3

votes

Extra light olive oil versus canola oil

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created December 29, 2012 at 8:09 PM

I'm sharing a rental house (and kitchen) with my family over the holidays. They are not paleo. I refuse to use canola oil for cooking (doubt many here will disagree with that). I do use extra light olive oil (e.g., http://www.villabertolli.com/product/detail/114615/bertolli-products-extra-light-tasting-olive-oil) for frying as it has a high smoke point and a neutral flavor. I have learned not to talk about paleo with them, however they have again asked why I avoid canola oil. In light of the fact that I'm using extra light olive oil, I'm thinking maybe there isn't a great answer, because:

So, can anyone help me out? I agree that cooking with animal fat is superior and coconut oil is likely better too, but extra light olive oil can be convenient at times. Do I need to give up the extra light olive oil to avoid slow death by cognitive dissonance?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on September 08, 2013
at 11:25 PM

It was bred years ago to produce less erucic acid, but that's beside the GM traits of herbicide resistance.

D41bd7b3d3b962eb0146f471eb632f56

(2029)

on December 30, 2012
at 06:36 PM

Bertolli is one of the brands listed as being not up to standards on their "extra virgin" olive oil. But since we are talking about extra light, it may be different, but I think I'd trust it even less. In any case, it's a short period of time you're using it, so I honestly don't think it's that big of a deal in your case. :)

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on December 30, 2012
at 12:05 PM

Thank you. Very helpful.

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on December 30, 2012
at 07:21 AM

Go with the OO then.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on December 29, 2012
at 10:16 PM

@Roth - in this particular instance, we are just in town for a few days. The smallest size of coconut oil I could find was over $10 and the smallest extra light olive oil was just a few bucks.

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on December 29, 2012
at 09:38 PM

Speaking from a strictly financial perspective, not even comparing the health aspects of either oil.

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on December 29, 2012
at 09:37 PM

Why would you waste money on either oil when coconut oil is so cheap?

E9140ef0ca0a76ea14b9ebccad234608

(615)

on December 29, 2012
at 09:10 PM

ahh my apologies that link isnt so good, i removed it hah! but yea light olive oil is generally industry trash.. just avoid it period..

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on December 29, 2012
at 09:10 PM

Thanks. I'll check it out.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on December 29, 2012
at 08:42 PM

And I've heard that about it being more likely to be adulterated, but I've also found that's hard to prove/disprove. E.g., the Bertolli product I linked to above. I would guess it's not adulterated as they've invested so much in their brand name, it wouldn't be worth the risk, but I can't prove or disprove that.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on December 29, 2012
at 08:41 PM

Thanks. I definitely use lard, tallow and coconut oil. In this instance, we are in the rental house for just a few days and we flew here, so I had to buy some kind of cooking oil. I found a small container of extra light olive for just a few bucks so I don't feel bad throwing it away at the end of the stay. Smallest container of coconut oil I could find was over $10...

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on December 29, 2012
at 08:39 PM

Thanks, but I think there might be a typo in that article. I believe extra light has a higher smoke point than other olive oils http://paleohacks.com/questions/113142/can-we-put-olive-oil-low-smoke-point-myth-to-bed/113152#113152 The article says: "Since it has a lower smoking point than many other types of olive oil, it is suitable for high heat cooking and baking." I'm guessing they meant to say because it has a HIGHER smoking point, it is suitable for high heat cooking.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on December 29, 2012
at 08:39 PM

Thanks, but I think there might be a typo in that article. I believe extra light has a higher smoke point than other olive oils. The article says: "Since it has a lower smoking point than many other types of olive oil, it is suitable for high heat cooking and baking." I'm guessing they meant to say because it has a HIGHER smoking point, it is suitable for high heat cooking.

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7 Answers

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2
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on December 30, 2012
at 02:36 AM

I found an applicable experiment:

"Emissions of low molecular weight aldehydes (LMWAs) from deep-frying of extra virgin olive oil, olive oil, and canola oil (control) were investigated at two temperatures, 180 and 240 ??C, for 15 and 7 h, respectively...The LMWA emissions from both kinds of olive oils were very similar and were lower than those observed from canola oil under similar conditions"

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf035241f

It seems like this will translate to less aldehydes in the oil itself and probably more cooking stability, but it's hard to say from such a study.

