4

votes

Do carbs transport protein?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 28, 2013 at 1:00 AM

My mom is pre diabetic and once we were talking about how carbohydrates can affect your body, and she said the doctor told her to eat plenty of carbs because they transport protein to your cells. Thats not true is it? I have never been able to confirm this anywhere. (This was awhile back - she eats gluten free and low carb now)

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on January 30, 2013
at 03:06 PM

Bro science for tha win!

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on January 30, 2013
at 03:04 PM

@Dan Both carbs and protein increase insulin, though protein triggers glucagon which mediates insulin.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on January 28, 2013
at 08:39 PM

+1 great answer.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on January 28, 2013
at 03:24 AM

What other than carbs increases insulin?

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on January 28, 2013
at 01:27 AM

bro-science is like gym-rat science.

D87cf7bb07cfc85acf7203c17065d239

(268)

on January 28, 2013
at 01:09 AM

Thanks! Idk what bro science means lol.

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on January 28, 2013
at 01:01 AM

Carbs no, insulin yes.

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3 Answers

3
E253f8ac1d139bf4d0bfb44debd1db21

on January 28, 2013
at 11:20 AM

Amino acids enter cells via amino acid-specific transport proteins. For example, Solute Carrier 1 (SLC1) transports glutamate and ionically neutral amino acids across the cell membrane.

None of the amino acid solute carrier proteins require insulin (or glucose) to enable transport. Many of them are sodium dependant and require a sodium molecule to bind along with the amino acid to be transported.

Insulin can change sodium and potassium concentrations because of the sodium potassium pump. In effect, insulin drives glucose and potassium into the cell whilst releasing sodium out of the cell. The excess sodium flux is then used to drive the amino acid transporters.

So it's not the carbs that are driving the amino acids into the cell but the salt.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on January 28, 2013
at 08:39 PM

+1 great answer.

2
3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on January 28, 2013
at 01:45 AM

Protein causes the necessary insulin response to carry it into cells with or without carbs. Your doctor needs to go back and retake physiology 101. Or perhaps your mother just misunderstood a bit.

1
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on January 28, 2013
at 01:05 AM

WARNING! What follows is all bro-science, but it might be grounded in some truth.

Carbs do help transport protein, specifically, amino acids. How? Because insulin sensitive muscle cells store glucose. Glucose comes from carbs. When you eat carbs and protein together, the carbs help transport the amino acids directly to the muscle cells for growth and repair.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on January 28, 2013
at 01:27 AM

bro-science is like gym-rat science.

D87cf7bb07cfc85acf7203c17065d239

(268)

on January 28, 2013
at 01:09 AM

Thanks! Idk what bro science means lol.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on January 30, 2013
at 03:06 PM

Bro science for tha win!

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