your diet at every opportunity is optimal to thinking that setting an LDL high score is probably not the best idea.

9) I went from thinking that paleo would make most people healthier automatically to thinking that though it would likely prevent the most common chronic problems, without an attention to the details, it could cause some acute problems, or even completely different chronic problems.

As with anything else, an increase in knowledge has revealed the many nuances of the subject and faded the black and white to many shades of grey. Let's hear about your progression.

C471216c9fb4fcf886b7ac84a4046b49

(1371)

on September 22, 2011
at 04:36 PM

THIS IS AWESOME! i learned just reading it lol

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on September 19, 2011
at 10:29 PM

Good question -- this is why the Paleo Diet must be a meta-rule (rule about rules).

Medium avatar

(10611)

on September 19, 2011
at 07:07 PM

Andean cultures are more tuber-dependent. A good hearty food is ajiaco, made with 3 types of potatoes. But as with other American cultures arriving from Asia this might be considered more a regressed Neo food based on farming.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on September 19, 2011
at 04:02 PM

The thing about fallback foods is that HGs eat them nearly every day. The Hadza eat 10 kinds of tubers but prefer meat over them of course (and prefer honey over anything, to be fair).

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on September 19, 2011
at 01:46 PM

not due to paleo, but while i've been paleo, i too have learned that purposefully trying to gain lean muscle weight is a much more challenging long term goal than losing an amount of body fat.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on September 19, 2011
at 01:18 PM

good start to a thread. keeping an open mind is a good practice and more difficult the more deep you feel something.

396679d1e1357eb7e9397ca34c8773ea

(454)

on September 19, 2011
at 08:10 AM

Hahahah... I love Seven it's so true. The texture not the taste!

Medium avatar

(39831)

on September 19, 2011
at 03:54 AM

It's oftentimes good to go down every path and see the lay of the land. Good exercise too.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on September 19, 2011
at 03:50 AM

Well Put Travis!

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8 Answers

4
5b69a02dadcae753771921d913909215

(1457)

on September 19, 2011
at 11:02 AM

I went from thinking my body was a broken piece of shit to thinking my body is amazing (but with some tweaking still left to do).

4
8c5533ffe71bd4262fedc7e898ead1ba

on September 19, 2011
at 10:46 AM

Mostly I've gone from thinking to feeling/sensing. My body is way smarter than my head when it comes to eating.

4
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on September 19, 2011
at 03:53 AM

My ideas change with just about every thought I have. The key is to always keep your mind open so you catch new data and incorporate it into your own understanding of human biology.

This is my rosetta stone for biology

Plus one..........

3
Medium avatar

(10611)

on September 19, 2011
at 01:40 PM

I don't eat a proscribed paleo diet. I improved my health by using GI to mark problematic carbs,then limited those foods by using carb exchange counting. As I lost weight I increased those foods when they no longer affected blood glucose.

But over time I became aware of paleo and Atkins as approaches that would have accomplished the same carb restriction. I also started to think about my immediate and ancient ancestors, and how healthy they were. I also visited Lascaux, and lost/maintained weight by walking a lot. So at this point here's where I am with living ancestrally:

  1. It's more about lifestyle than anything. Paleo life was shackled to food available in s small radius, all hand gathered. We could debate Neolithic diseases forever, but the crutches are cities, mass transportation, Whole Foods and WalMart. To the extent that I can escape these supports I become more ancestral. Walk for food.

  2. Meat is in the diet. Lascaux, spear tips and bone fragments tell me that.

  3. Paleo is proven as a diet for a young population, and ramifications for diet past age 30 are speculative at best. Thus Framingham is more trustworthy until there are decades of population studies of neo-paleo dieters.

Beyond that my interest in neo-paleoism is limited to speculation. I find some solace in support for meat eating via a vis cholesterol concerns, and see some promise for TG reduction from paleo diet.

3
1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on September 19, 2011
at 11:25 AM

I was convinced that starchy tubers were non-Paleo, on the sheer basis of "well taters are from North America, they can't be Paleo". And yet, how many species of yams developed on the African continent? Even chimps eat them, and our salivary amylase goes even further to convince me that early man ate tubers, perhaps only as a fallback food, but he still ate them. I'm not about to avoid something simply because it was on a different continent--that is stupid.

Also, the whole "too much fruit is bad for you", simply on the basis of fructose content. So many diehards assert that wild fruits are less sugary, when in fact quite a few of them are even MORE sugary than our conventional fruits. And many of those overly-sugary fruits are in Africa too.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on September 19, 2011
at 04:02 PM

The thing about fallback foods is that HGs eat them nearly every day. The Hadza eat 10 kinds of tubers but prefer meat over them of course (and prefer honey over anything, to be fair).

Medium avatar

(10611)

on September 19, 2011
at 07:07 PM

Andean cultures are more tuber-dependent. A good hearty food is ajiaco, made with 3 types of potatoes. But as with other American cultures arriving from Asia this might be considered more a regressed Neo food based on farming.

2
667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on September 19, 2011
at 01:23 PM

I share a lot of yours actually, Travis.

1) The following is not particularly paleo but it's intimately tied to eating and living in a manner that might be common in our generalized community. I think I this in something Charles Staley said but something similar lies in the movnat approach, etc. It's simply:

don't be an exerciser, be more of an athlete. exercisers are at war with their bodies and are constantly doing things to subtract, take away, from their body. Athletes are at one with their body, doing activities to use and enjoy their bodies; strengthen their bodies, etc.

The two terms "exerciser" and "athlete" obviously don't really matter. The point is the sentiment.

2) This next one is a bit general and more of a semi-answer to the ???why do you paleo??? question. The best answer to that question that???s taken me some time to come around to is:

It???s simply the easiest way to facilitate a healthy life. It???s not the only way for sure. I lived the bulk of my life eating what I would call crap and was always pretty much fine. Most of everyone around me did the same and is still doing the same and as OK as I currently am.

I believe that eating in this paleo kinda way just makes everything else easier. That???s it. So eating paleo makes whatever exercise or physical endeavor I may do easier than it otherwise would be. It makes shopping for food easier. It makes preparation of food easier. It makes weight-gain, weight-loss, or weight-maintenance easier. It makes clear-thinking and more mental activities easier.

So I think paleo just makes everything else we do, all the actually important fulfilling stuff we are on this planet to do, easier and more effective. I know folks that love and eat SAD and are big strong, healthy individuals. I simply think that they would see even better results, get more with less, etc if they chose to eat meat and potatoes rather than grain-based foods and vegetable oils.

2
93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on September 19, 2011
at 03:52 AM

Funny, you seem to be going in the exact opposite direction from me.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on September 19, 2011
at 03:54 AM

It's oftentimes good to go down every path and see the lay of the land. Good exercise too.

1
3432683fc74c2d2a40efe1e8f16ac1f6

(1130)

on September 19, 2011
at 01:44 PM

1) I went from thinking that building a lean, muscular body is 40% due to diet and 60% due to exercises, now I think it's like 80% diet and 20% exercises.

2) I thought losing weight is quite a difficult undertaking, now I consider it quite an easy task.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on September 19, 2011
at 01:46 PM

not due to paleo, but while i've been paleo, i too have learned that purposefully trying to gain lean muscle weight is a much more challenging long term goal than losing an amount of body fat.

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