1

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For people who count carb grams, is there a simple list to follow in cups?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 28, 2012 at 4:42 AM

How do you count carb grams? What do you use?

I would love to have a list of carb grams count in foods, especially vegetables, berries and fruit.

I am looking for something simplified like this:

5 carb grams equals.... 1/2 cup of strawberries, 1 cup of cabbage, etc.

10 carb grams equals....

So far all I was able to find is Atkins and an online counter, but it is full of Atkins products and a bit hard to use. Is there a simplified one?

Thank you very much.

06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on September 30, 2012
at 04:28 AM

I wonder if you physician is testing different foods to try and nail down your issue.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 28, 2012
at 07:01 PM

I have tons of digestive issues and the doctor I consulted told me to count carbs and to get a specific number in a day. She also wrote a specific diet plan - so many vegetables. She does not want me to have fruit yet - it was not on the diet list. She mentioned something about metabolism, but I am not sure what I have.

06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on September 28, 2012
at 05:02 PM

Just counting the carbs is too simplistic. Take vegetables: 10g or carbs from a vegetable will be treated much different by the body than 10g from a fruit. But, it gets more complicated. Try comparing 10g of carbs from spinach to 10g of carbs from a banana. Both will effect the body in different ways. What specific medical condition are you trying to control? (Disclaimer: Not a physician)

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 28, 2012
at 04:30 PM

Because the doctor I consulted told me to count them and I have a limit for a day.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 28, 2012
at 11:52 AM

Yup thats it. Its a food diary that tracks all your macros, micros etc, and has a pretty big database of foods.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 28, 2012
at 10:19 AM

Thanks for the tip. I am looking for a list like : cabbage - 1 cup - 5 carbs, apple - large - 15 carbs, etc. This type of thing by food groups. Almost like Atkins but only carbs, nothing else, no vitamins, no nutrients, no calories, just carbs.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 28, 2012
at 10:17 AM

I used to use nutritiondata but honestly I am way too lazy to look up each and every item. I was hoping there is a list somewhere. Thanks for your answer, very informative. I will have to re-read it for better understanding.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 28, 2012
at 10:15 AM

Jamie, what is a crono-meter? This? http://cronometer.com/

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on September 28, 2012
at 10:13 AM

I just use crono-meter. Once youve put in about a weeks worth of foods, youll have a good idea. Not exactly a list though, which was your question.

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5 Answers

2
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on September 28, 2012
at 09:57 AM

It's not that simple, because for natural foods, there is water content and it's going to vary from fruit to fruit, from veggie to veggie. It's actually easier from crap-in-a-bag food like products since those are made to be consistent, though those are estimates as well. (And I'm not promoting that you consume SAD foods.)

Things like leafy greens, you can ignore the carb content of, because it's so small. That probably would include cabbage, though to a lesser extent. Where it gets interesting are fruits, especially apples, bananas, watermelon, beets, cooked carrots/parsnips.

One of the best sites to use is this: http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/1809/2

There are also various lists out there that are meant to be used a glycemic load/index table that sometimes include fructose/glucose breakdown. Such as Table 1 of this wikipedia article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fructose (scroll down about 1/3rd of the way to reach it.) This will list a bunch of common foods per 100g. While that's not in cups, you can sort of estimate. These are IMO, far more useful tools because they give you a hint of which foods to seek out vs avoid depending on whether you're trying to do a carb backload/refeed, or avoid carbs.

Here's another two: http://www.lasting-weight-loss.com/low-carb-vegetables.html http://www.lasting-weight-loss.com/low-carb-fruits.html

The real issue with your question is that a cup is a measure of volume, and what you're looking for is a measure of weight in grams. So the true answer is "it depends on the weight", so, sorry to say that you'll need a kitchen scale. Good news is that they're very cheap: http://www.amazon.com/s?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=kitchen+scale so you'd use the scale to measure a cup of whatever you're about to eat in grabs, divide by 100, then multiply by the grams of carbs of the tables above to get your answer.

This would make an awesome resource, if you were to do this and post the results online somewhere. (Again, it would be an estimate, since it would depend on how hydrated the fruit was vs the reference measure, and cooking would obviously change the water level, weight, and volume of the food, but not the carb counts, so 100g of raisins is not the same as 100g of grapes, and it would also vary from one species of grapes to another.)

The other less obvious issue is that we're not a calorimeter, nor a car engine. What we eat in terms of measured calories isn't what we absorb, which is why calorie counting doesn't really work, even if you were able to measure what you were about to ingest with 100% accuracy.

So in the end, these things are more of a rough guide estimate than an actual true measure. This is why it's better to use things like glycemic load/index and glucose vs fructose counts depending on your goals.

(Myself, I did something very stupid when I was younger by switching from soda to snapple since after all everyone "knew" that soda was bad and tea was good. Of course, what I didn't know is that snapple had just as much HFCS as soda, so from a metabolic point of view the effect was about the same. That lead to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and obesity which took quite a while to get rid of, so I still am weary of high fructose foods, including fruit. Though these days, I don't fear them as much as post workout refeeds.)

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 28, 2012
at 10:17 AM

I used to use nutritiondata but honestly I am way too lazy to look up each and every item. I was hoping there is a list somewhere. Thanks for your answer, very informative. I will have to re-read it for better understanding.

1
06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on September 28, 2012
at 04:15 PM

Why are you worried about the specific grams of Carbs?

Matt
PhysiqueRescue.com

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 28, 2012
at 04:30 PM

Because the doctor I consulted told me to count them and I have a limit for a day.

06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on September 28, 2012
at 05:02 PM

Just counting the carbs is too simplistic. Take vegetables: 10g or carbs from a vegetable will be treated much different by the body than 10g from a fruit. But, it gets more complicated. Try comparing 10g of carbs from spinach to 10g of carbs from a banana. Both will effect the body in different ways. What specific medical condition are you trying to control? (Disclaimer: Not a physician)

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 28, 2012
at 07:01 PM

I have tons of digestive issues and the doctor I consulted told me to count carbs and to get a specific number in a day. She also wrote a specific diet plan - so many vegetables. She does not want me to have fruit yet - it was not on the diet list. She mentioned something about metabolism, but I am not sure what I have.

06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on September 30, 2012
at 04:28 AM

I wonder if you physician is testing different foods to try and nail down your issue.

1
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 28, 2012
at 11:48 AM

I used fitday.com when I started -- I really had no idea what exactly made up the food I was eating.

After a couple of weeks you start to get the hang of it and won't need to use those sites again.

1
931a99246c4b901c8cabd52da1e9f6d2

on September 28, 2012
at 10:54 AM

Calorie King app gives me that info. It does vary but it's eye opening on the fruits and veggies with higher carbs!

1
3234f50f155f16d13fd180a959efb770

on September 28, 2012
at 09:53 AM

I use My Fitness Pal on my phone, but I've used other apps and they're all pretty much the same. I like MFP because I can go to their website and set up goals for how much of each macro- and micro-nutrient (you do not have to use this feature, however). Also use it to keep track of my measurements.

I don't know of a list like you're looking for, but after a while of logging everything I eat, carb counts are almost second nature and I don't have to look things up anymore (although I still log).

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 28, 2012
at 10:19 AM

Thanks for the tip. I am looking for a list like : cabbage - 1 cup - 5 carbs, apple - large - 15 carbs, etc. This type of thing by food groups. Almost like Atkins but only carbs, nothing else, no vitamins, no nutrients, no calories, just carbs.

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