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Anyone seen My Big Fat Diet movie about First Nations (natives) obese diabetics of Canada improving on Paleo?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 23, 2012 at 6:09 PM

This is trial with obese diabetics (55% of Native heritage) eating a traditional pre-contact diet of fish, meat, wild plants, and berries.

Nice poster of the improvement of weight, body comp, A1C, Blood lipids over 7 months. http://www.cbc.ca/thelens/bigfatdiet/Poster.pdf

http://www.mybigfatdiet.net/more.html

http://www.cbc.ca/thelens/bigfatdiet/

It's still a work in process.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5152)

on April 13, 2012
at 04:29 AM

Lying is a little too strong. Gary was mainly referring to those inside the US, whereas you seem to be referring to the Pimas and Tarahumaras below the U.S. border. Yes, the 3 sisters were the staple diet for these people. But those to the North ate a higher percentage of carnivorous diet based on fowl and small mammals.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 12, 2012
at 07:12 PM

I'll also toss out here that my wife is Haida, from Haida Gwaii. The indigenous diet even just south of Alaska was indeed mostly fish and seafood however if you've been there you can see that single families will harvest (even today) 100s of pounds of berries in addition to certain fleshy tree barks and roots which are colloquially called "rice root" which is quite starchy.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 12, 2012
at 07:10 PM

Gary Taubes lied about this. Either that or he didn't check his facts well. The Pima's traditional diet was agrarian not hunter-gather. They lived off Three Sisters style agriculture with the vast majority of their calories from squash, corn and beans. Meat was enjoyed, as was fish, but not in large quantities.

53ba4017f8db7f5ebe4af165a3acda93

(30)

on March 29, 2012
at 05:42 PM

A similar study was done on the Pima Indians, comparing the communities that still lived south of Mexican border and ate their traditional (low-carb) diet and those living in Texas, eating a "typical" American diet (read "too much junk food"). The Pima evolved eating game, parts of cactus, and other low-carb foods. Their bodies were genetically programmed to store every carb they consumed for energy, so when they consumed excess carbs, they stored it as fat even faster than normal. It makes sense indigenous people in Canada would respond well to Paleo diet.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 24, 2012
at 01:19 AM

No, I hadn't, but I have now. Thank you!

F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on January 23, 2012
at 06:55 PM

This show aired some time ago.

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3 Answers

1
53ba4017f8db7f5ebe4af165a3acda93

on March 29, 2012
at 06:08 PM

A similar study was done on the Pima Indians, comparing the communities that still lived south of Mexican border and ate their traditional (low-carb) diet and those living in Texas, eating a "typical" American diet (read "too much junk food"). Immigrants from Central America seem especially prone to what we would sometimes call "the starch bomb," blowing up in weight when starting to consume a more high-carb diet. The Pima made good test subjects because they had two genetically related but geographically separated populations to study. The Pima evolved eating game, parts of cactus, and other low-carb foods. Their bodies were genetically programmed to store every carb they consumed for energy, so when they consumed excess carbs, they stored it as fat even faster than normal. So it makes complete sense that indigenous people in Canada would respond well to Paleo diet. However, it should also be noted that these results may not be as rapid and dramatic in populations that have long been consuming more starch-based diets for a very long time. There are populations of people who eat a lot of grains who are not fat and unhealthy. Their lifestyle is not sedentary and requires a lot of calories, more than they can get from animal protein. In Papau New Guinea, enough protein is hard to obtain and the only significant source of carbs is from taro (hard to grow, hard to prepare). Now that improving methods of farming and preparing taro has been a focus of improving the diet of Papau New Guineans, it will be interesting to see how impacts their overall health..

As much as we blame agriculture for changing our diets, it is one of the most significant factors in the development of civilizations. Now that more developed areas of the world have the luxury of not having to hunt and gather for all their daily sustenance, we start to suffer from a disease of plenty. But if vegetarians can thrive with no animals protein and larger quantities of grains and legumes for protein, AND still be healthy, that indicates to me that the Paleo diet is not the only way to eat for everyone. Quality of food is important, but so is quantity.

For more Paleo hacks: http://paleohacks.com/questions/92258/anyone-seen-my-big-fat-diet-movie-about-first-nations-natives-obese-diabetics-o#ixzz1qWr7poJE

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5152)

on April 13, 2012
at 04:29 AM

Lying is a little too strong. Gary was mainly referring to those inside the US, whereas you seem to be referring to the Pimas and Tarahumaras below the U.S. border. Yes, the 3 sisters were the staple diet for these people. But those to the North ate a higher percentage of carnivorous diet based on fowl and small mammals.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 12, 2012
at 07:12 PM

I'll also toss out here that my wife is Haida, from Haida Gwaii. The indigenous diet even just south of Alaska was indeed mostly fish and seafood however if you've been there you can see that single families will harvest (even today) 100s of pounds of berries in addition to certain fleshy tree barks and roots which are colloquially called "rice root" which is quite starchy.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 12, 2012
at 07:10 PM

Gary Taubes lied about this. Either that or he didn't check his facts well. The Pima's traditional diet was agrarian not hunter-gather. They lived off Three Sisters style agriculture with the vast majority of their calories from squash, corn and beans. Meat was enjoyed, as was fish, but not in large quantities.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 02, 2012
at 09:43 PM

Sure did. Interestingly, to me, they wanted to do that experiment in Massett, BC where my wife and her mom's family are from. Sadly the locals just couldn't get it together.

0
06935be03aaa3cc589afb3b5e01268ad

(158)

on February 29, 2012
at 09:23 PM

Haven't seen it, I´m from Denmark. :) But the links are very interesting, I can use it in my job!

:)

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