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Advice for a T2D(with insulin meds) wanting to go paleo?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 20, 2010 at 11:38 PM

Hello, I am not diabetic but I was interested if anyone had any advice or could point me to some articles regarding the practical steps that may be required when transitioning to a paleo diet as well as any dangers that may arise? Can a T2 diabetic simply just go on a paleo diet as long as he/she monitors their blood glucose and adjust their insulin meds accordingly or is it more complicated than that?

Thanks for your help!

3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on September 28, 2010
at 01:23 AM

Sir Andre, HEY COOL. I appreciate the clarification. I'm Taiwanese American and LARD IS IN MY BLOOD and DNA! That's good to hear. Yeah don't pass my sword **hheee hee** Or my pen...

149af6e19a06675614dfbb6838a7d7c0

(3202)

on September 23, 2010
at 03:02 AM

Grace, I just spent 20 minutes looking up the word saturophobic. I was excited to find out why you think Dr. R is afraid of Satyrs...bleet...then it hit me. He is not afraid of saturated fat by any means. He prefers you to eat mono as you are transitioning from glucose to ketone burning. He believes it is more efficient in the beginning. After you are well in the groove, start pouring the butter. He loves MCTs and thinks coconut is the best fuel for the human body. I am heading back to India for a bit, hope to cross your path but never your sword.

3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on September 23, 2010
at 12:55 AM

Andre, ur forward and funny too!! Seriously, you work with Rosedale? I have the greatest respect for him (except he's a bit of a fearsome saturophobic from what I've read *haa!*) You are correct! I push the avoidance of low glucoses just coz transition on paleo definitely can cause it from all the anecdotal stories around. Super low glucoses artifically affected by pharmaceuticals (insulin, orals, whatever even bitter melon or ALCAR) promote hormonal hypoglycemia-related issues, including preventing fat loss as well in addition of course to feeling over CR*PPY, brain dead and faint.

149af6e19a06675614dfbb6838a7d7c0

(3202)

on September 22, 2010
at 07:00 AM

Did I mention Grace that I am a Philematologist?

149af6e19a06675614dfbb6838a7d7c0

(3202)

on September 22, 2010
at 05:32 AM

I beg to differ Grace, but the statement that "I think<90 is getting pretty close" is not correct. Fasting normal healthy adult is 83. I point out that 60-90 is recommended for pregnant women. It is easier to come up than it is to go down. We diabetics are constantly warned about the dangers of "too low", yet diabetics are not dying by the millions round the world from blood sugars that are too low. We are dying because our blood sugars are too high and we get frightened away from tight control by warnings of the "potential" dangers of being too low. I would rather risk a DUI than a DOA.

3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on September 22, 2010
at 04:19 AM

Consider Robb Wolf's Original Diet -Paleo solution! It's more 'updated' imho and includes BACON SATURATED FAT and several supplements which increase insulin sensitivity (if you need it further): carnitine, alpha lipoic acid, CoQ10, etc. Good job for you!

3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on September 22, 2010
at 04:18 AM

I'm a CDE (certified diabetes educator) and I love hearing stories like yours, Mike! That is AWESOME WORK. Wish physicians and endocrinologists would get clued in...!!!

13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on September 21, 2010
at 04:04 PM

Portions of the Bernstein book are available online. There's also a very helpful forum at http://diabetes-book.com/

23814fb403606c0424bf90770dd5c0f5

(477)

on September 21, 2010
at 09:13 AM

I am a Paleo T2 insulin dependent diabetic. I went Bernstein/PaNu(11) over a year ago. Average BG is 88, last A1C was 5.0. Weight went down 35 pounds and no more cholesterol/BP drugs. Still use insulin, but down 30 units a day. No hassles, no probs, just switch. You'll be glad you did.

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6 Answers

3
47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on September 20, 2010
at 11:46 PM

Forgive me if you know already, but Dr. Bernstein's book is the usual source for this. There's also another book focused on diet, which is maybe more appropriate for your or your friend's concerns.

