2

votes

What are your favorite paleo-safe vegetables?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created November 04, 2011 at 7:09 PM

I tend to eat certain vegetables more than all others. Unfortunately, they happen to be mostly nightshades (tomatoes, chiles, and potatoes) and things that can cause digestive issues (onions, garlic, shallots). Add to that corn and beans in the summer, and starchy squash in the winter, and I'm thinking that I should diversify my vegetable selection a little. PHers who avoid nightshades and other problematic vegetables, what are your most versatile kitchen staples in the vegetable realm?

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

Okay, I recognize it as "Chinese cabbage" and I do like it. thanks for the reminder!

7c5b64bdf359e7cdcb0ee15629abdaa9

(50)

on November 25, 2011
at 01:26 PM

Bah, me too Kelly :( It sux when sometimes all I ask is to be able to enjoy some vegies like everyone else...hell, even just some fresh parsley or cilantro or mint with my meat...ooh just a wee bit of garlic or chili...please?...sigh. But, hey, it's getting easier at least to not feel so deprived. The body and mind adapt, eventually, lol!

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on November 16, 2011
at 08:43 PM

I have heard other people recently talking about kabocha. Never tried it but I'm definitely interested.

673f7ad6052448d51496f177395416b7

(344)

on November 16, 2011
at 08:37 PM

also known as kabocha squash. Looks most similar to the acorn squash, but the taste and texture is more akin to that of a sweet potato- sweeter and denser than a regular pumpkin. great as a sweet or savory dish, very versatile.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on November 16, 2011
at 07:49 PM

Japanese pumpkin? Interesting. Does it look like a pumpkin?

673f7ad6052448d51496f177395416b7

(344)

on November 16, 2011
at 07:18 PM

Great suggestion, although I sometimes do worry about pesticide content and quality issues. (not that there ARE issues but that I have no idea either way).

Medium avatar

(2301)

on November 05, 2011
at 06:33 AM

There is no reason to live without kale.

Cf32992bfa1907147c7cdc451bba9c63

(2890)

on November 05, 2011
at 03:12 AM

This is how I feel about a lot of the advice here. So what if my marinara sauce has 2 grams added evaporated cane syrup... Let's not forget the big picture.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on November 05, 2011
at 01:46 AM

I made myself hungry and ate a bowl of roasted butternut squash with a teeny bit of butter that I melted and added sage to. And of COURSE I ate it all with a spoon. Best food to mouth vehicle besides bacon.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on November 05, 2011
at 01:45 AM

I made myself hungry and ate a bowl of roasted butternut squash with a teeny bit of butter than I melted and added sage to.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 05, 2011
at 01:25 AM

Stop! You're making me hungry!

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on November 05, 2011
at 01:18 AM

Paleo-safe? Kale (and other cruciferous vegetables) are potentially goitrogenic.

2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a

(4994)

on November 04, 2011
at 11:16 PM

YES!! I LOVE this time of year for root veg! I often shred raw carrot, raw beetroot and mix them with olive oil and blalsamic vinegar, heavenly.

Df45ff15a3b093b7f22f0fec5ae1237a

(260)

on November 04, 2011
at 10:51 PM

Delicata baked with chipotle until golden crispy, then tossed in lime juice, olive oil and salt and pepper. Truly amazing.

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on November 04, 2011
at 09:06 PM

Onions hurt but they're much worse when raw. Cooked to hell aren't too bad. Garlic, though, is definitely bad for my inner workings.

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on November 04, 2011
at 09:03 PM

I braised a napa cabbage in bone broth last week. Mmmmmm...

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 04, 2011
at 09:03 PM

I'll have to check into that and try it if it's available near me (NV.)

D0501f0cc09c961a06c3d188361e7b07

on November 04, 2011
at 08:45 PM

Delicata with tumeric and black pepper. Bake in strips and you've got mini "fries"

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on November 04, 2011
at 08:13 PM

yes even the mushy carrots boiled to the point of disintegration. As for summer squash, I live overseas so types/variety are limited..butternut is the main one I find. At first all things are ok, but doesn't last more than a few tries. Food hates me in general lately!

