8

votes

prolactin surge and eating carbs

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 31, 2011 at 5:31 PM

I still don't understand the significance of the prolactin surge (especially in older people).. what happens if you eat carbs within 4 hours of going to sleep? What is LR? I am neither a neurosurgeon, nor a scientist, nor a physician ??? is there any way to explain it in less technical terms.. thank you very much.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 03, 2012
at 07:11 PM

I'd like to know this too!

2a31d374874fd935ad813a7960ce81ea

(0)

on July 22, 2012
at 05:35 PM

Can you give those of us new to this page a link to "MDA and the 198 page thread, please?

Medium avatar

(2169)

on October 26, 2011
at 02:44 AM

Thanks for explaining this. I had to read it a couple of times, but it makes sense. The frustrating thing is that my dad (who is probably leptin resistant) and my boyfriend's mother (who has sleep apnea and trouble loosing weight) won't listen to anything. They refuse to change their beliefs and "ways." So frustrating that they constantly complain about their problems (poor sleep, weight problems etc) but refuse to make any changes to correct them.

Medium avatar

(2169)

on October 26, 2011
at 02:35 AM

so lower carb at dinner will help?

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on August 01, 2011
at 01:17 AM

rhythms adapt as the sun changes.....and so does pituitary secretion. Your diet should too. Interestingly exercise is more efficient in cold temps because you activate both UCP1 and 3 if your LS and thyroid is working well.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on July 31, 2011
at 11:59 PM

Not really.......

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 31, 2011
at 10:07 PM

should it be believed that clear and vivid dreams are a sign of HG secretion?

24c92b72905f431ff824805ae3298e38

(40)

on July 31, 2011
at 09:24 PM

From the "evolution" point of view - wouldn't it optimal to go to bed and wake up based on the sunrise and sunset (vs. specific times)? sunrise/sunset happens at different times in wintegrr vs. summer.. Also, depending on the geography the availability of carbs is reduced during winter time - should we adjust the diet depending on the time of year (but that's a differnt discussion).. thanks..

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on July 31, 2011
at 08:31 PM

correct....the earlier you eat the better.....it allows for more sleep. This is what has changed about me over five yrs. I eat now by 7 and in bed by 10.....i sleep and wake up with no alarm clock at 5:30 to 6 and I go to my hot tub and watch the sunrise. I think of 3 things to make my self better and post the best thought to my FB wall for all my friends to read. They seem addicted to my routine now but its all based upon optimal leptin functioning.

B525b3e4b1d6f1cdceec943cdec6eb7d

(1680)

on July 31, 2011
at 07:28 PM

The Quilt - You said "Leptin levels rise slowly for fours post dinner. At midnight leptin then enters the hypothalamus" So this is assuming that the last thing the subject ate before bed was at 8pm? – redberry 0 secs ago

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on July 31, 2011
at 07:27 PM

LR = Leptin resistance. if you really want to read.....go over to MDA and their is a 198 page thread on the nuanaces.

B525b3e4b1d6f1cdceec943cdec6eb7d

(1680)

on July 31, 2011
at 07:27 PM

>Leptin levels rise slowly for fours post dinner. At midnight leptin then enters the hypothalamus So this is assuming that the last thing the subject ate before bed was at 8pm?

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on July 31, 2011
at 06:37 PM

sorry it had to be technical......but it is spot on on the biochemistry and hormonal modulation. Id you rather know why and why not.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on July 31, 2011
at 06:34 PM

plus one........

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4 Answers

4
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on July 31, 2011
at 06:29 PM

its huge......first step is Leptin levels rise slowly for fours post dinner. At midnight leptin then enters the hypothalamus. Once it binds to the receptor two things occur. The first is a second messenger is sent to the thyroid to up regulate T3 production to stimulate Uncoupling protein 3 in muscles to burn fat liberated as we sleep at a higher metabolic rate. These fats are burned not as energy but as free heat. It requires Leptin sensitivity and proper thyroid function at the muscle level.

The second effect is via another second messenger......the coupled receptor with leptin bound sends a message to the anterior pituitary to release prolactin from 12-2 AM......the prolactin release is required for proper control of sleep stages and yoking sleep and metabolism.....but the real benefit is this is the signal the hypothalamus uses to release puslitile Growth Hormone release from 2 AM to 5 AM during sleep stages 2-4. This allows the process of AUTOPHAGY to be of maximal efficiency as we sleep.

Recall that autophagy is the process of cellualr renewal. When we recycle proteins, learn, and retool our brains from yesterdays oxidative damage.

People who have sleep apnea.....are generally obese, Leptin resistant and never get their pulsatile GH release and as a result autophagy is poor in them......they suffer more diseases and age faster because their sleep is uncoupled from their metabolism.

