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votes

How are non-starchy vegetable carbs different from starchy vegetable carbs?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 09, 2012 at 10:11 AM

I mean, they all end up as glucose in the end, right? So what's the difference between those two and why is it some people don't count non-starchy vegetables as part of their carb consumption?

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on November 11, 2012
at 07:18 PM

Thanks, you put it better than I ever could, even when I'm lazy (as perhaps I was in that answer ;) )

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 09, 2012
at 09:44 PM

Gycemic index results from mixing macronutrients, more or less in weight ratio. If you mix a lot of indigestible fiber, fat or protein (0 GI) with a little bit of starch or glucose (100 GI), the resulting GI is very low.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 09, 2012
at 01:25 PM

Cooked starch in grains and tubers contains so much more digestible carb per gram than leafy greens which are composed of fiber and plant juice (dilute sugar water).

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5 Answers

4
Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

on November 09, 2012
at 10:14 AM

I dare say fibre and relative energy density...

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on November 11, 2012
at 07:18 PM

Thanks, you put it better than I ever could, even when I'm lazy (as perhaps I was in that answer ;) )

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 09, 2012
at 01:25 PM

Cooked starch in grains and tubers contains so much more digestible carb per gram than leafy greens which are composed of fiber and plant juice (dilute sugar water).

3
F694fc245d03b64d6936ddb29f4c9306

(2613)

on November 09, 2012
at 03:15 PM

Compare 200 calories of celery to 200 calories of potatoes:

how-are-non-starchy-vegetable-carbs-different-from-starchy-vegetable-carbs? how-are-non-starchy-vegetable-carbs-different-from-starchy-vegetable-carbs?

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1
4e6baf393fd5f339ae5a92ffbeadc884

on November 09, 2012
at 01:05 PM

I can't see why anyone would not count non-starchy vegetables as part of their carb consumption. Sugar or starch it is all carbs.

However it is not necessarily the end point, e.g glucose etc that people are concerned about it is the starting points that often do matter and the consequent effects on gut flora; peoples reactions to starch and sugars do vary. Starch will make me very ill (as an HLA B27+ person, any starch will kick start an auto-immune reaction). Non starchy vegetables will not do this as the carbohydrates will already be mostly be sugars.

0
543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on November 09, 2012
at 10:05 PM

"why is it some people don't count non-starchy vegetables as part of their carb consumption?"

i found this quote by Paul Jaminet, which may help answer that one;

Vegetables as Poor Glucose Sources

Some responders were understandably confused by a line Jimmy quoted out of context from our book: “don’t count vegetables as as a carb source – they are a fiber (and therefore a fat) source” (page 45).

The point is that vegetables are not usually helpful in repairing a glucose deficiency. A typical vegetable has about 80 carb calories per pound, half as glucose and half as fructose. The digestive tract typically consumes about 50 calories of glucose in digesting a pound of vegetable matter, due to intestinal and immune utilization. Some fructose may be converted to glycogen and then to glucose, but some may be converted to fat and much may be intercepted by gut bacteria. Fructose malabsorption is a widespread problem. So the net contribution of vegetables to the body’s glucose status is small and may be negative.

Since we recommend counting calories only for a few days until one learns how much one must eat to obtain our recommended 400 calories per day of glucose, there is no reason to include vegetables in calorie counting. Vegetables are recommended in our diet due to their micronutrient and fiber content, not their carbohydrate content.

0
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on November 09, 2012
at 08:56 PM

The glycemic index/glycemic load of starchy veggies is much different from non-starchy veggies. There's a lot more fiber to break down before the sugars in non-starchy veggies hit the bloodstream.

And, asl Elunah points out, the volume of non-starchy veggies to get the same amount of simple sugar is high--hard to eat that much celery, very easy to eat those few french fries!

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 09, 2012
at 09:44 PM

Gycemic index results from mixing macronutrients, more or less in weight ratio. If you mix a lot of indigestible fiber, fat or protein (0 GI) with a little bit of starch or glucose (100 GI), the resulting GI is very low.

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