742ff8ba4ff55e84593ede14ac1c3cab

(3536)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:55 PM

I grew a lot of butternut and acorn squash. Looks like I am going to survive through the winter just fine.

742ff8ba4ff55e84593ede14ac1c3cab

(3536)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:53 PM

I loved onions but they were the main cause of my digestive distress.

Medium avatar

(2301)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:48 PM

With cremini mushrooms. Thank god for cremini mushrooms.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:38 PM

That's just wrong! You should get to enjoy the pleasures with the rest of us. How about the yellow summer squash? It seems so mild and innocent it's hard to believe it would attack you. :-))

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:37 PM

Does that include vegetables that have been cooked within an inch of death? My beloved sister can't handle broccoli unless it's been practically reduced to mush.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:37 PM

Dave, don't tell anybody but I do inhale me some fordhooks once in a while. It's worth it and actually I'm not aware of any post-meal symptoms unlike wheat.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:31 PM

And "What is okay" varies from person to person. Paleo is a template - not dogma.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:30 PM

Beans are low (#11 out of 12) on the list of things that Dr. Harris says to eliminate. Also, in the Jaminet's PHD book they say all beans/legumes are bad, but the only evidence they present is against soy, peanuts and kidney beans. I say if you like them and they don't cause any noticible problems, have them from time to time! Life is to be enjoyed after all!

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:21 PM

I like yellow summer squash, but you can have the others, M!

Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

14 Answers

best answer

7
E1335327d7564732a3c78a18b45644a8

(110)

on November 04, 2011
at 08:45 PM

Anything chopped into bite-size chunks, tossed in fat and roasted @ 400 till it's got some black:

  • Brussels sprouts (20 min)
  • Ripped-up kale (5-10 min)
  • Broccoli (10 min)
  • Cauliflower (10 min)
  • Cubed squash (20 min)

Heap it onto a hot plate, throw a steak on top and beat your chest.

Then eat it.

6
Medium avatar

(2301)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:48 PM

kale. so much kale. every day.

Medium avatar

(2301)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:48 PM

With cremini mushrooms. Thank god for cremini mushrooms.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on November 05, 2011
at 01:18 AM

Paleo-safe? Kale (and other cruciferous vegetables) are potentially goitrogenic.

Medium avatar

(2301)

on November 05, 2011
at 06:33 AM

There is no reason to live without kale.

5
3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:50 PM

You can have my noodles, but you try to eliminate the things that go in my marinara sauce then i'm getting off this paleo wagon.

Cf32992bfa1907147c7cdc451bba9c63

(2890)

on November 05, 2011
at 03:12 AM

This is how I feel about a lot of the advice here. So what if my marinara sauce has 2 grams added evaporated cane syrup... Let's not forget the big picture.

4
Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on November 05, 2011
at 12:32 AM

I'm an equal opportunity vegetable lover, I eat them all including nightshades - sorry!

Roasting is my ideal way as the veg get tender but I have control on exactly how I want them to turn out - either firm or tender but with that nice finish that an oven gives. Curried cauliflower. Kale: chips, braised, raw as a salad with lemon vinaigrette. Thinly sliced sweet potato roasted so a bit crispy on the edges but tender in the middle. Tiny potatoes rubbed in fat and sprinkled with coarse salt then roasted. Squash: smashed, roasted, steamed - all varieties. Kabocha is hands down a favourite, you can eat the skin! Stuffed zucchini. Roasted carrots finished with a little lemon juice and some fresh herbs are like candy. Shredded brussel sprouts - roasted or eaten raw with a dressing. Beets! Oh beets.. grated raw, roasted, steamed. Oo! Turnips and parsnips!

I go to two-three farmers markets a week, always Monday for my tuber guy, Saturday for fruit, Sunday for veggie-rama. There's a certain veg stand I frequent, organic/pesticide free, and if I miss their Sunday stand Monday is when I load up - they are parked near my tuber dude. Trader Joe's is my fill-in spot as they just started getting in some good organic fall veggies.

