0

votes

Resistant Starch for "Carb Load"?

Answered on October 25, 2013
Created October 24, 2013 at 3:52 PM

I have recently gotten into resitant starches (hadn't even heard about them before!) and my research is still pretty new/lacking. I have a Spartan Race (2+ hours of running & obstacles) on Saturday and I do my due diligence to carb load for these events (4x bodyweight in g/carbs). Placed top 1% in my last Spartan Race so pretty sure this works well.

My paleo carb load includes mostly sweet potatoes, which I have already steamed and mashed up. My question is:

Would eating these cold (as a resitant starch) somehow effect the "carb load"?

Follow up question: Should I eat ALL of them cold or heat some up? (might not want all that resistant starch in my belly).

Other Question: How many grams of sweet potato would I need to eat to hit 50g resistant starch?

Thanks!!

  • 86c97b2779feab3c330f5e1c5fea7e25

    asked by

    (2312)
  • Views
    2.1K
  • Last Activity
    1731D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

1 Answers

0
543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on October 25, 2013
at 03:21 AM

"How many grams of sweet potato would I need to eat to hit 50g resistant starch?"

Quite a bit going by this (pdf) study, in the the study the RS content per 100g of cooked sweet potato varied between 1.13g/100g & 3.88g/100g. The higher numbers were seen in the cooked/cooled & cooked/dried options.

ps. you would see higher RS numbers if you eat the sweet potato raw (not sure if that's a good idea), 8.22g/100g. Or if you eat (raw) sweet potato starch powder, 26.76/100g.

higher RS options are raw (unmodified) potato starch powder, followed by raw cassava starch powder, based on the same study.

I recall raw plantain/green banana starch powder may also be quite high in RS, tho not as cost effective as raw potato starch powder

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!