Still, it's well known that polyunsaturated fats, especially the omega-3 variety, are less heat stable and canola is richer in both than olive oil. So if we're talking about high heat frying or something like that I definitely vote for using light olive oil over canola oil.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on December 30, 2012
at 12:05 PM

Thank you. Very helpful.

3
D41bd7b3d3b962eb0146f471eb632f56

on December 29, 2012
at 08:37 PM

Extra light olive oil is also more likely to be tainted/cut with other seed oils, despite the packaging. In my opinion it is no better than canola. Go for coconut oil for high heat cooking/frying, especially if you're not ready for lard or tallow yet. ;)

D41bd7b3d3b962eb0146f471eb632f56

(2029)

on December 30, 2012
at 06:36 PM

Bertolli is one of the brands listed as being not up to standards on their "extra virgin" olive oil. But since we are talking about extra light, it may be different, but I think I'd trust it even less. In any case, it's a short period of time you're using it, so I honestly don't think it's that big of a deal in your case. :)

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on December 29, 2012
at 08:41 PM

Thanks. I definitely use lard, tallow and coconut oil. In this instance, we are in the rental house for just a few days and we flew here, so I had to buy some kind of cooking oil. I found a small container of extra light olive for just a few bucks so I don't feel bad throwing it away at the end of the stay. Smallest container of coconut oil I could find was over $10...

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on December 29, 2012
at 08:42 PM

And I've heard that about it being more likely to be adulterated, but I've also found that's hard to prove/disprove. E.g., the Bertolli product I linked to above. I would guess it's not adulterated as they've invested so much in their brand name, it wouldn't be worth the risk, but I can't prove or disprove that.

2
Eecc48184707bc26bce631485b5b7e34

on December 29, 2012
at 09:03 PM

I'd probably use high oleic sunflower oil In fact, I'm on vacation right now with extended family and have purchased this for all cooking.

It's mostly monounsaturated fat like olive oil and is very likely to be what it says it is.

I wouldn't bother with light olive oil - chances are that it's adulterated with other oils.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on December 29, 2012
at 09:10 PM

Thanks. I'll check it out.

1
1f3df724cc6c16e9df4757f05bd8dc0f

on December 29, 2012
at 10:08 PM

Most (all?) canola at least in the US is genetically modified at this point as well. I would use the olive over canola, but coconut is much better.

1
E9140ef0ca0a76ea14b9ebccad234608

(615)

on December 29, 2012
at 08:31 PM

Extra light olive oil is awful in my eyes.. it is very low quality..Very heavily refined ...

Also some producers mix refined olive oil with canola amongst other oils..

E9140ef0ca0a76ea14b9ebccad234608

(615)

on December 29, 2012
at 09:10 PM

ahh my apologies that link isnt so good, i removed it hah! but yea light olive oil is generally industry trash.. just avoid it period..

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on December 29, 2012
at 08:39 PM

Thanks, but I think there might be a typo in that article. I believe extra light has a higher smoke point than other olive oils http://paleohacks.com/questions/113142/can-we-put-olive-oil-low-smoke-point-myth-to-bed/113152#113152 The article says: "Since it has a lower smoking point than many other types of olive oil, it is suitable for high heat cooking and baking." I'm guessing they meant to say because it has a HIGHER smoking point, it is suitable for high heat cooking.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on December 29, 2012
at 08:39 PM

Thanks, but I think there might be a typo in that article. I believe extra light has a higher smoke point than other olive oils. The article says: "Since it has a lower smoking point than many other types of olive oil, it is suitable for high heat cooking and baking." I'm guessing they meant to say because it has a HIGHER smoking point, it is suitable for high heat cooking.

0
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on September 09, 2013
at 06:36 AM

Coconut oil, especially Spectrum brand which is deodorized, IS expensive, but I would still have gone for that if frying stuff. Frying is high heat, it makes nasty fats nastier.

For non-frying you can make some ghee if you get butter of decent quality.

0
Medium avatar

on September 08, 2013
at 09:43 PM

If I remember correctly, Canola is a lab created plant. Isn't it a hybrid of a cottonseed/rapeseed and mustard plant? Either way, it's an unnatural, genetically modified plant with a high trans fat/omega 6 content. I know you were using extra light OO, but when possible, I would recommend coconut, palm shortening, or mac nut oil. All have relatively high smoke points, high nutrient content, and lower omega 6 levels.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on September 08, 2013
at 11:25 PM

It was bred years ago to produce less erucic acid, but that's beside the GM traits of herbicide resistance.

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