Always a staple: tubers, kale, squash, carrots, beets, and then each week one or two others.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on November 05, 2011
at 01:46 AM

I made myself hungry and ate a bowl of roasted butternut squash with a teeny bit of butter that I melted and added sage to. And of COURSE I ate it all with a spoon. Best food to mouth vehicle besides bacon.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on November 05, 2011
at 01:45 AM

I made myself hungry and ate a bowl of roasted butternut squash with a teeny bit of butter than I melted and added sage to.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 05, 2011
at 01:25 AM

Stop! You're making me hungry!

2
673f7ad6052448d51496f177395416b7

on November 16, 2011
at 07:14 PM

I've been eating 1-2 lbs of japanese pumpkin daily for the past 2 weeks, a bit addicted. I'm actually quite surprised that my body has taken to it so well since 80g worth of starchy carbs is double what my body can usually handle without experiencing some sort of carb overload reaction (increased hunger, bloating, lethargy). I add pastured cream to the soup, which maybe blunts the carb load. I also eat much of the skin (even though it's not organic) because it tastes amazing and adds fiber.

Anyway, love the stuff and hope there isn't anything detrimental in it that I've been consuming too much of as I don't expect I'll be easing up for as long as they're in season. May have to stop eating so much of the skin though.

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on November 16, 2011
at 08:43 PM

I have heard other people recently talking about kabocha. Never tried it but I'm definitely interested.

673f7ad6052448d51496f177395416b7

(344)

on November 16, 2011
at 08:37 PM

also known as kabocha squash. Looks most similar to the acorn squash, but the taste and texture is more akin to that of a sweet potato- sweeter and denser than a regular pumpkin. great as a sweet or savory dish, very versatile.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on November 16, 2011
at 07:49 PM

Japanese pumpkin? Interesting. Does it look like a pumpkin?

2
7cbdd4e8eedba06368d4766e6c0ef015

(320)

on November 06, 2011
at 03:37 AM

If there's a good-sized Asian community near you, check out some Thai, Vietnames or Chinese markets. Excellent vegetables from the Asian farmer's market in our area. Gai-lan, red spinach plus other varieties of spinach. Also watercress, rapini, and turnip, rutabaga, radish and beet tops.

673f7ad6052448d51496f177395416b7

(344)

on November 16, 2011
at 07:18 PM

Great suggestion, although I sometimes do worry about pesticide content and quality issues. (not that there ARE issues but that I have no idea either way).

2
Medium avatar

(12379)

on November 04, 2011
at 09:51 PM

Turnips, beets, radishes. I am loving the underground bunch lately! I just made a wonderful japanese pickle out of some watermelon radishes that I just got in my weekly veggie delivery. The pickle was easy - rice vinegar, salt and water poured over thinly sliced radishes = delish! Even the little guy loves them!

And I agree with the Kale, collard greens and chard - super delish. I have been pan-frying lightly in butter and then adding some miso - just awesome!

2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a

(4994)

on November 04, 2011
at 11:16 PM

YES!! I LOVE this time of year for root veg! I often shred raw carrot, raw beetroot and mix them with olive oil and blalsamic vinegar, heavenly.

2
6b365c14c646462210f3ef6b6fecace1

(1784)

on November 04, 2011
at 08:59 PM

I have a thing for napa cabbage - slight peppery taste and it compliments all sorts of meat dishes really really well :-)

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on November 04, 2011
at 09:03 PM

I braised a napa cabbage in bone broth last week. Mmmmmm...

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

Okay, I recognize it as "Chinese cabbage" and I do like it. thanks for the reminder!

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 04, 2011
at 09:03 PM

I'll have to check into that and try it if it's available near me (NV.)

2
345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:34 PM

Actually I love all vegetables but vegetables don't like me!! I've tried them all, I can eat them for a little bit and then I can't. I'm pretty much down to potatoes and asparagus and I'm pretty bored. I literally crave brussel sprouts, broccoli and cauliflower but my system cannot handle them. I can eat a bit or two tops. Love pumpkin, and cooked carrots they do not like me!!

Nightshades, green-shades, yellow shades doesn't matter (lol....see what I did!)

