7

votes

Better to eat carbs alone?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 06, 2010 at 10:19 PM

Theoretically, if I were to eat a piece of fruit or something else that is mostly carbs, would it be better to eat it by itself - i.e. without any protein or fat in the meal? My thinking is that an insulin response allows the body to store fat, so limiting the number of calories consumed while insulin levels are high would limit the amount of energy that is stored as fat. I've also heard - mostly from CW - that mixing your carbs with fat, protein and fiber decreases severity of the associated blood sugar spike. However, it seems like that would not be what you want - at least not for fat loss. A certain amount of insulin would need to be released to counter the amount of carbohydrate consumed and spreading it over a longer period of time as well as ingesting more calories that could be stored as fat seems like it would encourage more energy to be stored as fat.

This isn't really for practical use, just curious about the mechanics of it.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 29, 2010
at 02:02 PM

Peter at Hyperlipid wrote something about fasting for rheumatoid arthritis, followed by eating only simple carbs for a bit, in order to not feed bad bacteria. I can't find the article, and it didn't have many studies behind it, but there was logic there (which I don't remember!).

1f70da0b737e9c6e7679a248f4228a01

on August 06, 2010
at 07:43 AM

From what I've seen, the 'studies' tend to be n=1 self-experiments by people with digestive issues. My cousin who has Crohn's has a book detailing the life of a Crohn's sufferer who spent 2 years trialling different combinations of foods to find out what ratios overloaded her ability to digest the various enzymes, etc. It essentially comes back to the acid-balance theory, which can ring true for those whose guts can't produce sufficient acids - but that seems to be as far as the 'science' can demonstrate.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on June 07, 2010
at 03:37 AM

If anyone has any scientific studies that suggest food combining has science behind it, I'd love to see it.

0637289bb4a0ab314d80fa4de627d395

(1015)

on June 06, 2010
at 11:21 PM

http://www.graciemag.com/en/gracie-diet/ I also recommend a google search. There is a lot of information available on the internet.

5ad1c5e83d71e9d83942df6c6f0c4b6a

on June 06, 2010
at 11:10 PM

Is there a website for the Gracies or their work?

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4 Answers

2
0637289bb4a0ab314d80fa4de627d395

(1015)

on June 06, 2010
at 10:49 PM

Cordain addressed this topic in an article. He hinted that there may be something to it. Some people, like the Gracies', follow a food combining diet. They only combine certain food groups. The wrong combination can turn otherwise good foods into a toxic mess. At least according to their folklore. I am looking forward to getting their diet book when it is released. I am hoping they will address some of the chemistry of food combinations beyond macronutrients percentages.

0637289bb4a0ab314d80fa4de627d395

(1015)

on June 06, 2010
at 11:21 PM

http://www.graciemag.com/en/gracie-diet/ I also recommend a google search. There is a lot of information available on the internet.

5ad1c5e83d71e9d83942df6c6f0c4b6a

on June 06, 2010
at 11:10 PM

Is there a website for the Gracies or their work?

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on June 07, 2010
at 03:37 AM

If anyone has any scientific studies that suggest food combining has science behind it, I'd love to see it.

1f70da0b737e9c6e7679a248f4228a01

on August 06, 2010
at 07:43 AM

From what I've seen, the 'studies' tend to be n=1 self-experiments by people with digestive issues. My cousin who has Crohn's has a book detailing the life of a Crohn's sufferer who spent 2 years trialling different combinations of foods to find out what ratios overloaded her ability to digest the various enzymes, etc. It essentially comes back to the acid-balance theory, which can ring true for those whose guts can't produce sufficient acids - but that seems to be as far as the 'science' can demonstrate.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 29, 2010
at 02:02 PM

Peter at Hyperlipid wrote something about fasting for rheumatoid arthritis, followed by eating only simple carbs for a bit, in order to not feed bad bacteria. I can't find the article, and it didn't have many studies behind it, but there was logic there (which I don't remember!).

1
4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

on June 07, 2010
at 03:31 AM

My understanding had to do with stomach ph reaction to do with meat and with digesting carbs compete and therefore are a bad mix

enter the Standard American Diet, SAD Hamburger.

0
431274eafd914ee34d9c57262c1f617a

on June 07, 2010
at 12:38 AM

For me, I find that as long as I keep my carb calories under a certain percent of my total calories, I do fine. But if I were to eat fruit alone the resulting spike and drop would send me craving more carbs!!

I never eat fruit alone. With a meal or snack, always with protein and fat....mainly fat.

0
6188c402b800087ffda0d69f5147285e

on June 07, 2010
at 12:16 AM

While eating a more dense carbohydrate with protein, or fat will blunt the insulin response, by delaying gastric emptying. This can also be accomplished with lime juice, or vinegar I believe. The acid also serve to delay the gastric emptying. In practical terms for fat loss I would worry less about what I combined with fruit or more dense carbs, and focus instead on both the frequency of their intake and if possible pair these foods with glycogen depleting activities (ie post workout). For most effective weight-loss and dealing with those who are severely insulin resistance the complete elimination of fruits from the diet is a common recommendation.

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