1

votes

What is a progression of "safe"/"less harmful" starches to most harmful? (suggestions for making a convenience/energy-requiring non-Paleo diet healthier)

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 25, 2013 at 2:15 AM

A very close friend eats grains/carbs at the moment and is on a very tight budget (~$85-110 a month for food), sometimes with limited access to cooking. While they've expressed wishes to transition to Paleo/primal/ancient-type diet, right now, convenience, having energy, and consistent availability of food are tantamount.

That said, currently, their diet consists of: moderately additive-free whole grain bread [The gluten is potentially worrying, but they say their system seems to tolerate it fine], organic almond butter, and raw honey (high-quality) sandwiches, and some raw veggies (greens/carrots), as well as occasional treats from friends to pork-fried rice/conventionally raised roasted chicken/steamed veggies. Cheap, hard-boiled eggs are the next consideration for incorporation. Hydration is also well-emphasized.

As far as I can tell, they also either do better with some moderate amount of carbohydrates in their diet or are not fat-digestion adapted yet.


Please suggest a list of starches, grains, legumes, or other carbohydrates and a progression from safest to most harmful.

Also, highlighting the least expensive or easiest to prepare (such as white rice, perhaps?) and the reasons why particular carbohydrates are more or less harmful would be very helpful.

If there are other alternatives or better ways to structure this diet, please let me know.


[Edit]: As the budget becomes less tight, what might be a good way to begin transitioning to a Paleo/primal/ancient-type diet (especially for longevity), while still emphasizing convenience, energy-provision, and consistent availability?

(no/minor overweight problems -- perhaps 5-10 lbs at most [& some unusual recent creeping abdominal/upper thigh fat that would be nice to fix].

And most damage (metabolic or otherwise) is not really visible and from half a year to a year of eating processed foods especially much & occasionally spurts of too much caffeine/sugar & processed foods in the years prior to that)

C6648ab69e5a1560c7585fe3ba7108fb

(880)

on July 25, 2013
at 12:54 PM

I'd also recommend adding in Plantains, if you can find them. They're a nice alternative to bananas that, depending on when you eat them (i.e. how ripe they are) can be mainly starch or a mixture of starch and glucose/fructose (I think...I assume that's why they become more sweet as they ripen.)

7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d

(5959)

on July 25, 2013
at 12:44 PM

In the body, starch is pure glucose, and with my blood sugar issues, I do much better with sweet foods than starchy foods. I can eat an entire pint of ice cream and feel fine, but a large slice of chocolate cake can put me to sleep.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on July 25, 2013
at 11:36 AM

Sugar seems very out of place. Sugar is about as safe as they come.

Cc69a51b427eaad36251cce9dcca4d3a

(1074)

on July 25, 2013
at 04:42 AM

pretty much true except i dont rly believe in safe starches if you're obese. they'll all make you fat and leptin/insulin resistant to a degree. also beware of FODMAPS as many ppl are intolerant of fructose or fermentable fibers i.e. fruits, onions/garlic (fructans) would be less optimal than a potato. nightshades can also be problematic (tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, potatoes)

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on July 25, 2013
at 03:37 AM

I would not forget beets, and its greens, good stuff :)

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on July 25, 2013
at 03:19 AM

This strikes me as an accurate digest of the opinions I see most commonly expressed. Good answer!

  • 1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

    asked by

    (529)
  • Views
    1.3K
  • Last Activity
    1427D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

4 Answers

3
56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on July 25, 2013
at 02:49 AM

This is based on my personal experience, and I assume you mean from "less inflammatory" to "more inflammatory". Note also that I eat my wife's bread, if the dough is fermented for more than 24 hours.

Very safe: turnips, yams and sweet potatoes, carrots, parsnips, squash, banana, onions (also other lesser roots such as celery root, chicory root, rutabaga, sunchokes). Cabbage should also be in this list since it has as many calories per ounce as many of these vegetables

Safe: most fruit, beet, potato, other high-carb vegetables (artichokes, zucchini)

Best of a bad bunch: millet, corn (for me. others would put rice instead of corn)

Next level: oats, rice, buckwheat

somewhat inflammatory: teff, amaranth, quinoa

inflammatory: wheat and wheat products, barley

worst: all type of sugars

7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d

(5959)

on July 25, 2013
at 12:44 PM

In the body, starch is pure glucose, and with my blood sugar issues, I do much better with sweet foods than starchy foods. I can eat an entire pint of ice cream and feel fine, but a large slice of chocolate cake can put me to sleep.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on July 25, 2013
at 03:37 AM

I would not forget beets, and its greens, good stuff :)

Cc69a51b427eaad36251cce9dcca4d3a

(1074)

on July 25, 2013
at 04:42 AM

pretty much true except i dont rly believe in safe starches if you're obese. they'll all make you fat and leptin/insulin resistant to a degree. also beware of FODMAPS as many ppl are intolerant of fructose or fermentable fibers i.e. fruits, onions/garlic (fructans) would be less optimal than a potato. nightshades can also be problematic (tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, potatoes)

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on July 25, 2013
at 03:19 AM

This strikes me as an accurate digest of the opinions I see most commonly expressed. Good answer!

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on July 25, 2013
at 11:36 AM

Sugar seems very out of place. Sugar is about as safe as they come.

C6648ab69e5a1560c7585fe3ba7108fb

(880)

on July 25, 2013
at 12:54 PM

I'd also recommend adding in Plantains, if you can find them. They're a nice alternative to bananas that, depending on when you eat them (i.e. how ripe they are) can be mainly starch or a mixture of starch and glucose/fructose (I think...I assume that's why they become more sweet as they ripen.)

0
E481e9a67fbf40997af5283db2bb2517

on July 25, 2013
at 05:29 PM

WAPF might have some useful information about soaking methods to reduce phytates in legumes. I think lentils come out ahead of other legumes (something on Sisson's site, I think, but I can't find it right now). When cooking is available, that might be a useful direction.

Because of the phytates in nuts, it might be advisable for this person to eat the almond butter separately from other foods, so the phytates don't block absorption of the minerals.

0
A80a3a266fd79d61200f8283b193576a

(0)

on July 25, 2013
at 02:41 PM

Be careful with certain sprouts if you have hypothiroidism, as for example brocoli or kale sprouts are much thyroid inhibitors than brocoli or kale itself.

0
72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on July 25, 2013
at 03:25 AM

Glib's answer is pretty tight. I would add that if your friend is into DIY food stuff, sprouting is fun and cheap and is said to greatly improve most grains and legumes. Sprouted lentils supposedly end up with very low levels of phytate and damaging proteins. Sprouted garbanzo beans can be boiled and made into kick-ass hummus. Sprouting vegetable seeds (broccoli, radish, etc) produces delicious, high-nutrition greens for a tiny fraction of the retail price.

Don't sprout kidney beans.

Also, don't use sprouting jars; use a hemp or canvas or mesh bag. It's much easier, and I've never gotten a moldy batch since I made the switch.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!