13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on September 21, 2010
at 04:04 PM

Portions of the Bernstein book are available online. There's also a very helpful forum at http://diabetes-book.com/

3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on September 22, 2010
at 04:18 AM

I'm a CDE (certified diabetes educator) and I love hearing stories like yours, Mike! That is AWESOME WORK. Wish physicians and endocrinologists would get clued in...!!!

23814fb403606c0424bf90770dd5c0f5

(477)

on September 21, 2010
at 09:13 AM

I am a Paleo T2 insulin dependent diabetic. I went Bernstein/PaNu(11) over a year ago. Average BG is 88, last A1C was 5.0. Weight went down 35 pounds and no more cholesterol/BP drugs. Still use insulin, but down 30 units a day. No hassles, no probs, just switch. You'll be glad you did.

0
3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on September 22, 2010
at 04:25 AM

Woly, I'd concur with all the excellent answers above! Please let your friend know that monitoring frequently with their glucometer is imperative to catch and prevent hypoglycemia. Checking 1 hour after meals (goal 100-140) is as important as pre-meal (goal 80-100).

Whether keeping carb % the same (for instance 20% or 40% of diet), the insulin sensitivity dramatically improves on Paleo because the gut dysbiosis from gluten/lectin/phytates improves and suddenly inflammation, bloating and slowed metabolism will be reversed. Exercise will change insulin requirements greatly too.

This means significantly less insulin required. They need to work closely with their physician so the insulin doses can be cranked back.

Hypoglycemia is glucoses < 70s but I think < 90s is getting pretty close. Running with slightly higher glucoses during transitions is MUCH MORE PRUDENT than any lows.

A car accident while driving with hypoglycemia may result in a 'DUI' believe it or not and potential consequences (license revoked) so avoiding hypoglycemia besides inducing comas can't be overstated.

149af6e19a06675614dfbb6838a7d7c0

(3202)

on September 22, 2010
at 05:32 AM

I beg to differ Grace, but the statement that "I think<90 is getting pretty close" is not correct. Fasting normal healthy adult is 83. I point out that 60-90 is recommended for pregnant women. It is easier to come up than it is to go down. We diabetics are constantly warned about the dangers of "too low", yet diabetics are not dying by the millions round the world from blood sugars that are too low. We are dying because our blood sugars are too high and we get frightened away from tight control by warnings of the "potential" dangers of being too low. I would rather risk a DUI than a DOA.

149af6e19a06675614dfbb6838a7d7c0

(3202)

on September 22, 2010
at 07:00 AM

Did I mention Grace that I am a Philematologist?

3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on September 23, 2010
at 12:55 AM

Andre, ur forward and funny too!! Seriously, you work with Rosedale? I have the greatest respect for him (except he's a bit of a fearsome saturophobic from what I've read *haa!*) You are correct! I push the avoidance of low glucoses just coz transition on paleo definitely can cause it from all the anecdotal stories around. Super low glucoses artifically affected by pharmaceuticals (insulin, orals, whatever even bitter melon or ALCAR) promote hormonal hypoglycemia-related issues, including preventing fat loss as well in addition of course to feeling over CR*PPY, brain dead and faint.

149af6e19a06675614dfbb6838a7d7c0

(3202)

on September 23, 2010
at 03:02 AM

Grace, I just spent 20 minutes looking up the word saturophobic. I was excited to find out why you think Dr. R is afraid of Satyrs...bleet...then it hit me. He is not afraid of saturated fat by any means. He prefers you to eat mono as you are transitioning from glucose to ketone burning. He believes it is more efficient in the beginning. After you are well in the groove, start pouring the butter. He loves MCTs and thinks coconut is the best fuel for the human body. I am heading back to India for a bit, hope to cross your path but never your sword.

3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on September 28, 2010
at 01:23 AM

Sir Andre, HEY COOL. I appreciate the clarification. I'm Taiwanese American and LARD IS IN MY BLOOD and DNA! That's good to hear. Yeah don't pass my sword **hheee hee** Or my pen...