Moreover they can never burn their excess calories as pure heat because the initial message was blocked........so they remain fat. They cant lose the weight either until they become leptin sensitive. When they do they notice a tremendous change in sleep........sleep is designed to be resotrative.

Prolactin is the trigger for GH release. GH decreases abdominal fat and increase your lean muscle mass and allows for major protein synthesis. Its levels fall off a cliff for most women after age 40 and for men after age fifty and there is a corresponding drop in the efficiency of sleep and autophagy. This is why older people sleep less than younger people. It is also why babies sleep so long.......this is when their GH is being released when everything is working optimally.

I hope this helps.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on August 01, 2011
at 01:17 AM

rhythms adapt as the sun changes.....and so does pituitary secretion. Your diet should too. Interestingly exercise is more efficient in cold temps because you activate both UCP1 and 3 if your LS and thyroid is working well.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on July 31, 2011
at 08:31 PM

correct....the earlier you eat the better.....it allows for more sleep. This is what has changed about me over five yrs. I eat now by 7 and in bed by 10.....i sleep and wake up with no alarm clock at 5:30 to 6 and I go to my hot tub and watch the sunrise. I think of 3 things to make my self better and post the best thought to my FB wall for all my friends to read. They seem addicted to my routine now but its all based upon optimal leptin functioning.

B525b3e4b1d6f1cdceec943cdec6eb7d

(1680)

on July 31, 2011
at 07:27 PM

>Leptin levels rise slowly for fours post dinner. At midnight leptin then enters the hypothalamus So this is assuming that the last thing the subject ate before bed was at 8pm?

B525b3e4b1d6f1cdceec943cdec6eb7d

(1680)

on July 31, 2011
at 07:28 PM

The Quilt - You said "Leptin levels rise slowly for fours post dinner. At midnight leptin then enters the hypothalamus" So this is assuming that the last thing the subject ate before bed was at 8pm? – redberry 0 secs ago

24c92b72905f431ff824805ae3298e38

(40)

on July 31, 2011
at 09:24 PM

From the "evolution" point of view - wouldn't it optimal to go to bed and wake up based on the sunrise and sunset (vs. specific times)? sunrise/sunset happens at different times in wintegrr vs. summer.. Also, depending on the geography the availability of carbs is reduced during winter time - should we adjust the diet depending on the time of year (but that's a differnt discussion).. thanks..

Medium avatar

(2169)

on October 26, 2011
at 02:44 AM

Thanks for explaining this. I had to read it a couple of times, but it makes sense. The frustrating thing is that my dad (who is probably leptin resistant) and my boyfriend's mother (who has sleep apnea and trouble loosing weight) won't listen to anything. They refuse to change their beliefs and "ways." So frustrating that they constantly complain about their problems (poor sleep, weight problems etc) but refuse to make any changes to correct them.

3
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on July 31, 2011
at 06:34 PM

Forgot this one fact.......the more carbs you eat the more likely you will blow your prolactin surge. IE you will lose it. Prolactin is tied to carb intake by the actions of NPY. People who are leptin resistant have high levels of NPY. For prolactin to work best you need lower levels of NPY in the hypothalamus. So a reasonable carb intake must be done.

Reasonable depends upon the context. If you are very fit and ripped you can handle a higher carb load and still maintain low NPY levels.

Most americans cant do this because of the SAD. The chronic over eating of carbs has completely trashed their HPA axis so they need to eat a VLC paleo diet to get it all working correctly.

Good Luck

Medium avatar

(2169)

on October 26, 2011
at 02:35 AM

so lower carb at dinner will help?

1
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on July 31, 2011
at 08:36 PM

Regarding the prolactin surge and sleep EEG's...... around 90 minutes into the sleep cycle, dramatic events occur at the hypocretin neurons with the secretion of Prolactin. In terms of large-scale oscillations-and the large, slow waves over the entire brain are not going to be found. What we find are high-frequency, small-amplitude activity prevails, with greatly reduced correlation to normal sleep cycles. This phase is referred to as the "desynchronized state." In this phase, our eyes move rapidly back and forth and called "rapid eye movement" (REM) sleep. Most of our dreams happen during REM sleep and GH secretion is there too. 25% of sleep is spent in REM in healthy humans. Sleep apnea folks never get a wink of it. However, REM sleep occurs over approximately four or five cycles throughout the night, with each cycle being slightly longer than the previous one. Slow wave oscillation and memory consolidation happens in REM and this is where things are burned into our memories.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on July 31, 2011
at 11:59 PM

Not really.......

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 31, 2011
at 10:07 PM

should it be believed that clear and vivid dreams are a sign of HG secretion?

0
28f280f8d64c7207fd94d158fbe6e070

(218)

on July 22, 2012
at 05:40 AM

How does this prolactin cycle work or not work for someone who has over 200 of prolactin in her bloodstream at all times? (prolactinoma)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 03, 2012
at 07:11 PM

I'd like to know this too!

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