3

votes

Epigenetic Switch Flipping

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 10, 2011 at 7:14 PM

Do you think it's possible to change what 'mother nature' gave you when you were born with a supplement?

I have been taking a supplement called Chaga. It's a mushroom that grows on birch trees and is full of really good stuff. It has been well studied and is shown to possess anti-tumorial, immunomodulatory, antiviral, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-complementary properties. A quick search on PubMed for 'Chaga' or 'Inonotus Obliquus' will show you the depth or research being done. I came across a new study that shows it also has anti-mutagenic properties, please read:

"Mutations in the DNA sequence of a cell???s genome lead primarily to harmful effects to individuals owing to the genetic disorder (Sawyer et al. 2007). Genetic disorder is the origin of severe genetic diseases such as sickle cell anemia, mental retardation, and Down syndrome. These mutagenic diseases occur in high morbidity in most of the developing countries (Verma 2000), resulting in a substantial reduction in the population???s quality of health. The treatment of mutagenic disorders is currently a big challenge and depends on the development of ???genetic medicine??? therapies using the transfer of DNA and /or RNA to modify gene expression to correct or compensate for an abnormal phenotype. Despite the efficacy of these technologies in treating experimental models of hereditary disorders, their successful application in the clinic still encounters many obstacles (O'Connor and Crystal 2006). Thus, antimutagenic agents have significant application in preventing mutagenic diseases. Metabolites produced by I. obliquus showed remarkable antimutagenic activity. Bioassay-guided fractionation of Chaga methanol extracts led to the isolation of two antimutagenic compounds inotodiol (2) and 3??-hydroxylanosta-8,24-diene-21-al (4). These two compounds inhibit mutations induced by mutagen MNNG by 80.0% and 77.3%, respectively, in Salmonella typhimurium TA100. They also inhibited 4NQO-induced mutagenesis in S. typhimurium TA98 and TA100 by 52.6???62.0% (Ham et al. 2009). The above example suggests that there is a potential in isolating natural compounds produced by I. obliquus in effectively reducing the incidence of mutagenic diseases. However, a thorough evaluation of antimutagenic activity of I. obliquus is necessary to further elucidate the active components and mechanisms of action."

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on January 10, 2013
at 05:23 AM

The tradition of drinking chaga tea goes back one thousand years. I don't know how to answer your question other than there are certain rules of what not to eat while taking chaga. Chaga tea is sold at the pharmacy and they say not to eat anything smoked, spicy hot (like hot peppers) or meat broth. No sausages, no other things. Also there are many many accounts of how it works for people with cancer. I have read some accounts of cancer-free villages where people had chaga tea (you have to steep it in water that is NOT scaling hot (85 t Celcius) for at least 6 hours.

Ef32d6cc543a74319464e2100e5a9ffd

(1205)

on January 09, 2013
at 10:50 PM

VB, how does it interact with something in bone broth in a negative way?

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 10, 2011
at 11:20 PM

Whoa mem - YOU are on it! This is very interesting.

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 10, 2011
at 09:32 PM

Go to Astragalus and Cat's Claw pages in the following and read the side effects section for caution re: use in autoimmune disease.http://nccam.nih.gov/health/NIH_Herbs_at_a_Glance.pdf

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 10, 2011
at 09:17 PM

+1 for Meredith : She's on it. VERY important!http://www.cmi.ustc.edu.cn/5/1/23.pdf Here's an ND who knows her stuff:http://altmedicine.about.com/od/herbsupplementguide/a/herb_mistakes.htm Scroll down to #5 and note the herbs: alfalfa, astragalus, echinacea,ginseng, licorice root and mineral zinc.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 10, 2011
at 08:58 PM

You're an ass hat Shari!

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on October 10, 2011
at 08:51 PM

I thought it was very interesting. I don't see any implication that the immune system is simple to understand here? Just some new and interesting thoughts on the matter it seems to me.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 10, 2011
at 07:45 PM

Well it certainly is more complicated than that I suppose. Since I am only a lay person who listens to podcasts, I thought this bit of information was interesting. Maybe it's nonsense, but maybe it's worth looking into?

7d0c3ea9bf8be00b93e6433d8f125ac3

(7540)

on October 10, 2011
at 07:33 PM

I'm sorry but that sounds like nonsense. If only the immune system was really so simple to understand. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autoimmunity#Pathogenesis_of_autoimmunity

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3 Answers

5
0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 10, 2011
at 07:27 PM

I don't know anything about this mushroom, but I have been catching up on my podcasts and recently I have been listening to a bunch of pods with [Dr. Datis Kharrazian][1]. He is a Thyroid guy but part of that specialty includes vast knowledge about autoimmune diseases, since Hashimoto's is one. Anywhoo, here is something I found very interesting that he had to say about how herbs and supplements can aggravate autoimmune conditions:

IN autoimmune disorders there is a TH1 or TH2 dominance. People with autoimmine tend to be dominant in either one or the other. Some cold fighting herbs like echinacea and astragalus and MUSHROOMS stimulate TH1 side and things like used like antioxidants like green tea extract simulate the TH2 side. These supps can be making an autoimmune condition worse.

