1

votes

Canned Tomatoes - Why acceptable?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created October 12, 2012 at 3:51 PM

There are many, many Paleo recipes that call for canned tomatoes however most of them have sugar and stuff like calcium chloride. Why is this acceptable in the Paleo world?

Medium avatar

(2338)

on October 14, 2012
at 12:22 AM

+1 for busy lives. i don't understand why people can't wrap their heads around the fact that everybody can't spend every waking second worrying about their food choices.

Cfe88f41d0f90c6355a58eddbe78c9f8

(868)

on October 13, 2012
at 07:52 PM

Canned tomatoes also don't go bad on my shelf like fresh tomatoes do. It's very nice to have a convenient storage of canned tomatoes for when I need them. Since I don't eat tomatoes on their own very often, I would have to remember to buy them for the specific recipe each time--yeah, that isn't happening.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on October 13, 2012
at 05:31 PM

Calcium chloride is less than half the cost of sea salt and almost 15% less than table salt. But yes, the sodium breaks downtempo cellular walls whereas he calcium removes moisture with degrading he cellular structure.

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on October 13, 2012
at 01:29 PM

If you don't want the skins, which can get leathery in cooking, then it takes longer than two minutes. Also, cooking time is shortened, since they're pre-cooked. Tomatoes out of season aren't worth eating, whereas canned tomatoes are processed when ripe, so the flavor can be superior. Once upon a time, home-canned tomatoes were the only kind available off-season. If one likes canned tomatoes (I love the flavor of good ones) and chooses those without BPA, I don't see a reason not to use them.

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on October 13, 2012
at 01:18 PM

Calcium chloride is a firming agent, not really a preservative. Salt and sugar are preservatives, however, as is acid. It might not be accurate to say "to be avoided," as a blanket statement, but there might be good reasons to avoid some/many of them.

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on October 13, 2012
at 01:14 PM

Calcium chloride is added less for cheap salt flavor or shelf life extension (there's not much that's cheaper than regular salt) and more as a firming agent, so things like diced tomatoes (and many other vegetables) retain their shape and some texture after canning. It takes a vanishingly small amount in a can/jar of tomatoes. Often crushed or sauced tomatoes don't have it, since they're not supposed to be firm.

183f5c49a7a9548b6f5238d1f33cb35e

(1716)

on October 13, 2012
at 10:58 AM

Canned tomatoes have never been safe in my book due to bpa issues. Only eat them fresh in season. Yes, this only means Indian curries in summer :( second best option is crushed tomatoes in a bottle.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 13, 2012
at 04:05 AM

I suppose it takes one to know one, eh?

B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on October 13, 2012
at 02:55 AM

If they're no aware of the distinction they're either to dumb or don't care enough about their health to be successful with a Paleo lifestyle.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 13, 2012
at 02:17 AM

Why not? Many people are not aware of the distinction.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on October 12, 2012
at 10:24 PM

You need to change grocery stores. Try Pomi brand or something organic in glass (BPA free is hard to find)

Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

8 Answers

12
61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10490)

on October 12, 2012
at 04:27 PM

Because every single time someone references an ingredient, they shouldn't have to specify you should use a high quality ingredient. Imagine how tedious recipes would be if it was "organic premium 100% grassfed 20% lean roughly ground chuck beef" or something, all the time instead of "ground beef."

B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on October 13, 2012
at 02:55 AM

If they're no aware of the distinction they're either to dumb or don't care enough about their health to be successful with a Paleo lifestyle.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 13, 2012
at 02:17 AM

Why not? Many people are not aware of the distinction.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 13, 2012
at 04:05 AM

I suppose it takes one to know one, eh?

5
61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on October 12, 2012
at 04:25 PM

Read the labels. There are plenty out there that don't contain questionable ingredients.

4
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on October 12, 2012
at 04:26 PM

It's acceptable because people have busy lives, and telling someone to chop or boil and peel 10 tomatoes can sometimes be overwhelming. Also, there are good, organic versions out there that are probably fine to consume.

