1

votes

Have I ruined my cast iron pan?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created July 21, 2013 at 4:06 PM

alt textI burned quite a bit of food on this pan, so I used baking soda to scour it off. Now it's looking pale grey and kind of sad. Is it still ok? ![alt text][2]

C6648ab69e5a1560c7585fe3ba7108fb

(880)

on July 22, 2013
at 01:56 PM

Seconding this; in the past I've used saturated fats for the seasoning process, but I'm fairly sure you need to use polyunsaturated fats for the polymerization. Backed up by the fact that my pans have never been well-seasoned until I've started cooking bacon (with its relatively higher level of PUFAs) on them regularly. My understanding is that the polymerization process seals the oil to the pan, so you don't need to worry about consuming oxidized PUFAs.

C6648ab69e5a1560c7585fe3ba7108fb

(880)

on July 22, 2013
at 01:55 PM

Seconding this; in the past I've used saturated fats for the seasoning process, but I'm fairly sure you need to use polyunsaturated fats for the polymerization. Backed up by the fact that my pans have never been well-seasoned until I've started cooking bacon (with it's relatively higher level of PUFAs) on them regularly. My understanding is that the polymerization process seals the oil to the pan, so you don't need to worry about consuming oxidized PUFAs.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on July 22, 2013
at 03:43 AM

And report back!

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on July 21, 2013
at 06:23 PM

Looks fine, looks clean. :)

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6 Answers

4
197651282ddd8d675b974ee811d2269e

on July 21, 2013
at 04:13 PM

It's fine, just re-season it by applying plenty of oil or lard and putting it into a cool-ish oven ~200 degrees for a few hours or overnight. Then wipe away excess oil with a paper towel and it's good as new.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on July 22, 2013
at 03:43 AM

And report back!

3
2abc7edf08d56505e360c1912008a0f5

on July 21, 2013
at 10:02 PM

The basic idea is this: Smear a food-grade drying oil onto a cast iron pan, and then bake it above the oil???s smoke point. This will initiate the release of free radicals and polymerization. The more drying the oil, the harder the polymer. So start with the right oil. Flax Seed Oil is one of the best, if not the best, options.

C6648ab69e5a1560c7585fe3ba7108fb

(880)

on July 22, 2013
at 01:55 PM

Seconding this; in the past I've used saturated fats for the seasoning process, but I'm fairly sure you need to use polyunsaturated fats for the polymerization. Backed up by the fact that my pans have never been well-seasoned until I've started cooking bacon (with it's relatively higher level of PUFAs) on them regularly. My understanding is that the polymerization process seals the oil to the pan, so you don't need to worry about consuming oxidized PUFAs.

C6648ab69e5a1560c7585fe3ba7108fb

(880)

on July 22, 2013
at 01:56 PM

Seconding this; in the past I've used saturated fats for the seasoning process, but I'm fairly sure you need to use polyunsaturated fats for the polymerization. Backed up by the fact that my pans have never been well-seasoned until I've started cooking bacon (with its relatively higher level of PUFAs) on them regularly. My understanding is that the polymerization process seals the oil to the pan, so you don't need to worry about consuming oxidized PUFAs.

2
7fb5e7849c5d9d8ebdfa9d36786b1fe9

(178)

on July 21, 2013
at 06:30 PM

You could try cooking it in your oven on the cleaning setting before reseasoning it. Cast iron stuff is largely indestructible in my experience and cooking them at a really high temp is basically their "reset to manufacturer defaults" button.

2
Cbda678b2a6bf0537d8c4ea0ce8aa9ad

(4319)

on July 21, 2013
at 04:47 PM

Just re-season it. Google it and read the various instructions that are given. Choose one that suits you and sounds the most coherent

1
C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

on July 22, 2013
at 03:19 AM

Unless rust has eaten the thing through, the answer is always no. Because you can always do a new cure, it's pretty much impossible to "ruin" cast iron. Everyone else in this thread has great advice on how to do that.

1
B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

on July 22, 2013
at 02:00 AM

Give it a good reseasoning with whatever sat-fat you like best... Many versions of the instruction across the internet.

http://paleohacks.com/questions/5031/how-to-season-maintain-a-cast-iron-skillet

is great!

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