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Do carbs= sugar? Are all carbs the same?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 07, 2013 at 6:49 AM

If you eat 50 carbs worth of cabbage, is it the same as 50 carbs from bread?

Would 50 carbs from cabbage be the same as the sugar you'd get from 50 carbs of candy?

Is the sugar in something like red cabbage the same as the sugar in soda? Would too much sugar from red cabbage have the same health detriments as too much sugar from soda and junk food?

Are there any foods where 50 gs of carbs is essentially 50gs of sugar? Do all carbs equal sugar, or is there a difference between food types?

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on January 08, 2013
at 03:46 AM

no need to apologise Keith

3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on January 07, 2013
at 11:35 PM

"50g of outright sugar (ie, candy) barely bothers me at all". I wonder if this is because most candy is primarily HFCS which won't show up as blood GLUCOSE on the meter, but has a definite effect on the liver.

88721bda318289a6e6efb215cd6ba2cd

(78)

on January 07, 2013
at 06:26 PM

My apologies, being from the US Mathis is what I know. Thank you for clearing that up.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on January 07, 2013
at 09:47 AM

come on borofergie, you know you wanted to type fibre (UK spelling, right?)

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on January 07, 2013
at 09:44 AM

that did not address all of your 6 or so questions...but its a start

B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on January 07, 2013
at 09:30 AM

yes - in the UK "Total Carbs" excludes fiber, which is sensible.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on January 07, 2013
at 08:35 AM

food labelling of fiber (or non-US spelling fibre) actually differs around the world. in some countries fibre is not listed at all, or not listed as a sub-line under carbohydrates (as in the US). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dietary_fiber#Fiber_and_calories , http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_energy#Nutrition_labels

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on January 07, 2013
at 08:34 AM

food labelling of fiber (or non-US spelling fibre) actually differs around the world. in some countries fibre is with not listed at all, or not listed as a sub-line under carbohydrates (as in the US). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dietary_fiber#Fiber_and_calories & http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_energy#Nutrition_labels

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on January 07, 2013
at 08:19 AM

Bob Smith aka Michael McDonald? :) http://perfecthealthdiet.com/q-a/comment-page-49/#comment-114745

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6 Answers

2
Dbb6872f139877fe1a94aeb471baa7d1

on January 07, 2013
at 11:25 AM

As a type 1 diabetic constantly monitoring her sugar -- there is absolutely a difference. 50g of bread will absolutely KILL my sugar for hours, if not days. 50g of fruit will ruin me for the rest of the day. 50g of a starchy vegetable is not so bad and, ironically, 50g of outright sugar (ie, candy) barely bothers me at all. Weirdly, popcorn doesn't touch my sugar AT ALL, but I think that's because I'm sensitive to it gastrointestinally, and I don't really digest it at all.

What this means is that each type of carb, even if they're technically the same amount, requires a different amount of insulin to deal with, and has a different impact on the rest of my body.

3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on January 07, 2013
at 11:35 PM

"50g of outright sugar (ie, candy) barely bothers me at all". I wonder if this is because most candy is primarily HFCS which won't show up as blood GLUCOSE on the meter, but has a definite effect on the liver.

2
028e70a250f38bd61fa81b0e0789bb6e

on January 07, 2013
at 07:16 AM

Short answer: no.

Thing is, you can never consume so much cabbage so quickly. 50 grams of carbs worth of cabbage is quite a lot, and consume that all at once ... you will probably have a diarrhea and poop everything out anyways. Plus your body will give you multiple signals throughout your eating, telling you to not eat anymore.

I don't know the exact numbers, but the discomfort will usually prevent a normal person from consuming carbs from cabbage as quickly as a SAD eater from bread.

While refined white bread can be consumed much more easily, and soda is even addictive.

1
543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on January 07, 2013
at 09:31 AM

Sugar is just one type of carbohydrate.
And there are many type of sugars (& many types of carbohydrates).

'table sugar' is a common type of sugar, the 'official' name for table sugar is sucrose, sucrose is made up of 50% glucose and 50% fructose.

As well as sucrose, glucose and fructose, a few more sugars are galactose, maltose and lactose.
Source: types of sugars

A natural food with the highest sugar content (that i could find) are Dates, see here and here, where more or less all of the carbs are sugars (if you ignore the fiber).

I find the NutritionData nutrient search tool very handy for searching for foods that are highest or lowest in specific nutrients. Give it a try if you have not seen it before, it can search on all sorts of info.

For "foods" where carbs are 100% sugar or close to it, then you have processed (to varying extents) sugars (ie raw cane sugar) and syrups.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on January 07, 2013
at 09:44 AM

that did not address all of your 6 or so questions...but its a start

1
C657d176db6f11f98aeb2a89071e3281

on January 07, 2013
at 08:07 AM

Soda and candy are processed sugars. A lot of candy and almost all sodas are made out of corn syrup today. The sugars you find in veggies and fruits are natural or unrefined sugars. Processed sugars and high fructose corn syrup is especially tough on the liver.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/17/magazine/mag-17Sugar-t.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

and

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/09/20/craving-an-ice-cream-fix/

0
56046474e7622a04057c579470482133

on January 07, 2013
at 08:01 AM

You might want to read the zone diet by Barry Sears. He deals with good carbs, bad carbs, and balancing your meals to keep insulin spikes from happening. He really goes into detail about why you can eats 8 cups of broccoli, but not 8 cups of dinner rolls. I am Paleo, but really I am a paleo/zone/glycemic index girl. Each taught me great lessons.

0
88721bda318289a6e6efb215cd6ba2cd

on January 07, 2013
at 07:39 AM

Carbs recorded on labels aren't all digested by us. Fiber is counted in the carb line as well as having its Own line. To know how much carbs will be absorbed one Needs to subtract the fiber from the carbs, the left over Is absorbable carbs. 50g of carb from cabbage is a lot.

B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on January 07, 2013
at 09:30 AM

yes - in the UK "Total Carbs" excludes fiber, which is sensible.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on January 08, 2013
at 03:46 AM

no need to apologise Keith

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on January 07, 2013
at 08:35 AM

food labelling of fiber (or non-US spelling fibre) actually differs around the world. in some countries fibre is not listed at all, or not listed as a sub-line under carbohydrates (as in the US). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dietary_fiber#Fiber_and_calories , http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_energy#Nutrition_labels

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on January 07, 2013
at 09:47 AM

come on borofergie, you know you wanted to type fibre (UK spelling, right?)

88721bda318289a6e6efb215cd6ba2cd

(78)

on January 07, 2013
at 06:26 PM

My apologies, being from the US Mathis is what I know. Thank you for clearing that up.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on January 07, 2013
at 08:34 AM

food labelling of fiber (or non-US spelling fibre) actually differs around the world. in some countries fibre is with not listed at all, or not listed as a sub-line under carbohydrates (as in the US). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dietary_fiber#Fiber_and_calories & http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_energy#Nutrition_labels

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