0
62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on September 21, 2010
at 02:30 AM

OK, when you talk about 'insulin meds' I am assuming you are not taking insulin itself, just some kind of meds to assist your still functioning pancreas. I am also assuming you have a glucometer and can test your own bgs. If so, this helps as you can see how you are progressing and make sure your bg numbers aren't getting too low. As a type 2, your eventual goal will be to keep carb intake low to minimize blood glucose spikes and allow your pancreas some relief. SOme people find they can eventually get off meds this way, but a lot depends on how much damage has already been done. Low carb is not a miracle cure and can't fix everyone. It can help a lot of people though.

There are two ways to go paleo. One is to jump in and do it all at once from day one. The other is to slowly transition. The advantages of jumping in is you can get the health benefits faster and for those who have temporary cravings for their old types of foods, they can get past those faster. The downside is that some people's bodies take a while to transition and if they do it quickly, they will sometimes experience a temporary state of overall tiredness nicknamed 'the lowcarb flu' until their body adjusts.

Another method, is to cut out things one at a time. My advice would be to cut out processed food and wheat first. Transition to whole foods and maybe a bit of whole fruit and cooked potatoes. Adapt to that and see your blood sugars are doing. And then slowly downgrade the amount of carb you are eating. Watch your blood sugars as you go. Some find they need to stay away from fruit and tubers in order to keep either their weight or their blood sugars in a good range. Others find they can have a bit more of those and still be fine. You will have to learn what is best for you. Obviously, this little synopsis isn't going to cover everything, but at least you can get the gist of it.

0
149af6e19a06675614dfbb6838a7d7c0

on September 21, 2010
at 02:00 AM

Insulin and Sulphonureas are the only 2 meds that you have to worry about going too low. A type 2 or Type 1 needs to step it down slowly since they are on insulin. They will feel shaky even at a high blood sugar as they drop if that is not their usual bottom BS. For example; if they normally hit between 130 and 200, going to 110 (which is high for a fasting) will feel too low. Step it down in chunks weekly till you get to normal for a healthy young adult...ie. 83 fasting to 120 after meals. High fat, moderate protein and low carb is the diet for metabolic syndrome or for anybody. Check your BS before each meal, then 1-2 hours after and then 5-6 hours after becuase of gluconeogenisis. As you step the carbs down, step the meds down. Read Doc Bernstein's "The Law of Small Numbers". The smaller the number the smaller the mistake. The bigger the number the bigger the mistake. The basal will also have to be monitored as it will need to be reduced as well. Carry glucose tabs (4 grams each) just in case you need to come up fast. Soon enough, any type 2 will enjoy health as they have not seen it since before their BS increased and leptin/insulin resistance started. Then it will be dropping the insulin meds as well. Low carb is for life as high carb is for death.

0
Ce0b5fd94b1034e96cf710b6f138c29d

on September 21, 2010
at 01:10 AM

I was on low dosages of Metformin, having just been diagnosed with Type II diabetes, when I went Paleo. I'd had a fasting BG test of 12.6 MMOL/l at my diagnosis. A couple months of Paleo basically halved that and I am now off the Metformin with my doctor's blessing.

I just bought Cordain's The Paleo Diet and went for it.

3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on September 22, 2010
at 04:19 AM

Consider Robb Wolf's Original Diet -Paleo solution! It's more 'updated' imho and includes BACON SATURATED FAT and several supplements which increase insulin sensitivity (if you need it further): carnitine, alpha lipoic acid, CoQ10, etc. Good job for you!

0
06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on September 21, 2010
at 12:54 AM

I have a friend who is diabetic and on meds to control his blood sugar. He went almost zero carb with absolutely no wheat products but did not monitor his fasting morning glucose closely and dang near ended up in the hospital passed out from low blood sugar....because he didn't dial back his meds. His pre-paleo fasting blood glucose was around 250 to 300. He is now med free and zero carb with a morning average fasting blood glucose 100-105. This after having two cardiac events which resulted in stints. His cardiologist never gave him any nutritional advice...just here is a perscription for metformin. Now his cardiologist is just skeptical of his progress and wants him to still take his metformin...just in case his blood glucose goes back up...of course it will not. We still have a long way to go with the lamestream medical community.

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