2

votes

Sweet potatoes, too much vitamin A?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created December 22, 2012 at 2:06 PM

Hi guys,

I follow the auto-immune protocol for the Paleo diet and it's been amazing and I feel great! : )

Since starting this diet I've lost a shed load of weight, about 15 kilos in 4 months. Before I was totally ripped so all this weight was muscle and I want it back but obviously I have to stick to my Paleo diet. The only way I've found of putting weight on is by eating ''safe starches'' in this case sweet potatoes.

I am concerned that eating sweet potatoes, 3 a day is the minimum I need to eat to put on weight, will provide far too much of the RDA of vitamin A. I think it's something like 1000%. I have read that there is no problem from eating vitamin A from plant sources but that sounds like a lot, is it really OK to do this everyday?

I can only eat 1 fruit a day and well steamed vegetables, so getting carbs from theses sources is possible put impractical.

I'd be prepared to eat more fat if that would work but what kind and how much

Thanks a lot

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on May 31, 2013
at 05:57 PM

The sample sizes on the studies Kresser uses to make his claims are tiny, no way large enough to justify prevalance of inability to convert BC to VA.

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on December 22, 2012
at 08:46 PM

It's extremely difficult to kill yourself with Vitamin A unless you're eating carnivore liver or supplementing with synthetic vitamin A. I've eaten at least a dozen calf livers in the form of pate in a day.

F823371a5c530abf36eab29b7ce3ee2a

(50)

on December 22, 2012
at 05:48 PM

Thanks guys, that's awesome. I'll get stuck in! : )

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on December 22, 2012
at 02:46 PM

Right. and there's no way to really get to "too much vitamin A" from plant foods, because all an excess does is turn your skin orange, but other than that there are no ill effects... in contrast to eating polar bear liver.

  • F823371a5c530abf36eab29b7ce3ee2a

    asked by

    (50)
  • Views
    4.5K
  • Last Activity
    1258D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

3 Answers

6
Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on December 22, 2012
at 02:36 PM

It's not an issue. You could eat 3 sweet potatoes a day and be deficient in Vitamin A if you fall into the substantial group of people who can't make the conversion.

Beta-carotene is the precursor (inactive form) of retinol, the active form of vitamin A. While beta-carotene is converted into vitamin A in humans, only 3% gets converted in a healthy adult. And that???s assuming you???re not one of the 45% of adults that don???t convert any beta-carotene into vitamin A at all.

F823371a5c530abf36eab29b7ce3ee2a

(50)

on December 22, 2012
at 05:48 PM

Thanks guys, that's awesome. I'll get stuck in! : )

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on December 22, 2012
at 02:46 PM

Right. and there's no way to really get to "too much vitamin A" from plant foods, because all an excess does is turn your skin orange, but other than that there are no ill effects... in contrast to eating polar bear liver.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on May 31, 2013
at 05:57 PM

The sample sizes on the studies Kresser uses to make his claims are tiny, no way large enough to justify prevalance of inability to convert BC to VA.

0
67871ef2326f29da48f1522827fc0f80

(704)

on May 31, 2013
at 04:30 PM

How are you on fats? I have autoimmune, too.

I find it EASY to cook everything in coconut oil and drizzle cooked veg with EVOO. That may help, working on turning your body into burning fat rather than carbs.

0
649149945245b42bca9381a26ac3d67b

on May 31, 2013
at 03:08 PM

"Beta-carotene is the precursor (inactive form) of retinol, the active form of vitamin A. While beta-carotene is converted into vitamin A in humans, only 3% gets converted in a healthy adult. And that’s assuming you’re not one of the 45% of adults that don’t convert any beta-carotene into vitamin A at all."

Well, if you are not converting more than 3%, where does the remaining 97% end up? Could it be competing for storage with other important nutrients? Presumably, as time passes, your body will need to track the total not yet converted and keep it all under control? Any possibility that all the unused beta-carotene hanging around in your system could degrade? Can circumstances develop which could trigger an abnormal level of conversion?

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!