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:38 PM

That's just wrong! You should get to enjoy the pleasures with the rest of us. How about the yellow summer squash? It seems so mild and innocent it's hard to believe it would attack you. :-))

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on November 04, 2011
at 08:13 PM

yes even the mushy carrots boiled to the point of disintegration. As for summer squash, I live overseas so types/variety are limited..butternut is the main one I find. At first all things are ok, but doesn't last more than a few tries. Food hates me in general lately!

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:37 PM

Does that include vegetables that have been cooked within an inch of death? My beloved sister can't handle broccoli unless it's been practically reduced to mush.

7c5b64bdf359e7cdcb0ee15629abdaa9

(50)

on November 25, 2011
at 01:26 PM

Bah, me too Kelly :( It sux when sometimes all I ask is to be able to enjoy some vegies like everyone else...hell, even just some fresh parsley or cilantro or mint with my meat...ooh just a wee bit of garlic or chili...please?...sigh. But, hey, it's getting easier at least to not feel so deprived. The body and mind adapt, eventually, lol!

2
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on November 04, 2011
at 07:19 PM

Squash and different types of squash. I have a kabotcha, an acorn, and a butternut squash in my kitchen right now. Carrots are another favorite. I usually have lots of salads with lettuce too.

I don't think it's nightshades that bother me. I think cooking and pureeing things makes most vegetables OK for me. Corns and beans are generally not considered paleo and give a lot of people digestive issues.

I have to wonder if this question would be better phrased as "what are you favorite easy to digest vegetables?"

Df45ff15a3b093b7f22f0fec5ae1237a

(260)

on November 04, 2011
at 10:51 PM

Delicata baked with chipotle until golden crispy, then tossed in lime juice, olive oil and salt and pepper. Truly amazing.

D0501f0cc09c961a06c3d188361e7b07

on November 04, 2011
at 08:45 PM

Delicata with tumeric and black pepper. Bake in strips and you've got mini "fries"

742ff8ba4ff55e84593ede14ac1c3cab

(3536)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:55 PM

I grew a lot of butternut and acorn squash. Looks like I am going to survive through the winter just fine.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:21 PM

I like yellow summer squash, but you can have the others, M!

1
0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

on November 04, 2011
at 08:12 PM

Kale, pumpkin, celery and celery root, broccoli, spinach, asparagus, beet and mustard greens, collards, lettuce, parsnips, raw carrots. I avoid eggplant but do okay with tomatoes, onions, hot peppers, shallots, garlic and the occasional white or sweet potato.

1
9d8b1ca66aba8d9fa784689c222615c6

on November 04, 2011
at 07:42 PM

I follow the low-carb vegetable suggestions and I thrive on swiss chard, spinach, lettuces, asparagus, broccoli, kales and collard greens. I can grow most of these year-round. Occasionally I have some Garnet yam. I also take E3-Live algae.

1
A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:26 PM

Pretty much all we eat at our house is broccoli. Boring, but the kids like it.

I like spinach, bok choi and asparagas - but we don't get much of that. Sometimes we eat green beans - which I'm not that fond of (neither are the kids).

1
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:25 PM

I just don't get tired of good dark leaf lettuce, celery, cukes or green onions. I also love asparagus, broccoli, celery root and an occasional sweet potato. I enjoy beets a lot if the timing's right and fresh brussel sprouts. And all cooking starts with onions, right?

I'm neutral with green beans, carrots, and most other primal/paleo-approved veggies.

PLEASE: I'd like us to pass a referendum that fordhook lima beans are okay--my FAVORITES--and I just about needed counselling when I saw they weren't primal. :-))

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:30 PM

Beans are low (#11 out of 12) on the list of things that Dr. Harris says to eliminate. Also, in the Jaminet's PHD book they say all beans/legumes are bad, but the only evidence they present is against soy, peanuts and kidney beans. I say if you like them and they don't cause any noticible problems, have them from time to time! Life is to be enjoyed after all!

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:31 PM

And "What is okay" varies from person to person. Paleo is a template - not dogma.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 04, 2011
at 07:37 PM

Dave, don't tell anybody but I do inhale me some fordhooks once in a while. It's worth it and actually I'm not aware of any post-meal symptoms unlike wheat.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!