3

votes

Does a blender raise Glycemic Index?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created November 21, 2012 at 10:49 AM

Trying to find ways to get carbs into my system faster during the optimal post training window and spiking insulin harder during carb loads, workout resorting to sugar. Would liquifying Satsumaimo or white rice in my commercial blender raise effective GI?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 26, 2012
at 07:42 PM

Cooked carrots are another food that goes over 100, but anywhere near 100 is top-end. If you follow one of these foods (by itself) with a blood glucose meter you'll see your blood sugar literally shoot up that much on a 2 hour test. I've done it with sushi rice and it's scary.

Medium avatar

(2417)

on November 24, 2012
at 06:20 AM

And FYI, as for CBL, I don't do the junk carbs! I do know however that carbs while your still sweating PWO do wonders, and basically make you sick otherwise.

Medium avatar

(2417)

on November 24, 2012
at 06:19 AM

Ok, fair enough man. Healthy banter is good. A lot of carbs after a big workout when you've been keto a few days does more than fill glycogen...it gives leptin and other hormonal systems a jump that causes overall leaning effect.

Medium avatar

(2417)

on November 24, 2012
at 06:14 AM

Correct. Hi GI carbs are inherently low fiber. And fat slows absorption down, plus in the presence of an insulin response that comes from such carbs, fat burning is inhibited, making dietary fat injested near that time more likely to be stored in fat cells. That's why leangains says go low fat on training/carb days.

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on November 23, 2012
at 02:50 PM

No. Glucose syrup is defined as 100. If Sonething is absorbed slower then it's less than 100 (most things). But it is possible to have things go faster than glucose. Amylopectin A, for example, in wheat flour, had a GI of 105 in some foods.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on November 22, 2012
at 02:33 PM

It really doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure this one out. I'm surprised you didn't get much ruder responses.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on November 22, 2012
at 02:31 PM

Yeah but you're asking if something that could easily be replicated with careful chewing changes the glycemic index. Heck... you don't even HAVE to chew a boiled potato to get it to blender size. All this takes is incredibly base logic... If you need quick carbs take a simple sugar and dilute it with water and drink. Juicing would probably help with that too.

7b20db75b09540914bd0c852e868a9d6

(454)

on November 22, 2012
at 02:18 PM

if you want a harder spike, dont eat fiber or fat with your carbs, right?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 22, 2012
at 02:05 PM

So where's Robb's data on the continuous glycemic response to eating this mix? That's the question here.

Medium avatar

(2417)

on November 22, 2012
at 12:42 PM

Done that for many months. Works well. Tried Keifer's advice in CBL and been slamming HIGH GI carbs PWO, staying keto otherwise, and poof, muscles GREW, macros and calories unchanged. Period.

Medium avatar

(2417)

on November 22, 2012
at 12:40 PM

I want to get carbs into my muscles using non insulin dependent glucose uptake which is highest after training , not eat a slow carb that trickles glucose for hours and keeps insulin high for hours.

Medium avatar

(2417)

on November 22, 2012
at 12:38 PM

And getting easily absorbed protein in quickly post wo does facilitate speeding up the anabolic process, sparing lean tissues on a fasted trained state. Basically, if you care to be keto, carbs post wo dont matter. But you dont get below 10% bodyfat without strategic carb loads. If you are going to eat carbs at all, immediately pwo is the BEST time to eat them, as its proven uptake by muscles is most efficient then.

Medium avatar

(2417)

on November 22, 2012
at 12:32 PM

The former isn't paleo i mean. Anyway the supp ind is full of lies indeed, to sell you shit based on fear and misinformation. Please don't confuse an experimenter with a sheep. However, your ARE missing something...eating high GI carbs immediately post wo DOES get more glucose into your muscles preferentially due to non insulin mediated glucose uptake (tGLUT translocation). Keifer's CBL makes some good points. I've tested this first hand with my body...pounding high GI carbs within an hour of hard training feels amazing, waiting hours makes me feel terrible. It IS absorbed better.

Medium avatar

(2417)

on November 22, 2012
at 12:26 PM

Tom, I understand your perspective. But, if you've read many of my posts, maybe you'd see im a little more informed than you assume. I eat paleo inspired. Occasionally I chose to modify or tweak things and experiment. Rather than buy a cheap carb powder, I prefer to tinker with a homemade high GI food made from something whole. Do you drive or walk to work? The latter isn't paleo either. That said, I know full well our bodies dont atrophy if we don't eat at special times. I IF 16/8 daily, train fasted, and fast 24hrs weekly.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on November 21, 2012
at 06:33 PM

All the science shows protein to be beneficial post workout, but you are right it is not necessary -- just helpful

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on November 21, 2012
at 02:55 PM

Careful Tom, using science to dispute a pwo is likely to get you downvoted!