So, if you have any suspicion that you have an autoimmune condition, perhaps you should pause and look further into how this mushroom may effect you negatively. If not, carry on I guess!

[1]: Book: http://www.amazon.com/Still-Thyroid-Symptoms-Tests-Normal/dp/1600376703/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1318261271&sr=8-1autoimmune condition worse.

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 10, 2011
at 09:17 PM

+1 for Meredith : She's on it. VERY important!http://www.cmi.ustc.edu.cn/5/1/23.pdf Here's an ND who knows her stuff:http://altmedicine.about.com/od/herbsupplementguide/a/herb_mistakes.htm Scroll down to #5 and note the herbs: alfalfa, astragalus, echinacea,ginseng, licorice root and mineral zinc.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 10, 2011
at 11:20 PM

Whoa mem - YOU are on it! This is very interesting.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 10, 2011
at 07:45 PM

Well it certainly is more complicated than that I suppose. Since I am only a lay person who listens to podcasts, I thought this bit of information was interesting. Maybe it's nonsense, but maybe it's worth looking into?

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on October 10, 2011
at 08:51 PM

I thought it was very interesting. I don't see any implication that the immune system is simple to understand here? Just some new and interesting thoughts on the matter it seems to me.

7d0c3ea9bf8be00b93e6433d8f125ac3

(7540)

on October 10, 2011
at 07:33 PM

I'm sorry but that sounds like nonsense. If only the immune system was really so simple to understand. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autoimmunity#Pathogenesis_of_autoimmunity

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on October 10, 2011
at 08:58 PM

You're an ass hat Shari!

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on October 10, 2011
at 09:32 PM

Go to Astragalus and Cat's Claw pages in the following and read the side effects section for caution re: use in autoimmune disease.http://nccam.nih.gov/health/NIH_Herbs_at_a_Glance.pdf

2
5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on October 10, 2011
at 08:04 PM

IMHO, the quick answer is no, the long answer is a qualified yes. You can't change the genes without some genetic engineering. BUT, you CAN change the expression of some genes with supplements, diet, exercise, etc. Doesn't seem to be what you're talking about here though.

The hard part is figuring out what you want to tweak, and all the research, expense of the supplements. :)

edit: Actually, come to think of it, there's a situation where you can account for a bad gene mutation. Namely, the gene called the MTHFR gene. A huge chunk of the US population has this mutation (to various levels), and it basically means your liver can't process toxins as efficiently as someone that doesn't have the mutation. It uses Folate in the processing, and this mutation means your body can't really use Folate efficiently (it has to convert it to Methylfolate before it can use it, and that conversion doesn't happen). So you have higher than normal Homocysteine levels because of it (leads to atherosclerosis, etc). Doesn't kill you right away, but reduces lifespan and increases damage on your body due to toxins.

You work around it by taking Methylfolate supplements (bypassing the body's conversion) which is used directly by the body and deals with the toxins. So, you can't fix the mutated gene with supplements, you aren't changing the expression of the genes, but you are working around the problem by supplementing directly the things the body needs.

0
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on January 09, 2013
at 08:18 PM

I am probably the only person here who knows about chaga.

Chaga is not a mushroom actually. It is a parasite and it grows on birch trees. It is hard as a rock. In many countries in Eastern Europe it has a cult-like quality. You can buy it at any health food market.

It is not recommended to use chaga if you eat bone broth or drink coffee.

Also, chaga tea is very popular as a medicinal drink. I have not tried it yet, but I will!

They also use Shilajit a lot. If you don't know what shilajit is - it is an ancient petrified shi(t).

Ef32d6cc543a74319464e2100e5a9ffd

(1205)

on January 09, 2013
at 10:50 PM

VB, how does it interact with something in bone broth in a negative way?

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on January 10, 2013
at 05:23 AM

The tradition of drinking chaga tea goes back one thousand years. I don't know how to answer your question other than there are certain rules of what not to eat while taking chaga. Chaga tea is sold at the pharmacy and they say not to eat anything smoked, spicy hot (like hot peppers) or meat broth. No sausages, no other things. Also there are many many accounts of how it works for people with cancer. I have read some accounts of cancer-free villages where people had chaga tea (you have to steep it in water that is NOT scaling hot (85 t Celcius) for at least 6 hours.

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