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Hack my post workout/morning meal, I am confused! (PLEASE HELP)

Answered on January 14, 2015
Created May 17, 2013 at 12:17 AM

Hey, So after finding most of the information I've been looking for, I just wanted to get some feedback on my nutrition-

6 am- workout on empty stomach

Then once I've finished my workout -

  • 30 grams of carbs( coconut water/sweet potato) and 10 or so grams of protein(egg white)

Then, about 45 mins to an hour later, I have a smoothie for breakfast with-

  • 1 scoop protein
  • 1 cup raspberries/strawberries
  • 1 teaspoon raw cacao powder
  • 1 scoop boku superfood
  • 1 tablespoon raw organic almond butter/coconut butter,

this has a fairly high carb count, and about 8 grams of sugar

Would it be better to have a whole food breakfast after the coconut/sweet potato and protein mixture I down immediately post-workout, or, alternatively, would it be better to simply have the smoothie for my post workout meal, but add some protein and carbs to it in the form of sweet potato/protein powder? Would it be bad to have post workout considering I do put a tablespoon of almond or coconut butter(fat) in it? I am very busy and rushed in the morning, and often find it difficult to make a big meal with my time constraints, so a smoothie has always been really easy for me.

So people, please weigh in with your opinions/feedback, is there any benefit to having just one massive post workout meal, or to split it into two, with my immediate post workout being a carb/protein mix, and my 2nd one having predominantly carbs and protein, and some fat?

FYI, my goals are to lean out, and I currently eat low carb 4 days per week on rest/HIIT days, moderate carb 1 day, and then I have 2 days with high carbs. This question relates to the days I eat high or moderate carb. Thanks!

458b7bac46cb9d6110245305ce8fae44

(88)

on May 19, 2013
at 03:09 PM

Could anyone tell me if this looks alright? I really just want to know if having a small amount of fat(cashews) and fiber in the post workout meal is optimal, considering I am sort of Carb-back loading, with the majority of my carbs coming in the post workout period

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1 Answers

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9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on January 14, 2015
at 04:28 AM

My $0.02.

Generally it is best to get 100% of your calories from whole foods.

After a really tough workout it is hard to eat a square meal, maybe even for 1-2 hours afterwards. There are hormonal and physiological reasons for this.

However a moderate workout needs to be kept in perspective. Riding an exercise bike for 25 minutes is not a tough workout. Doing 50 thrusters, 50 push ups, 50 pull ups, 50 ring dips, and running a mile, all in less than 25 minutes, is a tough workout.

After a truly hard workout, you should have carte Blanche to eat whatever you want for the next 30 minutes. If you are worried about weight then watch the fat, but eat all the carbs and protein you can handle.

Aside from this time, be careful with carbs.

A lot of people who work out a lot and eat a lot forget about raw fruits and vegetables and a varied diet and focus too much on macros.

So what this adds up to is this. After a workout that is really tough, eat whatever you can in any form (shake, bar, etc) within 30 minutes. At all other times, which means after not working out or after a light workout, go easy on the carbs, and focus on VERY diverse fruits and vegetables. Avoid shakes, bars, and supplements and try to get all of your nutrition from actual food.

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