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Overeating and carbs at night

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 19, 2012 at 11:48 PM

I've been eating paleo-ish for about 18 months. At times I am very hardcore and others I tend to cheat. My goal is to stay on a strict paleo diet for at least 30 days, then reintroduce foods. However, nights are my downfall. I usually eat a healthy breakfast and lunch (eggs, meat, veggies, water), but by 7:00PM I am famished and tend to overindulge (eating before dinner, eating two full plates of dinner, then eating dessert). After I overeat, the guilt sets in. What can I do to improve? My job is stressful (finance/law), so part of me thinks that my willpower is zero by dinner. But that's just an excuse. How can I power through the evening and stay paleo?

E45c5a1c8df73da5e03bb6e7e90f8420

(644)

on September 20, 2012
at 01:48 AM

Mood Cure is a great book-it's 5-HTP or L-tryptophan to help increase serotonin- L-tryptophan also converts to melatonin so aids in sleep and dreaming...

C3bc92e6b5eba45dc55f43ac3c70cc25

on September 20, 2012
at 01:47 AM

You might want to look up some carb backloading articles. Might work for you

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11 Answers

1
05de181d71c1df6304a03566fe821d4b

on September 20, 2012
at 01:02 AM

I'd look into a ketogenic paleo for a bit get yourself off that glucose dependency, Carbohydrates can break down into exorphins, morphine like substances, so when you are stress carbs comfort you. So you'll basically be doing a sugar detox and break your dependency on sugar, and learn other ways to cope with stress. The rest of your calories will be coming from fat instead of carbs. Maybe add more good cholesterol (pastured eggs, duck eggs, liver) can help with mood (some mood, anxiety stuff can be linked to low serum cholesterol in the blood as well). I also think this would be good because you won't be consuming enough carbs to cause blood sugar dysregulation, which also leads to hormone imbalance. so by minimizing these sugar spikes will also help tremendously. After a few days your cravings for carbs will diminish. You're only source of carbs will be mainly from above ground fibrous vegetables, or avocado.

Supplement with Tryptophan, L-Glutamin, and maybe Gymnema sylvestre to help with the craving

0
6eb70b9d6f13fbe1d318857ee29f6332

on September 20, 2012
at 02:17 PM

a square of >70% dark chocolate brings down the curtain for my eating each night...1 square only. I agree with the thoughts on getting enough fat, and going ketogenic. Cravings are just addictions...

0
Cfb06f83909be33e24fbd7b7e61ef3b4

on September 20, 2012
at 01:13 PM

Are you getting enough fat in, drinking enough water, getting enough sleep? I was having similar issues, and found that increasing my fat intake to about 65% increased my energy levels and left me satiated throughout the day so I wasn't picking here or there & looking for something to snack on at night. I also started drinking more water all day long, which helped with the hunger and also fatigue. I found I was overdoing it with caffeine to get through the day, which decreased my sleep quality and also contributed to being famished at night after the effects of the caffeine wore off.

0
7a6398de07fa9d680f9024fd14cc320c

on September 20, 2012
at 11:21 AM

Firstly, don't beat yourself up about it, that's not healthy. What you need is a simple plan of attack to beat the craving (easy for me to sound enthusiastic, I've just started!) but this is where I struggle too!

Make sure you have quick, easy, grabbable snacks around wether something you've whisked up a batch of or some carrot sticks or nuts, just something to munch to keep your mouth and stomach occupied.

I've also read that eating a small started before you eat makes you feel more full as the grehlin(?) hormones kick in which tell you to feel full but take 20 minutes before your body (and belly) registers that sensation.

I've also hear that something sweet after your meal leaves you feeling satisfied too. Just a thought.

Good luck and please banish all feelings of guilt as they are not healthy!

0
26e2364f7966432bbf8acfe930583674

(460)

on September 20, 2012
at 07:29 AM

Is the guilt and whatnot because (1) you are eating crap or because (2) you are eating carbs? Crap will hurt you. Carbs will not (depending on context).

In case #1, get the crap out of your house. Problem solved.

In case #2, it's ok. Provided you are eating as you describe (eggs, meat, veggies, water), and assuming that you do some sort of exercise, it sounds like you're carb backloading - which in my experience works quite nicely. And, if you are not exercising, it's still not the end of the world.

If you're still feeling good (excepting the guilt part, depending upon its basis), there are no hard and fast rules - there is only what works for you. Be guided by how you feel, by how you look, and by what your biomarkers say, not by some idea you got here or there.

0
7e36094a0f7a2fbad24290225405220b

(2064)

on September 20, 2012
at 07:00 AM

What are you having for dessert? I find some fruit and/or sweeteners can give me an insulin surge followed by a drop that makes me hungry again before bed. I'm better without dessert.

0
Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

on September 20, 2012
at 05:10 AM

Maybe your 'healthy breakfast and lunch' might suit you better if you included more carbs in those meals (ie starch or fruit). Given you overindulge in carbs at night, perhaps not resitrcting them throughout the day might be worth a try.

Also if the meat you have in breakfast and lunch is on the leaner side, it might be possible that your body wants other macronutients? Just a thought.

0
0d7be15fd1a76c7a713b0e2e75381e75

(307)

on September 20, 2012
at 02:30 AM

Do you eat in between breakfast and 7:00? Eat a good lunch, whenever you get hungry in the afternoon. If you do this I don't see how you could legitimately be hungry at 7. If you are still having the problem after eating decent satisfying meals for breakfast and lunch, then it's a habit you need to break, as it is no longer physiological hunger driving the mini-night binge.

0
06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on September 20, 2012
at 01:41 AM

Could also be a magnesium deficiency in your diet. As mentioned above, getting all of your carbs from vegetable sources or going ketogenic for some time would be beneficial. I've also read some anecdotal evidence that chromium supplementation can blunt carb cravings, but again, its just anecdotal "bro-science".

-Matt
PhysiqueRescue.com

0
De641ff2accb4975e1f42886b43009db

(2227)

on September 20, 2012
at 12:55 AM

I used to struggle with this as well. This won't help, but now days money is super tight and I can't afford to splurge on non-optimal foods. I also fast morning to anywhere between 1PM and 6PM, just depends on if I find time to make lunch the night/morning of.

That might not work for you, but when you fast it's hard to eat too many calories within a restricted eating window. Sorry for the very non-scientific answer, but that was my progression from this problem.

0
Bbfba36cb57e413444d19004911b7510

on September 20, 2012
at 12:35 AM

In Julia Ross's "The Mood Cure" she attributes late night cravings of sweets, carbs alch, etc. to be a sign serotonin deficiency. She recommends supplementing with 5-HDP a precursor to serotonin when the cravings hit as well as eating at least 20 grams of protein at each meal in order to have enough amino acids to produce the serotonin. Eventually as you increase your body's natural ability to replenish serotonin you need to supplement less and less until you naturally have no cravings.

E45c5a1c8df73da5e03bb6e7e90f8420

(644)

on September 20, 2012
at 01:48 AM

Mood Cure is a great book-it's 5-HTP or L-tryptophan to help increase serotonin- L-tryptophan also converts to melatonin so aids in sleep and dreaming...

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