Please note that tomatoes themselves have a lot of sugar in them. A single tomato might have 2-4g of sugar. A cup of chopped tomatoes, with nothing else added probably has close to 10g of sugar.

Also, Calcium chloride is just a cheap source of "salt" which helps to enhance the shelf life without adding sodium to the nutrition label. This is GRAS and maybe in the organic tomatoes too.

For me, I chop my own tomatoes because I mostly eat the ones I grow. The only thing that comes from a can is tomato paste.

Medium avatar

(2338)

on October 14, 2012
at 12:22 AM

+1 for busy lives. i don't understand why people can't wrap their heads around the fact that everybody can't spend every waking second worrying about their food choices.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on October 13, 2012
at 05:31 PM

Calcium chloride is less than half the cost of sea salt and almost 15% less than table salt. But yes, the sodium breaks downtempo cellular walls whereas he calcium removes moisture with degrading he cellular structure.

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on October 13, 2012
at 01:14 PM

Calcium chloride is added less for cheap salt flavor or shelf life extension (there's not much that's cheaper than regular salt) and more as a firming agent, so things like diced tomatoes (and many other vegetables) retain their shape and some texture after canning. It takes a vanishingly small amount in a can/jar of tomatoes. Often crushed or sauced tomatoes don't have it, since they're not supposed to be firm.

3
C8976e6d769b80eb516858cbe254edad

(220)

on October 12, 2012
at 04:08 PM

All the ones I see suggest organic canned tomatoes at places like Trader Joes.

2
6498694060d879a7960b35913539b75f

(1307)

on October 12, 2012
at 05:06 PM

I'm so used to substituting the best versions of everything, I hardly pay attention. And I avoid tomato from a can because of the BPA issue. You can find it in a jar or tube. Or just chop your own.

2
4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on October 12, 2012
at 04:26 PM

I haven't seen a lot of tomatoes with sugar in them (unless you count the natural sugar on the nutrition label.). Calcium chloride is a Preservative, so something to be avoided but not totally verboten.

I use canned tomato occasionally because of the BPA issue.

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on October 13, 2012
at 01:18 PM

Calcium chloride is a firming agent, not really a preservative. Salt and sugar are preservatives, however, as is acid. It might not be accurate to say "to be avoided," as a blanket statement, but there might be good reasons to avoid some/many of them.

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 13, 2012
at 02:18 AM

An excellent observation.

It's not acceptable by everyone. Certainly not by those who understand that the nutrient density loss due to modern methods of food production and distribution is extraordinary. A modern tomato from supermarkets is little more than a red water balloon these days.

Also, added sugar does not equate to the sugars found in the fruit. They are metabolically handled very, very differently. The same goes for salt and other additives.

However, it does come down to convenience, availability and economics. Try to make informed choices by increasing your knowledge.

0
9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on October 13, 2012
at 10:39 AM

I don't see why people even use canned tomatoes. Slicing and dicing 4-5 tomatoes takes 2 minutes you could save, but if you're already cooking, it's time you would otherwise spend waiting or doing something else related to cooking. Fresh tomatoes taste better, and are healthier, and don't come with BPA.

It's a no brainer.

Cfe88f41d0f90c6355a58eddbe78c9f8

(868)

on October 13, 2012
at 07:52 PM

Canned tomatoes also don't go bad on my shelf like fresh tomatoes do. It's very nice to have a convenient storage of canned tomatoes for when I need them. Since I don't eat tomatoes on their own very often, I would have to remember to buy them for the specific recipe each time--yeah, that isn't happening.

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on October 13, 2012
at 01:29 PM

If you don't want the skins, which can get leathery in cooking, then it takes longer than two minutes. Also, cooking time is shortened, since they're pre-cooked. Tomatoes out of season aren't worth eating, whereas canned tomatoes are processed when ripe, so the flavor can be superior. Once upon a time, home-canned tomatoes were the only kind available off-season. If one likes canned tomatoes (I love the flavor of good ones) and chooses those without BPA, I don't see a reason not to use them.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!