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on November 21, 2012
at 02:54 PM

This......don't worry about spiking your insulin anyhow. Protein carries enough response without the extra carbs to shuttle itself.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on November 21, 2012
at 01:49 PM

Man, you guys are kinda mean with the down-votes. This seems to be an honest question.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on November 21, 2012
at 12:50 PM

**without** resorting to?

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on November 21, 2012
at 12:49 PM

without resorting to sugar*?

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on November 21, 2012
at 11:47 AM

Does careful chewing raise Glycemic index?

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6 Answers

5
D05f3050dc3d973b8b81a876202fa99a

(1533)

on November 21, 2012
at 01:27 PM

The "optimal post training window" is snake oil the nutrition and fitness industry has sold you. It's another way they can convince you to consume more to build muscle (which they conveniently offer in every corner of the industry in the form of protein bars etc.) I'd worry about unlearning that before considering the physics of glycemic index.

Do you really think our bodies, and specifically our muscles, are designed to just atrophy over night if we don't get some source of nutrition in a golden half hour window?

3
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on November 23, 2012
at 02:30 AM

No because the glycemic index is a ratio of average blood glucose change per gram of congested food. The format of the food has zero effect on the GI.

Is what you are actually asking is whether fast consumption of a food would result in a quicker spike in blood glucose level? Then the answer is yes, of course. But liquifying it would have 0 added benefit than just shoving it down your gullet quickly. The trick would be fast consumption (perhaps liquifying would be the best -- although dehydrating, and then grinding up into pill form might be even better).

1
Medium avatar

on November 22, 2012
at 12:54 PM

Personally I expected more creative and constructive feedback regarding my question, which is about using a bit of modern ingenuity to modify whole real food for the purpose of honest bodily experimentation , rather than lectures as if I have no idea about the basic tenets and philosophy of the whole Paleolithic diet.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on November 22, 2012
at 02:31 PM

Yeah but you're asking if something that could easily be replicated with careful chewing changes the glycemic index. Heck... you don't even HAVE to chew a boiled potato to get it to blender size. All this takes is incredibly base logic... If you need quick carbs take a simple sugar and dilute it with water and drink. Juicing would probably help with that too.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on November 22, 2012
at 02:33 PM

It really doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure this one out. I'm surprised you didn't get much ruder responses.

0
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on November 22, 2012
at 04:43 PM

Yes, the glycemic index is essentially a measure of the body's response to carbohydrate consumption over a (two-hour?) window of time. Anything you can do that will make it quicker to get carbs into your system will elicit a bigger response in a shorter time, effectively increasing the glycemic index.

That's one reason why drinking your calories makes you fat. You're smacking your body really hard very fast with a large dose of carbs and why fibrous foods generally have a lower GI, they need more time to digest before they get into the blood.

I'm not commenting if what your plan is is good or bad, others have done that. I have my opinions but I don't know enough about your goals to comment.

0
Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 22, 2012
at 01:59 PM

Very doubtful. Glucose syrup at 100 GI is the best you can do, and cooked sticky rice is already close to that level. Blending it might reduce the particle size and make it digest very slightly faster, but it won't break the polysaccharide chains of the starch into glucose sugar units.

The time delay for glycemic index tests is two hours, so continuous glycemic response might vary with the food preparation. However, by the time digested starch reaches the small intestine for absorption it will probably be completely converted to glucose without regard to whether it had been in a blender.

This might be of interest. http://www.gssiweb.com/article_detail.aspx?articleid=37

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on November 23, 2012
at 02:50 PM

No. Glucose syrup is defined as 100. If Sonething is absorbed slower then it's less than 100 (most things). But it is possible to have things go faster than glucose. Amylopectin A, for example, in wheat flour, had a GI of 105 in some foods.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 26, 2012
at 07:42 PM

Cooked carrots are another food that goes over 100, but anywhere near 100 is top-end. If you follow one of these foods (by itself) with a blood glucose meter you'll see your blood sugar literally shoot up that much on a 2 hour test. I've done it with sushi rice and it's scary.

0
3089dd0b9a8f1d24f1b08d6cc3ca84e3

(363)

on November 21, 2012
at 06:26 PM

Large sweet potato pwo , some protein chicken , fish , beef etc... jus as Robb Wolf recommends

Medium avatar

(2417)

on November 22, 2012
at 12:42 PM

Done that for many months. Works well. Tried Keifer's advice in CBL and been slamming HIGH GI carbs PWO, staying keto otherwise, and poof, muscles GREW, macros and calories unchanged. Period.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 22, 2012
at 02:05 PM

So where's Robb's data on the continuous glycemic response to eating this mix? That's the question here.

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