2

votes

If carbs make you hungry, can they be used to burn fat?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created May 11, 2012 at 12:17 AM

I was thinking - if carbs make you hungry, would it be better to eat some carbs, get hungry, and then fast? Would this kick start ketosis?

It seems like making your body hungry might make it burn fat. And carbs do that.

Matthew

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on May 13, 2012
at 06:06 PM

Not necessarily. If they have insulin resistance, then they might have higher insulin and higher FFAs both. I'm not sure. It's a good question.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on May 12, 2012
at 05:19 AM

I suppose this would mean obese people should have lower levels of free fatty acids in their blood because they're all getting "insulined" into fat tissue where they remain locked up and inaccessible.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on May 11, 2012
at 07:21 PM

"Growth hormone, cortisol, glucagon, and epinephrin can all change the blood glucose levels and keep energy on the up and up." Sure they can, but every one of them will be trumped by insulin. It's not about good and evil. Who said that? We all need insulin. It's about excess fat storage. If you want to get rid of that, you need to have periods where insulin is lowered. And if you want to get in ketosis, which is what the OP asked about, you absolutely have to restrict carbs.

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on May 11, 2012
at 06:38 PM

As Amber said, hunger can mean many things. It is appropriate before meals. If you don't get hungry ever, there's a problem. But if you get hungry too quickly, that is also a problem. Let's not try to make things simple good are bad. I don't like the game that's played of pretending that insulin is the ultimate evil either. Insulin will be elevated for about two hours after a meal and should go back down to normal. That's not going to lock energy up. Growth hormone, cortisol, glucagon, and epinephrin can all change the blood glucose levels and keep energy on the up and up.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on May 11, 2012
at 04:07 PM

Actually, I guess metabolizing carbohydrates could plausibly deplete nutrition, but that doesn't appear to be the mechanism for them causing a hunger response.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on May 11, 2012
at 03:59 PM

Exactly. I can't believe this has been downvoted twice. There are a few different things that hunger can mean. One is that you are used to eating at this time, and your body is in a rhythm of expecting food. One is that there are nutrients you are missing that you need to get from outside, such as protein or vitamins or essential fatty acids. Another is that you don't have access to enough energy. The first two couldn't be responses to eating carbohydrate. The last one absolutely can be caused by eating carbohydrate: the insulin response makes fat tend to be stored instead of used.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on May 11, 2012
at 12:21 PM

Sounds like a kick start for catabolism, and as likely to waste muscle as burn fat. The only way to find out is to try it.

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3 Answers

6
B8592e62f9804ddabae73c1103d6bcb9

(1956)

on May 11, 2012
at 11:39 AM

If anything the hunger means you're storing fat. Carbohydrates raise insulin which keeps fat in the fat cells. The body then gets hungry because all the calories are locked up and inaccessible.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mNYlIcXynwE, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yo3TRbkIrow

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on May 11, 2012
at 07:21 PM

"Growth hormone, cortisol, glucagon, and epinephrin can all change the blood glucose levels and keep energy on the up and up." Sure they can, but every one of them will be trumped by insulin. It's not about good and evil. Who said that? We all need insulin. It's about excess fat storage. If you want to get rid of that, you need to have periods where insulin is lowered. And if you want to get in ketosis, which is what the OP asked about, you absolutely have to restrict carbs.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on May 11, 2012
at 04:07 PM

Actually, I guess metabolizing carbohydrates could plausibly deplete nutrition, but that doesn't appear to be the mechanism for them causing a hunger response.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on May 11, 2012
at 03:59 PM

Exactly. I can't believe this has been downvoted twice. There are a few different things that hunger can mean. One is that you are used to eating at this time, and your body is in a rhythm of expecting food. One is that there are nutrients you are missing that you need to get from outside, such as protein or vitamins or essential fatty acids. Another is that you don't have access to enough energy. The first two couldn't be responses to eating carbohydrate. The last one absolutely can be caused by eating carbohydrate: the insulin response makes fat tend to be stored instead of used.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on May 12, 2012
at 05:19 AM

I suppose this would mean obese people should have lower levels of free fatty acids in their blood because they're all getting "insulined" into fat tissue where they remain locked up and inaccessible.

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on May 11, 2012
at 06:38 PM

As Amber said, hunger can mean many things. It is appropriate before meals. If you don't get hungry ever, there's a problem. But if you get hungry too quickly, that is also a problem. Let's not try to make things simple good are bad. I don't like the game that's played of pretending that insulin is the ultimate evil either. Insulin will be elevated for about two hours after a meal and should go back down to normal. That's not going to lock energy up. Growth hormone, cortisol, glucagon, and epinephrin can all change the blood glucose levels and keep energy on the up and up.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on May 13, 2012
at 06:06 PM

Not necessarily. If they have insulin resistance, then they might have higher insulin and higher FFAs both. I'm not sure. It's a good question.

3
01adafcb4dd4147c6af543f61eee60a8

on May 11, 2012
at 03:04 AM

Lol im no expert but I suppose carbs would prevent ketosis

2
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on May 11, 2012
at 03:05 AM

Hunger doesn't necessarily imply you're burning any more calories than if you weren't. It might, but I don't agree that carbs make you hungry so I'm having trouble really evaluating the premise of this question.

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